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fztwenty
03-05-2005, 06:43 PM
Hello everyone!
I have just ordered the fz20 and I have just discovered this site.
:confused: Question:
With all the talk about this and that filter, battery etc.,I am wondering why not get the proprietary ones made for the camera?When I ordered my camera I also ordered the panasonic MC protector DMW-LMC72 just so I can protect the lens.A review site said it had no effect on picture quality.Is this wrong? Should I be getting something different? :eek:

Tyler
03-05-2005, 07:53 PM
Hello everyone!
I have just ordered the fz20 and I have just discovered this site.
:confused: Question:
With all the talk about this and that filter, battery etc.,I am wondering why not get the proprietary ones made for the camera?When I ordered my camera I also ordered the panasonic MC protector DMW-LMC72 just so I can protect the lens.A review site said it had no effect on picture quality.Is this wrong? Should I be getting something different? :eek:

Many people tend to agree that putting the Panasonic 72mm filter on the end of the lens hood adapter is a pretty bad idea. It sits too far away from the lens on the camera and can cause problems with reflections on the lens and on the filter. This will in turn show up in your photos. If you have no intention of adding tele-conversion lenses you might consider the solution that nextphoto offers. They have a little snap-in ring that fits inside the FZ20 lens and will allow you to use a variety of common 52mm & 55mm filters available at camera shops everywhere.

http://www.nextphoto.net/FZ20.htm

The MC filter is there primarily to protect the lens from accidental damage and to help keep it clean from dust and finger prints. Most people tend to believe that it is better to clean a filter than repeatadly cleaning the expensive camera lens which might get scratched. A filter is cheap insurance compared with the cost of replacing the camera's lens if damaged.

A UV filter does very little to add to picture quality and also works mostly as a lens protector when used on digital cameras. A UV filter is said to help filter out harsh UV radiation at higher elevations and offers some benefit with exposure control. A polarizing filter will help to reduce reflections on glass and water surface and adds a little "punch' to clouds in the sky. A neutral density filter will help get better exposure settings in harsh lighting conditions such as at high elevations or in deserts with bright noon time sun.

For an example of how various filters might affect image quality check out the example pictures at the Tiffen filter site -
http://www.tiffen.com/filters.htm

Some purists argue that having any filter or piece of glass in front of the primary lens of the camera creates an unacceptable degredation in optical quality. Many counter that it is an acceptable trade-off for the protection that they afford. I'm in the acceptable trade-off camp.