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View Full Version : Canon 50mm F/1.8 Prime



ktixx
03-03-2005, 11:34 AM
I have heard countless times that the 50mm F/1.8 Canon prime is an unbeatable deal at $80.00. Do you think it is possible to use this lens for wedding photography? or will the low aperture cause the subjects to be slightly out of focus around their edges? Also, will the fact that there is no zoom cause problems while trying to move around a church or do you think that an 80mm lens (50 * 1.6x) will be sufficient? I also have a sigma 18-125 that I would use as a primary lens, but for those times when the light is just to low I would swap out it out for the 50mm. Any experiences/suggestions will be much appreciated.
Ken

D70FAN
03-03-2005, 12:19 PM
I have heard countless times that the 50mm F/1.8 Canon prime is an unbeatable deal at $80.00. Do you think it is possible to use this lens for wedding photography? or will the low aperture cause the subjects to be slightly out of focus around their edges? Also, will the fact that there is no zoom cause problems while trying to move around a church or do you think that an 80mm lens (50 * 1.6x) will be sufficient? I also have a sigma 18-125 that I would use as a primary lens, but for those times when the light is just to low I would swap out it out for the 50mm. Any experiences/suggestions will be much appreciated.
Ken

You definately should have a 50mm f1.8 in your kit. It is a portrait lens, and you can change the aperture to suite the depth-of-field requirements (of course as DOF increases shutter speed decreases). The 18-125 is still a good choice for outdoor and flash shots (you do have an iTTL coupled flash right?). If you want a good all around "wedding lens" then take a look at the Tamron 28-75 f2.8. It is rated right up there with the 28-70 f2.8 USM L from Canon, but for about $370.

jamison55
03-03-2005, 12:34 PM
The 50 1.8 is an exceptional lens that works great for wedding photography. I often use mine when I turn the flash off during the ceremony.

Zoom vs Prime is a more difficult question. For those who want to put together a kit of sharp, fast, glass for any camera primes give you the most bang for your buck (many Canon primes can be had for $200-$300 and you can put together a 17-135mm kit of primes for less than the price of an "L" zoom http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=4893). The downside of primes; you have to zoom with your feet, and potentially change lenses during a fast moving ceremony. Wedding photographers have been using primes for years and getting great output. You have to develop your own workflow around your equipment.

Having said all of that, I shoot with a combination of primes and zooms. I find that some officiants are less patient with the photographer moving around too much, and a zoom allows me to be a little more discreet. My current zoom of choice is the Tamron 28-75 f2.8 that George mentioned. It is fast enough to use in ambient lighting in all but the darkest of churches, and has a nice focal length for a wedding ceremony. I usually also carry my DReb with a Canon 135 f2.8 attached. It allows me the extra zoom power when I am shooting the audience, or want to get in real tight with the bride and groom.

I think you'll have difficulty in those dark New England Catholic churches with the Sigma 18-125 unless you always use it with a flash setup. I shot my first wedding with the DReb kit lens and high ISO's, and had to throw away a lot of the shots due to the slow shutter speed, and PS the heck out of the ones I was able to keep.

Anyway, that was kind of a long winded way to say that you can't go wrong with the 50 1.8.

PS - I noticed that you live in CT. Maybe I shouldn't be so free with my advice since we'll likely soon be competing for clients ;)! Seriously though, I will be looing for a new assistant in a month or so (when my current assistant starts shooting on his own). PM me if you are interested in tagging along on a couple of spring weddings.