PDA

View Full Version : Re-use Contax RTS Lenses



alfred
02-26-2005, 07:30 PM
Would anybody have any suggestions to use Contax RTS lenses with digital cameras. I am in the market for a dslr but anything of my liking is very expensive mainly I will have to buy body and lenses. This lenses are of course totaly manual but if they connect to any dslr the shutter would be controlled by the camera and the rest by me (like on the RTS). If, as I may suspect there is no practical use apart with the RTS and 35 mm film I would have an other question. What is the best way to extract a digital picture from a 35 mm neg. I tried a few ways and some commercial ones too but so fahr the digital cameras output is better the the scanning. I use a Olympus C3030 and recently got a Panasonic LC1 but miss the use of teles and wide angle lenses.

Thank you
Alf

Samuel Lo
02-27-2005, 08:37 PM
Would anybody have any suggestions to use Contax RTS lenses with digital cameras. I am in the market for a dslr but anything of my liking is very expensive mainly I will have to buy body and lenses. This lenses are of course totaly manual but if they connect to any dslr the shutter would be controlled by the camera and the rest by me (like on the RTS). If, as I may suspect there is no practical use apart with the RTS and 35 mm film I would have an other question. What is the best way to extract a digital picture from a 35 mm neg. I tried a few ways and some commercial ones too but so fahr the digital cameras output is better the the scanning. I use a Olympus C3030 and recently got a Panasonic LC1 but miss the use of teles and wide angle lenses.

Thank you
Alf


I don't think there is any DSLR will receive the Contax RTS Lenses, even Contax itself's DSLR use only the "N"series Lens. Although you can find or custom made an adapter to mount it on some DSLR, e.g. Canon, you get only manual focus and have to buy a light meter, I don't think it worth to do that.

The best way to digitize your negative is to buy an expensive, huge drum scanner which used in the industry; down a step, a film scanner will do it very well. If you scanner it through a flatbed scanner, the result will not quite satisfied.

alfred
03-01-2005, 02:50 AM
Thanks for the Lens advice but could you elaborate on "huge, expensive, drum scanner" Who has one, how do I ask some business if the have one?
I have an Epson 2450 Flatbed and it is not to great on negs or slides. What kind of scanning does the better equipt photo developers use?

Regards
Alfred

Samuel Lo
03-01-2005, 10:26 AM
Thanks for the Lens advice but could you elaborate on "huge, expensive, drum scanner" Who has one, how do I ask some business if the have one?
I have an Epson 2450 Flatbed and it is not to great on negs or slides. What kind of scanning does the better equipt photo developers use?

Regards
Alfred

Usually it was used in large publishing house or pro lab.

Kodak HR500 plus is a common film scanner that lab will use nowadays; it can accept most of the format of film, negative or slide, and the scannin speed is very fast.

If for personal use, you can look at Nikon or Minolta's film scanner; they are quite good and much, much cheaper, though a bit slow. I have a Kodak RFS 3600 film scanner, the resolution is close (not the same) to HR500, but it is very, very slow. Luckily it can accept the whole roll of film, and I think it take hours to scan all 36 frames. I don't the exact time because I always insert the film to the scanner for scan and go to sleep and it was done when I wake up

Alland44
03-16-2008, 10:36 AM
I, also have these thougths - Putting my old RST lenses on a Canon body ?
Even if I have to use a separate manual measuring method, if the quality is good.

I have seen a few contax/adapter/canon body pictures and thougth they were quite good :)

Does anybody know more about these matters ? Links to photos taken this "style" or maby them selves experimenting with it ?