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wall7760
02-17-2005, 09:11 PM
ok so i need help. I have a cannon digital rebel. Im on the publications staff for my school and i want to take sport photos. Ive had my camera for about a year and a half now so i know about iso and all that, but i have no clue what settings to put it on when taking pictures indoors. Most of the sports we cannot use a falsh becuase it will "destract the players". I normally end up having to put my iso all the way up to 1600, and put it on 100, 5.6. This is nrmally wehn I am on the "M" setting on my camera (i dotn know what that stands for and i dont wnat to get the manual out). they are mostly dark or blurry. Dose anyone have any advice on how i can get crisp, normal colored pictures without setting my iso so high. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Geoff Chandler
02-17-2005, 10:43 PM
I am not up to speed with this camera - but I would advise putting it into Av (if it were me) and setting the aperture wide it will choose as fast a shutter as will give the correct exposure - still keep the ISO at or above 400. Select manual white and set it using a white card ar piece of paper. Depending on the lighting and background you may need to compensat down or even up to get the best exposure balance.
Good Luck

Geoff

ktixx
02-18-2005, 01:57 AM
ok so i need help. I have a cannon digital rebel. Im on the publications staff for my school and i want to take sport photos. Ive had my camera for about a year and a half now so i know about iso and all that, but i have no clue what settings to put it on when taking pictures indoors. Most of the sports we cannot use a falsh becuase it will "destract the players". I normally end up having to put my iso all the way up to 1600, and put it on 100, 5.6. This is nrmally wehn I am on the "M" setting on my camera (i dotn know what that stands for and i dont wnat to get the manual out). they are mostly dark or blurry. Dose anyone have any advice on how i can get crisp, normal colored pictures without setting my iso so high. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

The "M" on your camera stands for the one item you don't want to take out, the MANUAL :) M = Manual. Basically you have to do everything, nothing will be automatically adjusted for you. What I can suggest, no matter what setting you use, is to keep the ISO as high as it will go (IE: 1600) Use a tripod (or monopod at worst) and lower the shutter speed. If you go to low on the shutter you will probably blur the action. But overall the highest ISO is probably the only way to properly capture the shot. The only reason not to use a high ISO is because of noise. I suggest using Noise Ninja 2.0 ( http://www.picturecode.com/ ) and downloading a custom camera profile for the digital rebel. Good luck
Ken

TheObiJuan
02-18-2005, 02:16 AM
i would suggest some fast lenses.
are you in a position to purchase new lenses? will the school fit the bill?
perhaps a 300 F2.8L
or the 70-200 2.8L IS
image stabilization and a fast aperture will help keep the images from being dark. it will also keep the ISO down, so there will be minimal noise. you can also use a faster shutter to keep the image tack sharp.

good luck.

wall7760
02-18-2005, 01:05 PM
afteripostedthis last night i thought of getting a new lense which i amlooking into. I cant really keepmy iso up becuase they blow the pictures up adnthey always have bluish lines on them. I wantto set my white ballance but ive always been afraid to screw up the camera. when i take on "AV" i find it dosent normally work as well, but i will try again. thanks for the advie ill look into it all

nate
02-18-2005, 04:04 PM
I would try putting on Tv mode, and setting the exposure time fast enough to freeze the action. Let the camera automatically adjust the aperture and ISO. I don't own this camera, but that's just my idea.

Also, try a monopod if possible. They're pretty helpful. Think of them as old-fashioned IS.

PhilR.
02-18-2005, 04:23 PM
Tripods, monopods, IS, etc. aren't the key here. This person wants to take pics of people playing sports. Unless these happen to be chess players, then he will need to use shutter speeds high enough to capture the action. If the shutter speed is high enough to do this, then it will be high enough to cancel the movement of the photographer. That is why support and IS is of secondary concern.

I would agree with Mr. Chandler's post. Jack up the ISO as high as it will go, use aperture priority mode and open the aperture as wide as it will go. This will force the camera to use the highest shutter speed possible for the existing light. If this does not attain the shutter speeds needed to adequately capture moving athletes, then you will need to either get a camera that will allow even higher ISO's, or a faster lense.

By the way - manually setting the white balance won't "screw up" the camera. It's not permanent, and you can always set it back where you originally started....

PhilR.

wall7760
02-24-2005, 02:21 PM
Ok so i went and finally bought a new lense. Its not the 2000$ one with the image stabalizer and all the fun stuff, but the apuratue level on this lense is soooo much better than the last one i had. It freezes the images as much as i can expect, but when im tlking indoors I still have to set my ISO up to 1600, is ther ANY way that i can get good pictures without all the noise?

dwig
02-25-2005, 08:01 AM
It this point, the ball is in your court; other than a lens with an image stabilizer there is not much that equipment can "automatically" do for you.

Improvements from this point on will largely require that you develop better skills. To reduce noise, you have to reduce the ISO, which means you have to learn to get good shots at lower shutter speeds. This can be done, the pro's do it, but it requires that you learn to pan with the action accurately and shoot withoutT even the slightest interuption in your panning. You may well need to shift to manual focus, focus ahead of the action, and then shoot as the action moves into focus. It is critical that you learn the particular sport very well so that you can "read" the play action and anticipate where and when the good shots will be.

Also, _always_ work as close as possible allowing the use of the shortest possible focal length. Don't shoot action across the court; shoot only what's near you. Don't move to where the action is, move to where it will be.

wall7760
02-27-2005, 01:52 PM
ok ill try that. thanks for everything.