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Rhys
02-12-2005, 11:05 AM
Out of interest, I have had a partly covered Cibachrome print on the top of a cabinet in my bedroom for the past 10 years. It has not been in direct sunlight although the sun has shone on it through closed curtains. There is now a clear difference between the shaded and exposed areas with the exposed areas having faded by about 50%. I compare that with a print using an Epson Stylus 400 Colour printer and generic ink. That faded in around 3 years.

It strikes me that Cibachrome does not live up to its reputation for not fading for 50 years. Equally, I see that the claims of the ink manufacturers for 10 year anti-fade ink are just as bogus.

My opinion is that laser-generated prints are the most colour durable. However, the fact is that all images can be reprinted easily from digital. I suggest that instead of going for expensive pigment-based ink systems, we should go for a 3-year print replenishment cycle.

erichlund
02-13-2005, 02:36 PM
My opinion is that laser-generated prints are the most colour durable. However, the fact is that all images can be reprinted easily from digital. I suggest that instead of going for expensive pigment-based ink systems, we should go for a 3-year print replenishment cycle.

I'm sure the customers of the pros here would appreciate having a 3 year print. BTW, if you actually take measures to protect the photos, they last longer. It's likely part of the assumption.

Cheers,
Eric

Rhys
02-13-2005, 03:15 PM
I'm sure the customers of the pros here would appreciate having a 3 year print. BTW, if you actually take measures to protect the photos, they last longer. It's likely part of the assumption.

Cheers,
Eric

Yes. That's true. But I recall the Cibachrome adverts of the 1990s in which I recall they stated that they could leave a print in the desert for 50 years and it wouldn't fade in the sunshine.

I see the ink adverts now as 10 years non fade. Now that gives the message to the customer that the ink won't fade when exposed to light for 10 years. This is, of course, complete nonsense and a complete lie. If the print is put in a dark folder and viewed occasionally then I would expect the ink to remain unfaded for over a century.

I don't mind advetisers selling a product but I don't accept advertisers telling bare-faced lies about products. Where's the difference between "this print won't fade if left exposed to strong sun for 50 years" and "this pill will make you attractive to women, will remove your beer gut, will make hair magically grow on your bald patch and will make you 20 years younger as well as enhancing your intelligence"?

gary_hendricks
02-20-2005, 01:58 AM
Yes. That's true. But I recall the Cibachrome adverts of the 1990s in which I recall they stated that they could leave a print in the desert for 50 years and it wouldn't fade in the sunshine.

Very true. I remember those adverts! But I personally don't think they live up to their claims.

erichlund
02-21-2005, 10:11 AM
But...But...But...

You mean they didn't actually do a series of 50 year tests to verify that the prints would last that long? What's the world coming to? You mean you cannot trust every word out of an advertiser? These are the guys that look up to lawyers for advice, right? :rolleyes:

Two things:
The purpose of advertising is to get people to buy products. It is not to inform the public of all factors concerning a product. They paint the best picture that they can get away with.

Let the buyer beware! You the consumer are responsible for doing due diligence. In many (most?) countries, there are laws requiring some degree of truth in advertising. These are some of the most easily abused laws on the planet.

Cheers,
Eric

Rhys
02-21-2005, 10:28 AM
But...But...But...

You mean they didn't actually do a series of 50 year tests to verify that the prints would last that long? What's the world coming to? You mean you cannot trust every word out of an advertiser? These are the guys that look up to lawyers for advice, right? :rolleyes:

Two things:
The purpose of advertising is to get people to buy products. It is not to inform the public of all factors concerning a product. They paint the best picture that they can get away with.

Let the buyer beware! You the consumer are responsible for doing due diligence. In many (most?) countries, there are laws requiring some degree of truth in advertising. These are some of the most easily abused laws on the planet.

Cheers,
Eric


Lol. But the problem for advertisors is not that they lie. We know they lie most of the time. The problem is that when their lies are uncovered, the product's reputation goes straight down the pan. Positive sales now because of advertising lies leads to zero sales later when the consumer finds they've been mislead. A consumer who's been mislead by the advertiser hired by company X is quite liable to make a point of never buying company X's products ever again.