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View Full Version : how can I achieve this please?



rebelgirl
02-12-2005, 04:56 AM
Just got a Canon 300d today, as a gift, but it is very well advanced to me (have lived on crappy disposable camera's so far). I just want help on the basic settings I should chose to be able to take pictures of these beautiful quality.
and how do I get the background of a photo to blur like this?



I only have the basic lens kit but just want to know how to get a nice tone on the pictures using manual settings, whether or not to use the flash or not, white balance settings etc.

D70FAN
02-12-2005, 07:07 AM
Just got a Canon 300d today, as a gift, but it is very well advanced to me (have lived on crappy disposable camera's so far). I just want help on the basic settings I should chose to be able to take pictures of these beautiful quality.

http://img136.exs.cx/img136/9035/babyphotos9xo.jpg

and how do I get the background of a photo to blur like this?

http://img136.exs.cx/img136/2606/somethingblue5sp.jpg

I only have the basic lens kit but just want to know how to get a nice tone on the pictures using manual settings, whether or not to use the flash or not, white balance settings etc.

For your first example picture, just set the camera to auto and shoot. Please notice that there is a lot of natural light available in those pictures, so the flash was not required.

For the second picture the same is true, but for better results you should prbably set the DReb to aperture priority mode (top dial set to Av) and use the setting wheel (by the shutter release) to set the aperture to about 3.5 to 5.6 (as you zoom in and out this number will change a little, but don't worry it will still give you the nice blurred background you are looking for).
Again, the more natural light, the better.

Take your time and learn to shoot with a dSLR. There is a learning curve, but once you get the basics down you will amaze yourself. :)

Finally, you should invest in one of the shortcourse books for your DReb from these guys:

http://www.shortcourses.com/bookstore/book.htm

They have a shortcourse on the DReb which should help you quite a bit. You might also want to visit you library and see if they have the Ansel Adams tutorials on general phtography. It doesn't matter that these were written for film as the basic rules of light management don't change.

rebelgirl
02-12-2005, 08:22 AM
wow, thanks so much for your reply, you've helped me so much. the only problem i'm having now is, with the natural light fading, i've tried taking picture with the flash but the background is all dark, even though on the camera screen they look PERFECT, when I upload them to the computer they are so dark :-( any idea why that happens?

jamison55
02-12-2005, 12:05 PM
wow, thanks so much for your reply, you've helped me so much. the only problem i'm having now is, with the natural light fading, i've tried taking picture with the flash but the background is all dark, even though on the camera screen they look PERFECT, when I upload them to the computer they are so dark :-( any idea why that happens?

Many people complain that flash pictures appear too dark from the Digital Rebel. Before you try to adjust for this, make sure your monitor is properly calibrated: http://www.pawprint.net/designresources/monitorcalibration.php

OK, so now you're calibrated. Do the pictures still look dark? If yes, than you can try to compensate...

First off, the lcd on the DReb is always brighter than the actual output. This is great for reviewing pics in bright sunlight but not so hot when you are basing your exposure judgements on it. I suggest you learn to use the histogram, which will give you an accurate representation of the exposure.

Now, to fix the flash underexposure:

Technique
When using the flash, turn the dial to manual, and choose f4 or f8 and 1/30 to 1/60sec for a shutter speed. The slower shutter speed will help balance the ambient light with the flash exposure, leading to more natural looking photos.

If it is not too dark, bump up the ISO so that you don't need the flash at all.

FEC
FEC (Flash Exposure Compensation) allows you to dial up or down the flash. This feature was not enabled on the DReb, but a young russian figured out how to turn it on through a firmware hack. I installed the hack in mine, just for this feature, and it works great. It probably voids the warranty though, so you might want to wait until the consistent flash underexposure really ticks you off... Here's a link to the update:http://www.bahneman.com/liem/photos/tricks/digital-rebel-tricks.html

Spend More Money...
...on an external flash. No need for a fancy ETTL model (in fact the ETTL is the problem in the first place). An automatic tryistor flash will do the thinking instead of the camera, leading to better exposures. I suggest the Sunpak 383. It is powerful, safe to use on the DReb, bounces, swivels, and can be had for around $80 online.

One of the acknowledged weaknesses of the DReb is the flash metering, but once you learn the workarounds you should get satisfying results... Best of luck!

--JAMIE

ReF
02-13-2005, 01:33 AM
in the first shot, the blur is caused by movement that is too fast for the shutter speed used, flash off. if you use a shutter speed of about 1/40 (indicated simply as 40 on the Rebel) you should get a decent blur from movement while keeping the speed fast enough for you to hold steady. the second shot seems to have been done without the flash in the Auto White Balance mode. the rebel has a flaw with it's Auto white balance under Tungsten (regular light bulb) and flourecent lighting so things have an orange cast. this can actually be used to advantage because it adds a warm glow to your picture if that's what you're after. using the flash will actually correct the color cast and cause you to loose that warm tone. you can also try using the Indoor/shady white balance setting for a slight variation of the warm tone, or shoot in RAW mode and adjust the white balance by Kelvin temp to your liking in the RAW converter. i just got the Rebel a few weeks ago but i am pretty familiar with it so feel free to ask whatever :)

if your pics look bright on everything except your PC then it is not properly calibrated. i posted a longer reply under the subject: Canon > "a75 dark pics when transfer to PC"

rebelgirl
02-13-2005, 03:03 AM
Many people complain that flash pictures appear too dark from the Digital Rebel. Before you try to adjust for this, make sure your monitor is properly calibrated: http://www.pawprint.net/designresources/monitorcalibration.php

OK, so now you're calibrated. Do the pictures still look dark? If yes, than you can try to compensate...

First off, the lcd on the DReb is always brighter than the actual output. This is great for reviewing pics in bright sunlight but not so hot when you are basing your exposure judgements on it. I suggest you learn to use the histogram, which will give you an accurate representation of the exposure.

Now, to fix the flash underexposure:

Technique
When using the flash, turn the dial to manual, and choose f4 or f8 and 1/30 to 1/60sec for a shutter speed. The slower shutter speed will help balance the ambient light with the flash exposure, leading to more natural looking photos.

If it is not too dark, bump up the ISO so that you don't need the flash at all.

FEC
FEC (Flash Exposure Compensation) allows you to dial up or down the flash. This feature was not enabled on the DReb, but a young russian figured out how to turn it on through a firmware hack. I installed the hack in mine, just for this feature, and it works great. It probably voids the warranty though, so you might want to wait until the consistent flash underexposure really ticks you off... Here's a link to the update:http://www.bahneman.com/liem/photos/tricks/digital-rebel-tricks.html

Spend More Money...
...on an external flash. No need for a fancy ETTL model (in fact the ETTL is the problem in the first place). An automatic tryistor flash will do the thinking instead of the camera, leading to better exposures. I suggest the Sunpak 383. It is powerful, safe to use on the DReb, bounces, swivels, and can be had for around $80 online.

One of the acknowledged weaknesses of the DReb is the flash metering, but once you learn the workarounds you should get satisfying results... Best of luck!

--JAMIE

Thank you, you've given me a lot to look up now, I'm so bad at reading manuals so am going to have to put in the effort to learn all this stuff, thanks for giving great information that wasn't too complicated! I can't find out how to adjust the shutter speed though :-\ but I'm sure after a few hours reading I'll find it, thank you so so much!

rebelgirl
02-13-2005, 03:06 AM
in the first shot, the blur is caused by movement that is too fast for the shutter speed used, flash off. if you use a shutter speed of about 1/40 (indicated simply as 40 on the Rebel) you should get a decent blur from movement while keeping the speed fast enough for you to hold steady. the second shot seems to have been done without the flash in the Auto White Balance mode. the rebel has a flaw with it's Auto white balance under Tungsten (regular light bulb) and flourecent lighting so things have an orange cast. this can actually be used to advantage because it adds a warm glow to your picture if that's what you're after. using the flash will actually correct the color cast and cause you to loose that warm tone. you can also try using the Indoor/shady white balance setting for a slight variation of the warm tone, or shoot in RAW mode and adjust the white balance by Kelvin temp to your liking in the RAW converter. i just got the Rebel a few weeks ago but i am pretty familiar with it so feel free to ask whatever :)

if your pics look bright on everything except your PC then it is not properly calibrated. i posted a longer reply under the subject: Canon > "a75 dark pics when transfer to PC"

Hi there, I couldn't figure out how to get it to shoot in RAW mode at all! I tried on the manual camera settings then on the camera settings on the computer when it was linked up, I tried adjusting the white balance yesterday but it didn't seem to make much difference, I also don't like that you can't stop the flash from coming up if you don't want to use it!

Thanks very much, my PC screen is ok, I've had a bit more luck today but one picture has still turned out dark and is driving me spare!

D70FAN
02-13-2005, 07:36 AM
Hi there, I couldn't figure out how to get it to shoot in RAW mode at all! I tried on the manual camera settings then on the camera settings on the computer when it was linked up, I tried adjusting the white balance yesterday but it didn't seem to make much difference, I also don't like that you can't stop the flash from coming up if you don't want to use it!

Thanks very much, my PC screen is ok, I've had a bit more luck today but one picture has still turned out dark and is driving me spare!

These guys are forgetting that you are going from a point-n-shoot to a dSLR, and have no background in photography.

Again, take it slow and get the book from shortcourses on your DReb. In the mean time you can also use Jeff Kellers review to give you the basics of where different settings can be accessed (click on the URL which follows).

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/canon/eos_300d-review/index.shtml

You might also want to ask around at your local camera stores to see if anyone offers a tutorial on dSLR's or the Canon in particular.

The fun has just begun... :)

ReF
02-14-2005, 02:12 AM
Hi there, I couldn't figure out how to get it to shoot in RAW mode at all! I tried on the manual camera settings then on the camera settings on the computer when it was linked up, I tried adjusting the white balance yesterday but it didn't seem to make much difference, I also don't like that you can't stop the flash from coming up if you don't want to use it!

Thanks very much, my PC screen is ok, I've had a bit more luck today but one picture has still turned out dark and is driving me spare!

to switch to RAW mode, hit the MENU button, press set, the quality option should now the highligted, hit set, a list will appear and the RAW option should be at the bottom of the list, select RAW using the four way controller, hit set again. remember that a RAW file must be converted into a JPEG using the "file viewer utility" program that came with the camera before it can viewed in normal picture viewing applications.

the flash will pop up automatically in AUTO mode (green rectangle on the main dial). i suggest using the P setting which is still auto for the most part but allows a bit more control over the settings.

i agree with the above post you can pick up a few things by reading through the review on this site if you haven't already done that.

since you are coming from Point and shoot cameras, let me give you these very short and simplified explanations of a few photography concepts:

shutter speed: refers to the amount of time the sensor is exposed to light. a fast shutter speed lets in less light and can be used to "freeze" fast movement. slower shutter speeds are useful for letting more light into the camera (giving you a brighter picture) but blur caused by movement from the subject or not holding the camera steady enough can occur.
you can control the shutter speed by setting your camera's main dial to TV

aperture: refers to an opening in the lens. this opening can be opened or closed down. aperture settings are written as f2.8 or f11 for example. large openings/apertures have a small numerical value such as f2.8 and small apertures have higher numerical values such as f11. the larger the opening, the more light is allowed to reach the sensor in a given amount of time. apertures also control the depth of field (DOF) in a scene. DOF refers to how many objects at different distances are in focus. smaller apertures have better DOF. for example, if you placed a cup on a table and another cup three feet behind it, then you focused on the cup closest to you and took a picture at f2.8, the cup in front will be in focus while the one behind will be blurry. this refered to as a shallow DOF. if you took that same picture at f11, then both cups should be in focus, or at least the cup further back will be less blurry. most lenses are sharpest at around f8.0-f11. the lens will be softest (unsharp) at it's largest aperture.
you can control the aperture by setting your camera's main dial to AV

you can control both the aperture and shutter speed at the same time by switching the main dial to M, but it takes a little experience to get the right combination of settings.

ISO: controls how sensitive your camera is to light. higher ISO numbers = more sensitivity to light, which means you can use a faster shutter speed, smaller aperture, or simply get a brighter picture. to control the ISO, hold down the button labeled ISO and roll the jog dial (the black unlabeled dial next to your index finger) back and forth. Higher ISO also = more grain in your pictures (aka noise). it starts to get a little grainy at ISO 800 and it gets pretty bad at ISO 1600, but it is still much better than the graininess you see from non D-SLR digital cameras. ISO 800 on a D-SLR has less noise/grain than ISO 200 on a standard 5 megapixel digital camera.

you should still get the book that was recommended but i feel that everyone should at least have a basic understanding of the concepts above if they want to get any kind of enjoyment out of such a camera. otherwise it can be frustrating. if anyone can explain things better, please do.

tulacoca
02-15-2005, 12:19 PM
I just got a Nikon D70 and also ordered a training video from Blue Crane Digital(BHPhotovideo.com) introduces to this camera and its functions. Its so great since I am also new at SLRs. Check their website and see if they have a video for your camera. Good Luck Tulacoca