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View Full Version : Digital Rebel w/low light



NewTekBuzz
02-09-2005, 09:58 AM
I am looking to buy this cam. but I am worried about low light shots!! anyone have any input on this?

T.I.A.

Tim

D70FAN
02-09-2005, 12:14 PM
I am looking to buy this cam. but I am worried about low light shots!! anyone have any input on this?

T.I.A.

Tim

With the capability to take relatively clean shots all the way to ISO 1600, and having the availability of zoom lenses offering f2.8 starting at around $380 (Sigma 24-70mm f2.8 EX Aspherical DG DF) and image stabilization in the $400 range (Canon EF 28-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS) low light should not be a limitation issue.

There are reasons that most professional photographers use dSLR's...

...performance and options.

Rex914
02-09-2005, 03:26 PM
If you are taking shots of still objects in low light, then an IS lens is a cheaper and more appropriate solution. If you are talking more about taking pictures of action and sports, then you'll need a faster (f/2-2.8) lens.

NewTekBuzz
02-09-2005, 04:34 PM
The lenes I have now are from my 35mm EOS rebel II S, EF 35-80 1:4-5.6 & EF 75-300 1:4-5.6 are these any good? they are both canons. be honist!
I have to say... I really dont know much about the different lenes aside from the zooming. So with digital there are no film speeds... 200 400 and so on. how do you set the camera up for the dif. lighting?
could you please point me into the right direction for some reading on what the lens marking means?

Thanks again, Tim

jeisner
02-09-2005, 07:22 PM
I don't know of the quality as I don't use canon, but they are rather slow, plus the 35mm widest angle on a DSLR would give you just over 50mm so useless as a wide angle!

D70FAN
02-09-2005, 07:25 PM
The lenes I have now are from my 35mm EOS rebel II S, EF 35-80 1:4-5.6 & EF 75-300 1:4-5.6 are these any good? they are both canons. be honist!
I have to say... I really dont know much about the different lenes aside from the zooming. So with digital there are no film speeds... 200 400 and so on. how do you set the camera up for the dif. lighting?
could you please point me into the right direction for some reading on what the lens marking means?

Thanks again, Tim

You can use your old lenses on the DReb, but they will not allow you to shoot with a wide field of vision, as you must multiply the lens range by 1.6. So now the 35mm-80mm lens is equivelent to a 56mm-128mm lens. This is because the sensor is smaller than a 35mm film frame by that factor, so it is like cropping the 35mm negative. This is called the "crop factor".

With digital there are "equivalent" film speeds and they represent the same sensitivity factor as film and even retain the ISO ratings of 100, 200, 400, 800, and 1600 (for example).

The lens marking is relatively simple:

The primary numbers represent the focal length, or range, on a fixed focus or zoom lens. 50mm is considered the "neutral point" which approximates what your eyes see. Below 50mm is considered wide angle and above is considered telephoto. So, for example, a 28mm lens is wide angle and a 105mm lens is telephoto.

The f rating represents the amount of light the lens will allow to pass through the "aperture", controlled by a variable mechanical device that opens and closes according to required shutter speed and available light. So an aperture of f2.8 means the opening is wide allowing a lot of light in and f8 would be a smaller opening, allowing less light, but allowing a deeper focus distance called depth of field or DOF. At f2.8 the main subject would be in fine focus, but the background would be blurred (think of a portrait). At f8, and greater, more of the background would be in focus.

This is just a quick explanation, so I would suggest a trip to the library and a book on basic photography. Digital cameras follow most of the same rules as film. Just keep in mind it is mostly light management and you will be ahead of the game.

Hope this helps.

NewTekBuzz
02-10-2005, 03:31 AM
Thanks alot george. I will do some reading and catch you later :)

thanks everyone!!

gary_hendricks
02-10-2005, 09:19 AM
I am looking to buy this cam. but I am worried about low light shots!! anyone have any input on this?

T.I.A.

Tim

The camera itself won't have problems with low light - it's a matter of what setting you choose in a particular shot. Adjust the shutter speed, aperture or ISO as appropriate.

timmciglobal
02-10-2005, 11:36 AM
Speaking out of experience, biggest issue with low light shots is time to focus not good exposure.

The less avalible light = the greater the difficulty of focus for AF. 28-135 will focus it'll just take a LONG time (useless for "oh I want the picture now or moving people)

A prime (non zoom lens) something like 50 mm F 1.8 is a PERFECT low light lens for about 75$, its fixed at 50 mm which is ~ 88 mm on your rebel but it focuses much faster and can take MUCH faster shutter speeds then a 28>135 3.5/4.5 lens.

Tim

ReF
02-11-2005, 03:40 PM
I am looking to buy this cam. but I am worried about low light shots!! anyone have any input on this?

T.I.A.

Tim

i'm not clear on whether you are refering to low-light focusing or low light shooting in general. in both cases the rebel is far beyond any non-dslr cam that i've tried (have not used the sony cams with their laser-grid AF lamps though). i've found low light shooting to be easiest with large aperture lenses. if you need a little more depth of field then Image Stabilization is quite useful. as for focusing in low light, the rebel focuses quite quickly without an AF assist lamp. if you do use the lamp, which is really the flash in "strobe mode," the light it emits is so bright that focusing quick and easy. it does have a bit of a problem focusing on fur(in dim light) and mirrored objects (in any lighting) though.

nick_the_guy
02-11-2005, 05:14 PM
I would have to note that IS in low light doesn't help if your target is moving! Concert photography comes to mind, where the musicians may be thrashing away on stage.

NewTekBuzz
02-12-2005, 02:28 AM
The Digital cam that I have now is the Kodak DC290 (point and shoot) its not very good at low light, like around dusk or even just before. I can see that I have a lot to learn... mostly on what lens I will need. This board has been a great help.. I think even the "where to buy" section saved my ass (thanks rhys).
ReF, I guess i was talking about low light in general. when taking pics with my kodak it always seems pretty light outside to me... but when i looked at the pics.. wow they were really dark.