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View Full Version : Spring board diving with my 85mm 1.8



Spinning
01-08-2010, 05:22 AM
These are better than my other lens but still need a lot of work. I think maybe I should have gone with the 50mm. I really had to move to the back of the staduim so this could be a problem with high school pools.....but that starts next year....so maybe another lense in my future.
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c225/Sondracot/IMG_1687.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c225/Sondracot/IMG_1689.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c225/Sondracot/IMG_1656.jpg
http://i28.photobucket.com/albums/c225/Sondracot/IMG_1674.jpg

Nickcanada
01-08-2010, 05:57 AM
You could probably stand closer and just get some tighter crops. There is a lot that could be trimmed. And they are underexposed.

Spinning
01-08-2010, 06:04 AM
Thanks. I know I could move around and in but all of these kids are not consistant with their dives so some times they are farther out, or closer to the board...I did try to stand and shoot at different spots.
I know I am still trying tofigure out the lighting and settings. I am not the greatest at all of this...so any help would be great!

laydros
01-08-2010, 06:23 AM
What mode are you shooting? I'm at work and don't have a good EXIF viewer, but I did see it came off the 50D. I might shoot in Tv mode at about 1/300 of a second, ISO 800 (or 1000 if you need it). Get tight, and if they come out this underexposed raise the EV by 2/3 or 1 full stop (half-press the shutter and move the bigger wheel on the back). Let the camera do the work, and you work on nailing focus (which seems ok on these) and picking the right moment (that is the hard part, and why some people get paid lots of money to shoot sports).

I agree that closer would be good. It is nice to have some wide shots so you can see the surroundings, but most diving shots (most sports in general in fact) are tight, with the participant filling most of the frame.

Maybe someone else can chime in with info on how to handle focusing... probably AI Servo mode, but I haven't ever really learned how to properly use it (I almost exclusively use center point).

Nickcanada
01-08-2010, 06:27 AM
Well here is a tip that improved my exposures. Use "highlight warning" feature when reviewing your pictures on the LCD. The overexposed parts in the image will flash. It's okay to have parts flashing parts in it but try to get the exposure almost to the point where the main subject starts to flash but isn't.

VTEC_EATER
01-08-2010, 07:10 AM
If it were me, I would up the ISO to 800 or 1000 minimum. You were at 400 in all of these shots. That 50D is very clean up to around 1600, so don't be afraid to use it. That higher ISO will allow faster shutter speeds, or stopping down the lens from f/1.8. I would recommend a bit of both. Since all your shots are about 2/3's to a full stop underexposed, I would recommend ISO1600, f/2.5, 1/400. That should net you an additional 2/3's stop more light ,and will help with getting a bit sharper images with the faster shutter speeds and additional aperture.

Edit, I edited one of your photos to show a 2/3rd stop of additional exposure, then did some very basic levels and contrast adjustments:

jwhite
01-08-2010, 09:36 AM
If it were me, I would up the ISO to 800 or 1000 minimum. You were at 400 in all of these shots. That 50D is very clean up to around 1600, so don't be afraid to use it. That higher ISO will allow faster shutter speeds, or stopping down the lens from f/1.8. I would recommend a bit of both. Since all your shots are about 2/3's to a full stop underexposed, I would recommend ISO1600, f/2.5, 1/400. That should net you an additional 2/3's stop more light ,and will help with getting a bit sharper images with the faster shutter speeds and additional aperture.

Edit, I edited one of your photos to show a 2/3rd stop of additional exposure, then did some very basic levels and contrast adjustments:

I agree with everything said above. Def needs more exposure and also a tighter crop. The last picture was getting there on the crop, but you can also see the shutter speed wasn't quite fast enough. The ISO 1600 f/2.5 1/400 is probably a good starting point. You could also shoot in RAW to have more play with it until you start nailing the exposure.

Jason

Spinning
01-08-2010, 10:26 AM
Thanks Everyone! This is the help I need! I think once I get use to the feel of the lens and camera I will be able to stand closer and get it tighter.
I will be at a different pool Sunday night so I will give it try again....I know I have some I shot at higher ISO I will have to see if I can figure out which ones.

adam75south
01-08-2010, 11:13 AM
it's already been said, but i'd be shooting ISO 1600 at a minimum. the faster the shutter, the better. ISO 1600 is more than clean enough on the 50d. and don't hesitate to bump it to ISO 3200 if you need to...though i think 1600 would be about right here.

another thing you might think of is setting your focus manually so you don't have to worry about it as you're shooting.

also, i think if it were me i'd take a different angle on the shot if possible. if you can i'd try to get more level with the diver.

Flossmoor40D
01-08-2010, 01:15 PM
also, i think if it were me i'd take a different angle on the shot if possible. if you can i'd try to get more level with the diver.

I couldn't agree more. Looking down at the divers (as you are in most of these pics just doesn't feel right). Obviously you will need to move around a bit depending upon which boards your subjects are on but being level with the diver will make the pictures feel right in my opinion.

michaelb
01-08-2010, 06:00 PM
Great advice has already been given.


My advice (which mirrors much of that has been said above):

1. Get closer to the divers.

2. Up ISO to 1600, shutter speed around 400.

3. Shoot in manual mode and as Nick advises "expose to the right" - especially when shooting at high ISO if you can slightly overexpose the image in camera you will get much nicer images - however, that may not be possible given the crappy lighting that your probably shooting in.

4. For this type of action I would recommend setting your custom functions such that the shutter button only trips the shutter and doesn't activate the focus - In that way you use the AF-on button for focusing and the shutter button only trips the shutter - separating these two functions is helpful when shooting action in my opinion....

http://www.usa.canon.com/dlc/controller?act=GetArticleAct&articleID=2286

cabn12
01-09-2010, 11:58 AM
when I saw the title of this thread I thought I'd see you going off the spring board with your 80mm 1.8. I was disappointed. :-)