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View Full Version : Big difference between Nikon type D and G lenses?



sherlock
02-02-2005, 01:57 PM
Hi,

I am looking for a new lens for my camera. I've seen that Nikon makes type "D" and type "G" lenes, and the only difference I can find is that type "D" have an aperture ring on the lens while the type "G" does not. Is this a desireable feature considering that aperture can be controlled from the camera body? Any input is appreciated, Thanks!!!


Andrew S.

Ant
02-03-2005, 02:21 AM
If your camera can control aperture then the manual aperture ring an a D type lens is totally useless. It isn't used at all.

Samuel Lo
02-03-2005, 09:22 AM
Hi,

I am looking for a new lens for my camera. I've seen that Nikon makes type "D" and type "G" lenes, and the only difference I can find is that type "D" have an aperture ring on the lens while the type "G" does not. Is this a desireable feature considering that aperture can be controlled from the camera body? Any input is appreciated, Thanks!!!


Andrew S.

G series is Nikon's newly designed lens. The D series is the older line, which Nikon want to have backward compatibility, that means some older camera, including FM2 can use these lens; it's also a feature for some "neoclassical" users, who want to shoot in manual mode and change the aperture throught the aperture ring just like the "good old days". (it's also applicable to digital camera, like D2X or D70, but remember you can only use the "M" mode) If you do not the habit, just buy the G series, it's just the same; and you get one benefit: no need to worry about forget to lock the aperture ring to the orange mark.

Rhys
02-03-2005, 09:56 AM
G series is Nikon's newly designed lens. The D series is the older line, which Nikon want to have backward compatibility, that means some older camera, including FM2 can use these lens; it's also a feature for some "neoclassical" users, who want to shoot in manual mode and change the aperture throught the aperture ring just like the "good old days". (it's also applicable to digital camera, like D2X or D70, but remember you can only use the "M" mode) If you do not the habit, just buy the G series, it's just the same; and you get one benefit: no need to worry about forget to lock the aperture ring to the orange mark.

Bah! Every time I hear about Nikon lenses, I hear of intercompatibility issues. Sure, I know some elderly Nikkor lenses won't fit on some of the later AI cameras that didn't have the flip-down AI indexer. But Nikon seems to be building incompatibility into their system deliberately. If Pentax can make a DSLR that takes older screw-mount and K-Mount lenses then so too can Nikon.

10 years ago, Canon decided to start a completely new lens system with their EOS AF cameras. That was awful at the time, for Canon MF owners but seems to have allowed Canon to make some very nice lenses. All of Canon's EOS lenses are compatible with their DSLRs.

Nikon, it seems to me, is making a diabolical mess of things. I can't tell which lenses will fit which cameras any more. As I've said before, there's no way in Hell that I'd ever buy a Nikon DSLR since they seem to want to force me to abandon my perfectly good Nikon lenses in order to replace them with unwanted Nikon digital lenses.

I look at Canon with interest and the budding Olympus system with even more interest.

D70FAN
02-03-2005, 10:21 AM
Bah! Every time I hear about Nikon lenses, I hear of intercompatibility issues. Sure, I know some elderly Nikkor lenses won't fit on some of the later AI cameras that didn't have the flip-down AI indexer. But Nikon seems to be building incompatibility into their system deliberately. If Pentax can make a DSLR that takes older screw-mount and K-Mount lenses then so too can Nikon.

10 years ago, Canon decided to start a completely new lens system with their EOS AF cameras. That was awful at the time, for Canon MF owners but seems to have allowed Canon to make some very nice lenses. All of Canon's EOS lenses are compatible with their DSLRs.

Nikon, it seems to me, is making a diabolical mess of things. I can't tell which lenses will fit which cameras any more. As I've said before, there's no way in Hell that I'd ever buy a Nikon DSLR since they seem to want to force me to abandon my perfectly good Nikon lenses in order to replace them with unwanted Nikon digital lenses.

I look at Canon with interest and the budding Olympus system with even more interest.

Seems we've been down this road before. I don't think that AF Nikkor lenses made in the past 10 years have any compatibility issues either. ;)

erichlund
02-03-2005, 12:15 PM
Bah! Every time I hear about Nikon lenses, I hear of intercompatibility issues. Sure, I know some elderly Nikkor lenses won't fit on some of the later AI cameras that didn't have the flip-down AI indexer. But Nikon seems to be building incompatibility into their system deliberately. If Pentax can make a DSLR that takes older screw-mount and K-Mount lenses then so too can Nikon.

10 years ago, Canon decided to start a completely new lens system with their EOS AF cameras. That was awful at the time, for Canon MF owners but seems to have allowed Canon to make some very nice lenses. All of Canon's EOS lenses are compatible with their DSLRs.

Nikon, it seems to me, is making a diabolical mess of things. I can't tell which lenses will fit which cameras any more. As I've said before, there's no way in Hell that I'd ever buy a Nikon DSLR since they seem to want to force me to abandon my perfectly good Nikon lenses in order to replace them with unwanted Nikon digital lenses.

I look at Canon with interest and the budding Olympus system with even more interest.

Oh, for Pete's sake!!! I have a Canon A-1. It takes FD lenses. Then there's MF lenses which I couldn't use. Then there's the EOS line. Before FD, I'm sure there was something else. But those I've mentioned are only from the late 70's on. Three completely different systems! If I've read correctly, I can use Nikon lenses from as early as 1964 on my D70. I can't always use the full technology of my camera with each lens, but I can use the glass. True, there are a few lenses in one particular series that I cannot use. Film and future full frame DSLRs will not be able to use DX lenses. But these are MINOR aberrations compared to the way Canon changes mounts. I suspect when Andre Agassi stops playing tennis, Canon will come out with a new designer line.

Cheers,
Eric

Samuel Lo
02-06-2005, 09:53 AM
Bah! Every time I hear about Nikon lenses, I hear of intercompatibility issues. Sure, I know some elderly Nikkor lenses won't fit on some of the later AI cameras that didn't have the flip-down AI indexer. But Nikon seems to be building incompatibility into their system deliberately. If Pentax can make a DSLR that takes older screw-mount and K-Mount lenses then so too can Nikon.

10 years ago, Canon decided to start a completely new lens system with their EOS AF cameras. That was awful at the time, for Canon MF owners but seems to have allowed Canon to make some very nice lenses. All of Canon's EOS lenses are compatible with their DSLRs.

Nikon, it seems to me, is making a diabolical mess of things. I can't tell which lenses will fit which cameras any more. As I've said before, there's no way in Hell that I'd ever buy a Nikon DSLR since they seem to want to force me to abandon my perfectly good Nikon lenses in order to replace them with unwanted Nikon digital lenses.

I look at Canon with interest and the budding Olympus system with even more interest.

Hey, it not the case. For Nikon, new model can always take old Lens, not the vice-versa except DX series, which is for DSLR only (Kodak's DSC14n cannot use the DX Lens for it's full frame size CCD, but it is not made by Nikon!) My D100 can accept the Lens that I bought in 1977!

Rhys
02-06-2005, 10:27 AM
Hey, it not the case. For Nikon, new model can always take old Lens, not the vice-versa except DX series, which is for DSLR only (Kodak's DSC14n cannot use the DX Lens for it's full frame size CCD, but it is not made by Nikon!) My D100 can accept the Lens that I bought in 1977!


Yes. It'll accept the lens. But it won't work with it. You have to guess the exosure or use a separate exposure meter - so you're pretty much using a Nikkormat F with Nikkor Q lenses but it's a darned lot more expensive.

Samuel Lo
02-06-2005, 07:05 PM
Yes. It'll accept the lens. But it won't work with it. You have to guess the exosure or use a separate exposure meter - so you're pretty much using a Nikkormat F with Nikkor Q lenses but it's a darned lot more expensive.


I'm talking about new camera using old Lens, NOT old camera using new Lens! And I can use the new D AF lens with my antique F3 with manual focus, but the exposure meter works fine! If I only have a Nikkomat, I will only buy second hand old Lens, absolutely not so stupid to buy the new AF Lens for the Nikkomat.
I agree that there is still having some limitation, but, who else can do the things better? Canon, Pentax, Olympus, Minolta, Leica or Contax? Can a Canon T90 use EF?

Rhys
02-07-2005, 06:20 AM
I'm talking about new camera using old Lens, NOT old camera using new Lens! And I can use the new D AF lens with my antique F3 with manual focus, but the exposure meter works fine! If I only have a Nikkomat, I will only buy second hand old Lens, absolutely not so stupid to buy the new AF Lens for the Nikkomat.
I agree that there is still having some limitation, but, who else can do the things better? Canon, Pentax, Olympus, Minolta, Leica or Contax? Can a Canon T90 use EF?

Ah, there's been a misunderstanding.

I was repeating what Nikon stated in an email to me. The new digital cameras will not work with MF lenses. Sure - they'll fit onto the body but they won't work with it. Focussing has to be done by guesstimation as there's absolutely no focussing aid. Exposure has to be guesstimated or calculated via a separate light meter. The only mode available is manual and there is no automatic metering available.

As I said, you have an expensive D70 / D100 and when you have a MF Nikon lens on it, it works just the same as a Nikkormat F would with a Nikkor Q lens - except that the Nikkormat F was better in that it had a split screen to help with focussing.

Thus, Nikon lens intercompatibility is a cynical ploy to screw more money from hard-pressed punters. since Nikon's played that dirty trick, I'm certainly not buying Nikon ever again. I don't hold a company that thumbs its nose at its customers in such a way in anything other than contempt.

Back in the 1980s when home computers came out, the various companies produced newer and upgraded models every year. Then people found that none of the software they had bought for the previous model would work on them and that they'd have to buy new software. That was pretty much when the home computer revolution died out. People just weren't going to be conned into buying a new computer when they had to buy new software for it. Many people have PCs now and the software they use gets transferred carefully to the next PC, when they upgrade. I've used Word97 on Windows 95/98/XP and NT - transferring each time. Of course, as Word97 doesn't want to work too well under XP, have I bought Word XP? Certainly not! I went for Open Office, which is better and also free.

Nikon will rapidly lose its market share by playing the dangerous and cynical ploy of mocking its customers. Nikon has certainly got one ex-customer here who won't be niKONned.

Ant
02-07-2005, 08:37 AM
Ah, there's been a misunderstanding.

Thus, Nikon lens intercompatibility is a cynical ploy to screw more money from hard-pressed punters. since Nikon's played that dirty trick, I'm certainly not buying Nikon ever again. I don't hold a company that thumbs its nose at its customers in such a way in anything other than contempt.

Back in the 1980s when home computers came out, the various companies produced newer and upgraded models every year. Then people found that none of the software they had bought for the previous model would work on them and that they'd have to buy new software. That was pretty much when the home computer revolution died out. People just weren't going to be conned into buying a new computer when they had to buy new software for it. Many people have PCs now and the software they use gets transferred carefully to the next PC, when they upgrade. I've used Word97 on Windows 95/98/XP and NT - transferring each time. Of course, as Word97 doesn't want to work too well under XP, have I bought Word XP? Certainly not! I went for Open Office, which is better and also free.

Nikon will rapidly lose its market share by playing the dangerous and cynical ploy of mocking its customers. Nikon has certainly got one ex-customer here who won't be niKONned.

I think you're really going way over the top here.

As has been previously mentioned Nikon is actually one of the better companies when it comes to lens compatibility, with many others you simply can't use the lens at all. At least you can still use the glass with manual focus and metering on a Nikon.

As for it being a deliberate and cynical ploy that's just total rubbish. It's just a case of advancing with the times. I suppose you won't buy Ford cars either because you can't buy new brake drums for your 1966 Ford Anglia :rolleyes:

I don't know what planet you're on but the rest of us accepts that technology advances.....sometimes you can factor in some reverse compatibility, sometimes you can't. If a company finds a new and better way of doing something, but which isn't backward compatible; do they simply give up and not bother doing it, or go ahead and introduce the new and better technology. I'll give you a clue what every single company does if you don't know the answer to that one :rolleyes:

As for your PC analogy, that's wrong as well. The home computer revolution did not die out, it has gone from strength to strength and there's less backward compatibility in that than you seem to realise too.

It's true that there's been a relatively long period (in PC terms) of compatibility between windows 95, 98, NT, ME and 2000, but that's about to end. As you've already figured out Windows XP can't run some of the previous stuff and it's going to get far worse when 64bit processors are the norm; and let's not forget that when those operating systems were introduced they rendered a whole load of good old 8bit DOS programs obsolete too.

Is this relentless advance of technology merely a cynical corporate trick to get us to dump our old stuff and buy new stuff?.....to a degree, yes it is; but what's the alternative, remain in the dark ages?...."I'm sorry but we really can't bring out a new faster computer because it won't run on whale oil that everybody is still using for power" :rolleyes:

This is the world we live in. If you're going to boycott every company that introduces new technology without backward compatibility then good luck to you because you'll soon be living in a cave eating grass.

Your view has a certain point but you seriously need to get a sense of perspective!!!

idssms
02-13-2005, 12:57 PM
My D100 accepts most Nikkor lenses. I have used friends old Nikkor lenses and had zero problems.

Check out some of my recent photos here on my webshots:


http://community.webshots.com/user/irwind101

don

Rhys
02-13-2005, 01:12 PM
My D100 accepts most Nikkor lenses. I have used friends old Nikkor lenses and had zero problems.

Check out some of my recent photos here on my webshots:


http://community.webshots.com/user/irwind101

don

Ok. Take a 50mm f1.8 AIS lens. What can you do with it on a D100? Can you use aperture priority, shutter priority, program and manual modes. What about focus confirmation?

erichlund
02-13-2005, 02:16 PM
Ok. Take a 50mm f1.8 AIS lens. What can you do with it on a D100? Can you use aperture priority, shutter priority, program and manual modes. What about focus confirmation?

Manual only. Manual focus, manual aperture (as in set it on the lens, because it has no way to tell the camera, it's a non-cpu lens.) Since it doesn't tell the camera diddly, BYOM (bring your own meter). Of course, since AIS lenses were Nikon in cheap mode, and you can get a reasonably current 50mm f1.8 for < $100, the only one who really cares are those with a bunch of old lenses they want to make use of. None of this is a serious disadvantage. You couldn't do much more on the cameras they were designed for.

Rhys, I sense you have a bunch of stone age lenses and your bitter because they are no longer the bee knees (a stone age term). Well I have a bunch of Canon FD lenses that are useless on anything that Canon currently produces. In fact, they won't even mount on the camera. Big Deal. Move on.

Cheers,
Eric

Rhys
02-13-2005, 02:54 PM
Manual only. Manual focus, manual aperture (as in set it on the lens, because it has no way to tell the camera, it's a non-cpu lens.) Since it doesn't tell the camera diddly, BYOM (bring your own meter). Of course, since AIS lenses were Nikon in cheap mode, and you can get a reasonably current 50mm f1.8 for < $100, the only one who really cares are those with a bunch of old lenses they want to make use of. None of this is a serious disadvantage. You couldn't do much more on the cameras they were designed for.

Rhys, I sense you have a bunch of stone age lenses and your bitter because they are no longer the bee knees (a stone age term). Well I have a bunch of Canon FD lenses that are useless on anything that Canon currently produces. In fact, they won't even mount on the camera. Big Deal. Move on.

Cheers,
Eric

Yes. Back to what I was saying before about the D70/D100 being pretty much a very expensive Nikkor F (the one without the meter).

And yes. It is a big deal. I spent over 2,000 on those lenses that you so casually dismiss and money does not grow on trees. I scimped and saved - went without food many times in order to buy those lenses.

Samuel Lo
02-14-2005, 08:30 AM
Yes. Back to what I was saying before about the D70/D100 being pretty much a very expensive Nikkor F (the one without the meter).

And yes. It is a big deal. I spent over 2,000 on those lenses that you so casually dismiss and money does not grow on trees. I scimped and saved - went without food many times in order to buy those lenses.

OK,OK, then please don't buy any camera, computer, mobile phone ... any technology stuff, for they will be outdated sooner or later; just use pencil and paper, and use canvas instead of camera, then you will feel better and save all your hard earn money.
Wait a minute, is it a forum for DSLR or sociology? Can we close the case and back to talking about the difference between Nikon's D and G Lens ONLY?

Rhys
02-14-2005, 08:52 AM
OK,OK, then please don't buy any camera, computer, mobile phone ... any technology stuff, for they will be outdated sooner or later; just use pencil and paper, and use canvas instead of camera, then you will feel better and save all your hard earn money.

This is not the point and you well know it.

erichlund
02-14-2005, 09:01 AM
I didn't mean to dismiss them entirely. But don't ask them to do something they never could do. I'm sure there's a great deal of fine glass in your collection. But glass that was designed for manual focus and manual settings is not suddenly going to take on all new characteristics.

If I were to make a decision about all this glass, I'd have to ask: "Which Nikon camera will make the best use of the manual nature of my lenses?" In that regard, it seems that Nikon has chosen to leave manual focusing behind for its digital series. I'm not familiar with Nikons terminology for their focusing screens, but none of the digitals seem to specify split prism screens, even the high end pro models. The F5 has some 14 different screens that can be used, but that's film, expensive and heavy.

So, if your eyes are like mine, you may have to consider the Fuji or Kodak compatible cameras, though, I don't know if they are any better. I understand the D100 at least has a bigger viewfinder than the D70. Perhaps there will be a worthy entry later this month, announced at PMA.

My investment was in Canon. My Canon 50mm f1.4 FD is as good a lens as I've ever used, including the Nikon 50mm f1.8D. Any other lens, I know I'm looking through a lens. With the Canon 50, it's like the camera disappears and I'm just looking through a clear frame. Perhaps it was to my advantage that old Canon lenses are TOTALLY incompatible with ANYTHING new. What's past is past. I chose autofocus to go forward, so I'm in a completely new system.

Technology changes. It's sad that your Nikon lenses are not as useful on a new camera as they could be, but at least you didn't have Canon lenses that you couldn't use at all.

Cheers,
Eric

Rhys
02-14-2005, 09:22 AM
I didn't mean to dismiss them entirely. But don't ask them to do something they never could do. I'm sure there's a great deal of fine glass in your collection. But glass that was designed for manual focus and manual settings is not suddenly going to take on all new characteristics.

If I were to make a decision about all this glass, I'd have to ask: "Which Nikon camera will make the best use of the manual nature of my lenses?" In that regard, it seems that Nikon has chosen to leave manual focusing behind for its digital series. I'm not familiar with Nikons terminology for their focusing screens, but none of the digitals seem to specify split prism screens, even the high end pro models. The F5 has some 14 different screens that can be used, but that's film, expensive and heavy.

So, if your eyes are like mine, you may have to consider the Fuji or Kodak compatible cameras, though, I don't know if they are any better. I understand the D100 at least has a bigger viewfinder than the D70. Perhaps there will be a worthy entry later this month, announced at PMA.

My investment was in Canon. My Canon 50mm f1.4 FD is as good a lens as I've ever used, including the Nikon 50mm f1.8D. Any other lens, I know I'm looking through a lens. With the Canon 50, it's like the camera disappears and I'm just looking through a clear frame. Perhaps it was to my advantage that old Canon lenses are TOTALLY incompatible with ANYTHING new. What's past is past. I chose autofocus to go forward, so I'm in a completely new system.

Technology changes. It's sad that your Nikon lenses are not as useful on a new camera as they could be, but at least you didn't have Canon lenses that you couldn't use at all.

Cheers,
Eric

I find it interesting that on the D70 and D100, MF lenses are unsupported yet on the D1 and D2 I gather they are supported.

I don't know whether the Kodaks will support them. I guess I'll have to wait until prices fall sufficiently for them to be affordable. Having struggled so hard to obtain my Nikon glass, I'm loath to sell it for less than it's worth and I'm loath to gabandon it.

Samuel Lo
02-14-2005, 09:54 AM
This is not the point and you well know it.\]]

Yup, I think we all know the fact; but, what can we do? We have to be realistic.

Rhys
02-14-2005, 10:22 AM
\]]

Yup, I think we all know the fact; but, what can we do? We have to be realistic.

I think there's a fair chance - given the sheer volume of Nikon MF glass out there, that Nikon might just produce a digital camera with MF. Epson has led the way with their MF Leica M4P clone.

Samuel Lo
02-14-2005, 10:36 AM
I think there's a fair chance - given the sheer volume of Nikon MF glass out there, that Nikon might just produce a digital camera with MF. Epson has led the way with their MF Leica M4P clone.

Oh, the R-D1, I have one; but please look at the price tag- nearly US$3,000, which can buy a collection of new Nikon Lenses. and it's manual focus... I bought it just for the quality of Leica Lenses, not because of Epson.

D70FAN
02-14-2005, 10:53 AM
I think there's a fair chance - given the sheer volume of Nikon MF glass out there, that Nikon might just produce a digital camera with MF. Epson has led the way with their MF Leica M4P clone.

If you are talking about the Epson-Voigtlander RD-1, I think it is an M2 clone.

So would you actually be willing to spend $3000 to re-use your MF lenses? Or do you mean that Nikon will come out with a consumer level (and cost) dSLR that will be able to use MF lenses?

I have to admit it Rhys, with the extremely "bargain basement" prices for AI and AIS lenses I wouldn't mind seeing a low cost digital with MF lens capability as well. :) But I just don't see Nikon going there. But maybe Fuji with a Nikon mount and older Super CCD?

NewTekBuzz
02-14-2005, 10:56 AM
Hey Samuel... AOL rooms down the hall to the left!! wanna pick a fight, go there :eek:

Samuel Lo
02-14-2005, 11:00 AM
Hey Samuel... AOL rooms down the hall to the left!! wanna pick a fight, go there :eek:

Sorry, we are all gentleman, ain't we? :)

Rhys
02-14-2005, 11:23 AM
If you are talking about the Epson-Voigtlander RD-1, I think it is an M2 clone.

So would you actually be willing to spend $3000 to re-use your MF lenses? Or do you mean that Nikon will come out with a consumer level (and cost) dSLR that will be able to use MF lenses?

I have to admit it Rhys, with the extremely "bargain basement" prices for AI and AIS lenses I wouldn't mind seeing a low cost digital with MF lens capability as well. :) But I just don't see Nikon going there. But maybe Fuji with a Nikon mount and older Super CCD?

I have just suggested to Nikon's R&D department that there're a lot of MF lenses out there and thus a market share that they're missing out on.

I suggested some while ago to them there could be a market for something like what eventually turned up as the Nikon 3100 - about 6 months before the 3100 came out.

They do appear to listen to the public.

D70FAN
02-14-2005, 11:27 AM
Hey Samuel... AOL rooms down the hall to the left!! wanna pick a fight, go there :eek:

I think Rhys can defend himself. God knows he's been doing it for about 2 years. It's getting to the point where I'm agreeing with him more often, so maybe it's time for a vacation or better anti-hallucinogens. ;)

P.S.

Or maybe... He's right! Doh!

NewTekBuzz
02-14-2005, 03:55 PM
:) I love this board. you guys are really great, Samuel... & rhys hope you know i was just playing!!

Samuel Lo
02-15-2005, 11:09 AM
I have just suggested to Nikon's R&D department that there're a lot of MF lenses out there and thus a market share that they're missing out on.

I suggested some while ago to them there could be a market for something like what eventually turned up as the Nikon 3100 - about 6 months before the 3100 came out.

They do appear to listen to the public.

Oh, Thanks, Rhys.
I hope that's come true.

Rhys
02-15-2005, 11:24 AM
Oh, Thanks, Rhys.
I hope that's come true.

The more people that would like a dSLR that takes and uses all the functions of a MF lens and which can be used as though it was an F3 or FE or FM2 the better. We must all write to Nikon. I suggest contacting tech support in every country and letting them know what we want.

For myself I want either:

1. A digital version of the F3 that works exactly like the F3 but uses AA batteries. A review LCD would be handy.
2. A digital version of the F3 that runs on AA batteries but which has an EVF.

The former would be especially useful as it's a low-drain device that would enable the camera to be used in remote locations where there's no electrical supply and where the photographer could be camping for months. A supply of lithium AAs would be all he'd need.

D70FAN
02-15-2005, 12:56 PM
The more people that would like a dSLR that takes and uses all the functions of a MF lens and which can be used as though it was an F3 or FE or FM2 the better. We must all write to Nikon. I suggest contacting tech support in every country and letting them know what we want.

For myself I want either:

1. A digital version of the F3 that works exactly like the F3 but uses AA batteries. A review LCD would be handy.
2. A digital version of the F3 that runs on AA batteries but which has an EVF.

The former would be especially useful as it's a low-drain device that would enable the camera to be used in remote locations where there's no electrical supply and where the photographer could be camping for months. A supply of lithium AAs would be all he'd need.

Or better yet RCRV-3's (rechargable CRV-3), as then you can also use AA's in a pinch.

Rhys
02-15-2005, 01:10 PM
Or better yet RCRV-3's (rechargable CRV-3), as then you can also use AA's in a pinch.

Now that's a really good idea. I'd have looked into RCRV-3s if my S1 would have taken them because I know my 3100 probably would. Unfortunately, the S1 battery compatment is just not laid out well enough to use two. I'd have to use one and 2 AA batteries or do what I do now and use 4 AAs.

gary_hendricks
02-17-2005, 06:35 AM
Now that's a really good idea. I'd have looked into RCRV-3s if my S1 would have taken them because I know my 3100 probably would. Unfortunately, the S1 battery compatment is just not laid out well enough to use two. I'd have to use one and 2 AA batteries or do what I do now and use 4 AAs.

Gosh this is one interesting debate going on here! I didn't know lens compatibility was such a hot topic! :)

Samuel Lo
02-17-2005, 10:50 AM
Gosh this is one interesting debate going on here! I didn't know lens compatibility was such a hot topic! :)

Gary, you were late, I think this thread was end.

sherlock
02-18-2005, 12:30 PM
Hi everyone,

I've never had such a replied-to forum! I'm glad I could get a debate going! :)


Andrew S.