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Rex914
01-31-2005, 07:52 PM
This is general survey to help me and anybody else interested in Canon D-SLR's to get a sense of what people own and what they like.

1) What Canon D-SLR(s) do you own?
2) What lenses do you own? Why did you pick them?
3) Which lens do you use the most?
4) What do you do with your camera?
5) Do you carry along any other accessories? (Flashes, tripods, etc.)

calvin
02-01-2005, 07:50 AM
This is general survey to help me and anybody else interested in Canon D-SLR's to get a sense of what people own and what they like.

1) What Canon D-SLR(s) do you own?
2) What lenses do you own? Why did you pick them?
3) Which lens do you use the most?
4) What do you do with your camera?
5) Do you carry along any other accessories? (Flashes, tripods, etc.)

What I carry (to a shoot, event or travel):

Body: Canon 10d with BG-ED3 (vertical grip)
Lenses: Canon 17-40/4L, Canon 70-200/4L, Canon 50/1.8 (for various reasons... sometimes I substitute my Canon 100/2.8 USM macro)
Lens used most: Canon 17-40/4L. For the 1.6x focal length multiplier, this is a great walk-around lens and is very sharp.
What do I do: Fashion / portraits, travel
Other accessories: Canon 480EX flash, mini tripod, Stofen Omnibounce for diffusing, Off-shoe camera cord 2, Sekonic L358 lightmeter.
Bag: Lowepro CompuTrekker AW or Mini Trekker (depending on whether I'm carrying my 12" laptop)

eagle17
02-02-2005, 08:15 AM
Body: Canon 20D with BG-ED2 (vertical grip)
Lenses: Sigma 18-125, Canon 70-200/4L, Canon 50/1.8 (adding 100-400 IS L and 16-35 f2.8L this year)
Lens used most: Canon 70-200 F4L. Sharp and good range for taking shots of outdoor wildlife. I also use it for outdoor candids.
What do I do: Prortraits, candids, wildlife shots.
Other accessories: Canon 550EX flash, mini tripod, large bogen tripod, Stofen Omnibounce for diffusing, Portrait studio in basement with backgrounds, novatron light system.
Bag: Small backpack style bag from ritz camera..

ReF
02-06-2005, 01:17 AM
This is general survey to help me and anybody else interested in Canon D-SLR's to get a sense of what people own and what they like.

1) What Canon D-SLR(s) do you own?
2) What lenses do you own? Why did you pick them?
3) Which lens do you use the most?
4) What do you do with your camera?
5) Do you carry along any other accessories? (Flashes, tripods, etc.)

1. digital rebel: picked this up mainly because of it's low price. i could barely afford it after purchasing the lenses i wanted. i mainly shoot landscapes/scenery so the features that this cam is missing from the 10D really aren't that important to me. it is strong where it counts: picture quality (for me at least).
2. canon 17-40L: need a wide angle lens that is sharp and resistant to flare. the problem with this lens is that max sharpness is reached at around f8, so as you decrease the aperture size to increase DOF for landscapes, it's sharpness drops noticably.
canon 28-135 IS: covers a nice range, with the 1.6 crop factor this = decent telephoto power with IS. stabilization is an important and often used feature for me and the lens is much sharper than i expected. this lens and the 17-40L also happened to add $100 each in rebates(plus $120 for the two lenses themselves) when purchased with the rebel so this set up was really a steal.
canon 50mm f1.8: this is actually a lens left over from my earlier canon film SLR that it is from the late 80's - early 90's so it is pretty solidly built with a proper focusing ring. yes it is old but it does have coatings and flare is non-existent, as it should be. this is my only fast aperture lens and is very useful for indoor and people pictures(good blur). this lens makes me wish my other lenses had fast apertures.
canon 17-85 IS: actually, i will be sending this lens back in two days, but i rather enjoyed using it. it covers a very nice range, has IS, and is extremely flare-resistant for a wide angle lens. it blows the 28-135 IS away in terms of flare resistance and believe it or not, sits right up there with the 17-40L. the problem with this lens is that saturation, sharpness, and contrast (in it's many forms) are not as good as the 28-135 IS.
3. i switch all three lenses on and off pretty often but usually the 28-135 IS gets the most on-camera time at home. a telephoto lens is pretty fun to play around with, especially if it is stabilized. the 17-40L gets the most use when i'm actually out shooting landscapes/scenery.
4. other than what i have already mentioned i take pictures of my pets doing weird things.
5. most importantly i have a large but cheap tripod which i bought when i didn't think i'd end up with a d-slr. it works well enough in windy situations and is tall enough to use without having to extend the center column more than 8 inhes. i have a HOYA circular polarizing filter and an infrared filter that i have left over from the a80, but they're only 58mm so it only fits on the 50mm lens. a thin 77mm HOYA circular polarizer costs around $130!!!!!! :mad: so i can't really afford a replacement just yet. i don't have any flashes because my indoor shots are just for fun. I will soon be getting a 40gb portable storage device for my up coming trip since the 800mb in compact flash that i have is only enough for about 1 day's worth of shooting in RAW.
i carry everything besides the tripod in a small across-the-shoulder style backpack, which is very comfortable and is more low-key. i will be getting something zippered (going to the desert) with more padding, though i still don't want people to know i'm carrying expensive equipment on my back.

Rhys
02-06-2005, 07:12 AM
i will be getting something zippered (going to the desert) with more padding, though i still don't want people to know i'm carrying expensive equipment on my back.

If you're worried about protection, do what I do with cameras.

Get one of the closed-cell foam sleeping mats (the cheaper the better because they're thinner), cut it up to make tubes to put the lenses in and cubes to put the bodies in. Cut tops and bottoms for the tubes and cubes. Fasten them together with waterproof parcel tape then put them in a zip, plastic bag and pop them in your ordinary knapsack. It worked well enough for me, is unobrtusive and best of all - cheap.

TenD
02-06-2005, 06:14 PM
1) What Canon D-SLR(s) do you own?
Canon 10D, I decided early on when I saw this camera this was the DSLR I was going to buy. I waited quite a while to purchase the 10D as my EOS A2 and 3 were still in very good condition and worked fine. My using my G2 more than either of them convinced me it was time to get the 10D. I am still very happy with my 10D and will not upgrade until the end of the the next generations cycle.
2) What lenses do you own? Why did you pick them?

17-40 f/4L I chose this lens because it was the most economical high quality glass that would recover the wide end I was used to on my film cameras.

28-105 f/3.5-4.5, this lens followed me from my film camera and was my wide to mid zoom. I am going to sell it with an EOS 650 body soon, I find I just don't need it anymore.

50 f/1.8 Mk I fills a gap and offers good low light performance.

80-200 f/2.8L I bought this lens about 6 years ago before digital was really catching on. I bought it as an economical solution for the mid tele range, and since have found out it is one of the sharpest mid zooms ever made. I will never part with this lens, there is just something magical about it.

300 f/4L Again lower cost alternative to the I.S. version or the f/2.8 version. Also rated very sharp in many tests, provides me with a starting point for wildlife photography. A 1.4x teleconverter may be in the future to add more reach.

3) Which lens do you use the most?
I think the 17-40, it is the lens that resides on the body in my bag. The 80-200 isn't far behind though. I like the perspective and feel I get from pictures taken with the 80-200 it would probably be next.
4) What do you do with your camera?
I take photographs with it, silly:D. Nature and wildlife mostly, some candid portraits, and some sports.
5) Do you carry along any other accessories? (Flashes, tripods, etc.)
Depends on the mood and the subject. I always have my tripod in the car so it's close by, I take a mono pod when I am hiking. I carry a microfiber cloth, lens brush, glittens(gloves without fingers with mitten covers), a headlamp(for the hike to the location in the morning and the hike back in the evening), remote release, .3 and .6 grad neutral density filters with Cokin holder, polarizing filters for all of my lenses, my G2(just in case and for snaps), and my laptop if I am on a multi day trip. I am not much for flash but I will be purchasing a 550EX soon and it will squeeze in my bag somewhere, as I am becoming more and more intrigued with flash photography. So far all of this fits in my Lowepro computrekker.

I am very happy with this kit and consider it finished as it stands although as stated above I would like to add a 1.4x teleconverter and an external flash.
A 70-300 DO lens might present a powerful lens for a lot of situations and as a travel light lens.
A 35 f/1.4L or 35 f/2 would present a good low light normal lens for indoor use.
I guess it really never ends does it?

ReF
02-06-2005, 11:35 PM
If you're worried about protection, do what I do with cameras.

Get one of the closed-cell foam sleeping mats (the cheaper the better because they're thinner), cut it up to make tubes to put the lenses in and cubes to put the bodies in. Cut tops and bottoms for the tubes and cubes. Fasten them together with waterproof parcel tape then put them in a zip, plastic bag and pop them in your ordinary knapsack. It worked well enough for me, is unobrtusive and best of all - cheap.

thanks Rhys, that's really a great idea! i haven't looked at all the bags yet but so far everything looks like it is obviously made for camera/camcorder equipment. or even worse, the other padded, non-camera bags have the obvious laptop look. i really don't like other people to know how much $$$ i'm carrying on my back. i also don't like to look like a tourist. thanks again :)

oh yeah, i also carry around a small piece of microfiber cloth for cleaning lens surfaces - very useful and effective.

Rex914
02-07-2005, 03:32 PM
Question about a particular camera bag.

Will Lowepro's Nova 2 comfortably fit a 20D with a 17-40L attached to it? I'll also be storing an additional lens or two inside.

ReF
02-08-2005, 05:43 PM
Question about a particular camera bag.

Will Lowepro's Nova 2 comfortably fit a 20D with a 17-40L attached to it? I'll also be storing an additional lens or two inside.

i have neither the 20d nor the lowepro bag but since there's a good chance no one will answer a question like this, let me offer that the length from the tip of the 17-40L with lens cap on to furthest protrusion on the back of the d-rebel (eyecup) is 7 5/8 inches. the length of the 17-40L itself when mounted on a camera body is almost exactly 4inches. just compare those numbers with the dimensions of the 20D and the lowepro bag and you should have a pretty good idea.

Rex914
02-08-2005, 07:47 PM
Thanks for the tip.

The 20D has 2.8" depth. Add that to the 4" for the 17-40 and we get 6.8". The Nova 2 is 8.5W x 4.25D x 7.75H in so it should barely fit. If it doesn't for whatever reason, I'll just step up to the Nova 3 which has ample room.

Got another question. Is it typical or advised to use a protective (UV) filter for my lenses or is it ok to go without one if I won't be going around in "harsh/dangerous" environments?

ktixx
02-08-2005, 11:14 PM
Got another question. Is it typical or advised to use a protective (UV) filter for my lenses or is it ok to go without one if I won't be going around in "harsh/dangerous" environments?

Certain people say that anything infront of the lens (IE: UV Filter) will degrade picture quality, they also say the loss in quality really won't be noticed unless it is for some high level professional shot. Overall I would say that if something were to happen (such as a scratch) would you rather replace a $30 filter, or a $400 lens? Basically even if you aren't in a harsh enviroment, the constant cleaning of the lens (wiping dust off) will cause minor scratches. It is easier and cheaper to replace a filter then a lens, since it won't really cause any noticable loss in picture quality, there is no reason not to use one.
Hope this helps
Ken

Rhys
02-09-2005, 06:19 AM
Certain people say that anything infront of the lens (IE: UV Filter) will degrade picture quality, they also say the loss in quality really won't be noticed unless it is for some high level professional shot. Overall I would say that if something were to happen (such as a scratch) would you rather replace a $30 filter, or a $400 lens? Basically even if you aren't in a harsh enviroment, the constant cleaning of the lens (wiping dust off) will cause minor scratches. It is easier and cheaper to replace a filter then a lens, since it won't really cause any noticable loss in picture quality, there is no reason not to use one.
Hope this helps
Ken

There is that argument. On the other hand, I did notice that UV/Skylight filters did degrade image quality. It was quite noticable to me and was therefore unacceptible. In the end, having tried mc UV filters amongst other things, I binned the filters and took better photos.

I'm more of the opinion that if a lens gets trashed, it's replacable. I'd rather have to replace a lens every few years than take soft photos.

ReF
02-11-2005, 04:46 PM
Thanks for the tip.

The 20D has 2.8" depth. Add that to the 4" for the 17-40 and we get 6.8". The Nova 2 is 8.5W x 4.25D x 7.75H in so it should barely fit. If it doesn't for whatever reason, I'll just step up to the Nova 3 which has ample room.

Got another question. Is it typical or advised to use a protective (UV) filter for my lenses or is it ok to go without one if I won't be going around in "harsh/dangerous" environments?

i'd say that for unimportant situations or harsh enviroments, it is quite acceptable to go with a protective filter. i believe that there is a slight degrade in image quality so don't use it in situations that might yield potential "trophy shots." having a lens hood attached whether you need it or not also serves as good protection from impacts. get a good multi-coated filter. i like the HOYA brand, because it is of high quality and is reasonably priced. although i'm not the kind of person who usually uses protective filters, i will be getting one for my more expensive lenses. i simply cannot afford to replace a $670 lens this soon! i will also mention that you never know when something will happen! i went to a beach that i've been to before and one time, some tiny tiny peebles/sand fell from a nearbly cliff and the wind blew it right into our faces and it hurt! now imagine if you were taking a picture and those peebles flew into your front lenses element and chipped it - you would be out several hundred dollars instantly! if you are in a harsh enviroment shooting an awesome scene then you'll have to decide whether or not the shot is worth the price of your lens, or if you can even get the shot if the lens is damaged.

jeisner
02-13-2005, 01:16 AM
I have Hoya Super HMC UV filters on all my lenses (except my fisheye) I have taken test shots with and without the Super HMC UV, and I can find no (or extremely little) noticable difference in the image quality, and I would prefer to protect the lens, as replacing a filter costs very little for me, replacing the lens is a different issue. If I had money to burn I would probably be a purist and not use them ;-)

ReF
02-13-2005, 02:05 AM
I have Hoya Super HMC UV filters on all my lenses (except my fisheye) I have taken test shots with and without the Super HMC UV, and I can find no (or extremely little) noticable difference in the image quality, and I would prefer to protect the lens, as replacing a filter costs very little for me, replacing the lens is a different issue. If I had money to burn I would probably be a purist and not use them ;-)

I also use the HOYA super HMC filters as they have some of the best coatings out there (minimal effect on picture quality).

gary_hendricks
02-13-2005, 07:19 AM
This is general survey to help me and anybody else interested in Canon D-SLR's to get a sense of what people own and what they like.

1) What Canon D-SLR(s) do you own?
2) What lenses do you own? Why did you pick them?
3) Which lens do you use the most?
4) What do you do with your camera?
5) Do you carry along any other accessories? (Flashes, tripods, etc.)

1) A Nikon D70 :)

2) I use only the two lenses:
- Wide zoom - Nikon AF-S DX Zoom-Nikkor 12-24mm f/4G IF-ED
- Telephoto zoom - Nikon AF Nikkor 70-300mm f/4-5.6G)

3) The wide zoom lense above.

4) I take mostly macro stuff, like flowers, sometimes action or sports. Occasionally pictures of landscapes, or sunsets.

5) A tripod, flash unit, 2 extra memory cards and a backup film camera. Oh, and the camera manual ;)