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View Full Version : please help on taking close-ups



shatterspeed
02-13-2009, 07:56 PM
I've never really experimented on macro photography. Earlier today, I tried to take photos of our lunch order but I couldn't seem to take a sharp one at best. I depress the shutter in half to prefocus the image, but when I fully press it, it comes out a bit blurry. My camera was a Fujifilm F31fd. I activated the 'flower' symbol and the camera/lens was about 10in. from the food. Can anyone please tell me how to take accurate-sharp photos of macros/close-ups? In addition, I tried to switch to Aperture but I was clueless of which f-stop to pick. =(

D Thompson
02-14-2009, 03:42 AM
I'm gonna guess your shutter speed was too slow. Take a look and see what your settings were and post back.

shatterspeed
02-14-2009, 07:01 AM
omg, I think it worked! I switched it to Shutter priority. But when I was googling stuff up, I kept reading the mode dial in Aperture priority. So I tried several settings on it and none seemed to work. Thanks so much for the advice D Thompson! =) I can finally experiment on macros/close-ups.

D Thompson
02-14-2009, 09:54 AM
Macro mode will increase any camera movement due to a slow shutter speed. I don't shoot much macro, but would say that any speed slower than 1/100th might affect the macro shot.

tim11
02-15-2009, 03:05 AM
I've never really experimented on macro photography. Earlier today, I tried to take photos of our lunch order but I couldn't seem to take a sharp one at best. I depress the shutter in half to prefocus the image, but when I fully press it, it comes out a bit blurry. My camera was a Fujifilm F31fd. I activated the 'flower' symbol and the camera/lens was about 10in. from the food. Can anyone please tell me how to take accurate-sharp photos of macros/close-ups? In addition, I tried to switch to Aperture but I was clueless of which f-stop to pick. =(

Try resting your hand on something steady (if a tripod isn't possible). Sure the light is low and you need to keep steady longer.
Everything else you did right. Here is one from my F30 doing exactly what you did with the mode and dial; the difference is I rested my hands on the desk.

Marsh Vegas
02-15-2009, 10:47 AM
Stupid question,
I have Hoya macro lenses I bought for my Canon A85 which I can't seem to get the handle on. Do I still use the macro option (flower symbol) if I have the lenses attached.

tim11
02-15-2009, 01:58 PM
Another thing I forgot is that when you are photographing a shiny object make sure to focus it on a point with some contrast, ie. for the case of paper make sure you focus on some black texts. And then make sure the focus lock.

Marsh Vegas: I have no experience with A85 and the macro lens but if you don't have specific answer from anyone just stick to what works better for you.

JLV
02-16-2009, 05:20 AM
With my Kodak, I have done it both ways. Using the macro setting I got a shallower depth of field.

shatterspeed
02-17-2009, 02:53 PM
Thanks so much for the tips tim11/D Thompson. I can't find my camera at the moment (I will experiment more when I find it eventually). But tim11, I just have one question. You said you used the setting I originally did (meaning on Av then), what f-stop did you use for that excellent macro of your watch? Did you apply certain settings as well such as ISO? Exp. value? Also, did you need to activate the 'flower' symbol as well? On the focusing part, I'm really sorry but I don't know how to focus on a certain part of the screen/object I'm taking a photo of. Do you mean the metering? :confused: When D Thompson said a faster shutter, I take it he meant the mode dial on, Tv, and when I tested several ones, they looked acceptable enough.

tim11
02-18-2009, 01:59 PM
Shatter, since you are quite satisfied with faster shutter, i.e. S mode on Fuji (Tv for Canon speak), then I think your problem is more likely to be hand shaking. The light is too low and you have to hold the camera steady for a fraction longer. If you post a sample of your photo then I might be able to tell you more.

This is what I always do to get macro shots. I use Aperture mode, F/2.8 and macro (flower symbol). At max. F value of 2.8 and if I'm not happy with the shutter speed I boost up ISO - the camera displays the shutter if you set it correctly. In that shot it was ISO 800.

Focus on the text? Well.... point to some prominent text and half press the shutter; that's what I meant, then hold the shutter and re-frame if necessary.

jekostas
02-21-2009, 06:07 PM
You really do need a tripod if you're doing macro photography indoors. Hands shake, and even an IS system can't always deal with it based on slower shutter speeds, and the fact that any minor shake will be magnified many times because you're focusing on such a small area.

The good news is that you can probably get away with a dollar store tabletop tripod (those things with the bendy legs) and you'll be fine. Make sure to turn off the IS, though.

leaftye
02-21-2009, 10:11 PM
This may not relate to the F31d, but if you use close-up adapter lenses, you may find it pretty hard to get focused...at least I am. For things I know won't move, I set the focus to infinity, open the aperture all the way, then get things focuses in my viewfinder. When things look good I will back off, shoot, get a little closer, shoot, and repeat and hope this works out. I'm thinking about building a macro rail system to help make this work a little better since hand shake is still messing me up I'm trying to shoot something that's smaller than a grain of sand. A diy kit like this has some appeal: http://www.diyphotography.net/the-diy-macro-rail