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swandy
08-09-2004, 08:33 AM
I have been using PS for several years (currently using PSCS). Just purchased a Monaco Optix bundle to do my calibrations and profiling.
Created a monitor calibration using the Optix. Video Card driver shows the ICC profile as the default. When in go into Control Panel (Windows XP Pro) and click on the Adobe Gamma icon the proper ICC profile that I created shows in the box BUT it shows the white point as 5000 K (warm white) while the profile was created for 6500 K (daylight). According to Monaco's website Photoshop uses this setting (shown in Adobe Gamma). Any ideas on why the change in white point? Thanks

jaykinghorn
08-09-2004, 11:46 AM
I have been using PS for several years (currently using PSCS). Just purchased a Monaco Optix bundle to do my calibrations and profiling.
Created a monitor calibration using the Optix. Video Card driver shows the ICC profile as the default. When in go into Control Panel (Windows XP Pro) and click on the Adobe Gamma icon the proper ICC profile that I created shows in the box BUT it shows the white point as 5000 K (warm white) while the profile was created for 6500 K (daylight). According to Monaco's website Photoshop uses this setting (shown in Adobe Gamma). Any ideas on why the change in white point? Thanks

My first step would be to throw away the Adobe gamma startup utility. On Windows it has a bad habit of interfering with external calibrations. After creating a profile, visit your Color Settings tab in Photoshop. Click on the RGB working space. Near the top of the list should be a setting for Monitor RGB. Is your profile listed there? If so, Photoshop will work correctly. If not, you need to set the new profile as the default in your Control Panels. That said, be sure you cancel out of the color settings dialog box, or manually choose your RGB working space. Setting your monitor profile as your RGB working space is a bad idea.

Best of luck.

Jay Kinghorn
RGB Imaging

swandy
08-09-2004, 02:09 PM
Thanks for the reply.
Adobe Gamma Loader was previously removed from my start-up folder and the ICC profile is shown on PSCS's list where you said to look. Apparently Monaco adds it's own gamma loader to the Start Up folder. It also adds the ICC monitor profile to the color management settings for the video card driver and makes it the default color settings.
Steve

Janet
09-05-2004, 06:30 AM
I found this very interesting. If anyone knows of others like it, please post.
Janet

http://www.digitalsecrets.net/secrets/portabledarkroom.html

arghman
12-29-2004, 03:58 PM
I found these sites while looking for gamma correction:
http://www.photoscientia.co.uk/Gamma.htm
http://www.normankoren.com/makingfineprints1B.html#Whynewchart
I am starting to get lost on this stuff :( and am wondering how I get my monitor set properly... is there a standard color chart that I can buy (I don't trust the printer we have) and also download a PDF version of it so I can get the two to match on my monitor?

jaykinghorn
12-29-2004, 07:37 PM
Steve,

The quickest method of testing whether or not Photoshop is using your monitor profile correctly is to Open Photoshop, go to the Color Settings (Edit>Color Settings on PC). Click on the RGB working space tab and allow the menu to open. You may need to scroll towards the top. There will be a section labeled Monitor RGB. Whatever profile is listed next to Monitor RGB is the Profile Photoshop is using for your display. DON'T Choose monitor RGB for your RGB working space. This is just to see that it is listed correctly. The profile created by Optix XR should be listed there. Is it? If not, send another post.

There are a few targets on the market that have been printed and provide a digital file for reference, but they tend to run around $200+. Do you have a GretagMacbeth Color Checker? This is one of the most versatile pieces of equipment in a digital photographer's camera bag. If you have one, visit http://www.colorremedies.com/realworldcolor/downloads.html and click on the Macbeth Color Checker file. Use that to compare your monitor to the color checker.

Also, the website listed contains some outdated information about Montor gamma for the Macs. Most everyone seriously involved in color management currently suggests that Mac and PC users calibrate their monitors to a gamma of 2.2. This gives better cross-platform compatibility and gives a better representation of most printed pieces.

Don't give up on color management. It's not really as hard or as complex as it initially seems.

Jay Kinghorn
RGB Imaging