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24Peter
02-04-2009, 12:32 PM
Hey All - long time no post... :o

I'm getting ready to put together a product photography website, but in the meantime I've posted a gallery of some of my shots. I'm looking for feedback on which are the strongest/weakest so I can decide what to include on the actual site. Here's the link to the gallery: http://imageevent.com/24peter/productshots1

Also - I'm renting a 5D II this week and will post a mini-review sometime next week

adam75south
02-04-2009, 12:38 PM
wow peter, those look great. very professional!

what are you using for the background light in the dress shot?

Don Kondra
02-04-2009, 03:40 PM
Why don't you pick a few you have questions about and post the images here?

Too many to get into a overall critique but here's some quick thoughts...

Don't care for the color background with the lenses nor do I care for the outdoor background with the purses :)

IMHO the background should be secondary unless it is part of the design of a web page/article. Just not a color background kinda guy....

The bottles, etc. might benefit from a light tent so the light source reflections would show curves instead of the light source shape.

Having said that, I do like the reflective nature of the shoe shots..

Cheers, Don

cdifoto
02-04-2009, 03:48 PM
I can't think of any nit other than the floating bags creeping me out. You've got product shots licked, IMHO.

Don Kondra
02-04-2009, 06:45 PM
I can't think of any nit other than the floating bags creeping me out. You've got product shots licked, IMHO.

Good work to be sure but as a maker I am perhaps a little more critical than most. And/or willing to chase that extra 5% in a shot.

And I assume Peter didn't post just for a pat on the back?

This is a quick and dirty set up and shoot example of what I mean with reflections. Keep in mind I've done no work on the background and the light tent isn't always the answer. Liquid filled containers are always a challenge :)

For most non reflective pieces a paper backdrop with a top light and two side lights will produced a cleaner look.

You may even want to consider just one softbox directly over the camera, the shadows would then be behind the object and not visible. And/or side reflectors, white just to reflect light and black to reflect highlights.

Anyhow, everyone has one of these :)

44214

The top light is not being used for this shot....

44215

I haven't updated my web site in years but I have been thinking about it a lot :rolleyes:

As a furniture maker it has been most effective simply as a remote portfolio, I rarely get a commission from a specific image.

The front page should have one image to capture the viewers attention and then links to seperate category gallery's.

If you are selling images by all means link to every possible angle of each shoot.

But if you are selling your services I would suggest you consider keeping it under a dozen or so images covering a range of products/techniques.

Just enough to show you know what you're doing, most potential clients just don't have the time or inclination to view your whole body of work.

Impress them with the best and offer contact information.

Hope this helps some...

Cheers, Don

24Peter
02-04-2009, 09:52 PM
wow peter, those look great. very professional!

what are you using for the background light in the dress shot?

Hey, thanks Adam.

Do you mean this one?

http://photos.imageevent.com/24peter/productshots1/websize/IMG_8445.JPG

That's the little JTL Versalight 160 I got years ago. I usually put it on a boom as a back light or background. The thing holds its own with my AB's.

24Peter
02-04-2009, 09:53 PM
I can't think of any nit other than the floating bags creeping me out. You've got product shots licked, IMHO.

Thanks Don. I kinda like that floating look, but I know what you mean. ;)

24Peter
02-04-2009, 09:58 PM
Good work to be sure but as a maker I am perhaps a little more critical than most. And/or willing to chase that extra 5% in a shot.

And I assume Peter didn't post just for a pat on the back?

This is a quick and dirty set up and shoot example of what I mean with reflections. Keep in mind I've done no work on the background and the light tent isn't always the answer. Liquid filled containers are always a challenge :)

For most non reflective pieces a paper backdrop with a top light and two side lights will produced a cleaner look.

You may even want to consider just one softbox directly over the camera, the shadows would then be behind the object and not visible. And/or side reflectors, white just to reflect light and black to reflect highlights.

Anyhow, everyone has one of these :)

44214

The top light is not being used for this shot....

44215

I haven't updated my web site in years but I have been thinking about it a lot :rolleyes:

As a furniture maker it has been most effective simply as a remote portfolio, I rarely get a commission from a specific image.

The front page should have one image to capture the viewers attention and then links to seperate category gallery's.

If you are selling images by all means link to every possible angle of each shoot.

But if you are selling your services I would suggest you consider keeping it under a dozen or so images covering a range of products/techniques.

Just enough to show you know what you're doing, most potential clients just don't have the time or inclination to view your whole body of work.

Impress them with the best and offer contact information.

Hope this helps some...

Cheers, Don

Don - thanks for your input. I did use the lighting setups you mention (including a 48" light tent) on many shots. I'm trying to go beyond the "plain-white-light-tent" look to get some higher end advertising work.

The reason for my post was I'm planning on doing a website and wanted some reactions to the pics I've already done - looking for strong reactions either way (positive or negative) to help me choose which photos to use on the site itself.

jamison55
02-05-2009, 02:27 AM
I'm no expert on product photography, but these are the shots that catch my eye: 2, 8, 11, 38, 54, 67, 74, 92, 96, 105

BTW - that's quite a collection of women's shoes you got there, man... :D

zmikers
02-05-2009, 03:36 AM
I really like the watches, especially with the reflections. I don't like how the bags look like they were hung and then the hook was cloned out. To be honest, I can't suggest how to make it better but that's what I noticed first. And ya, what's with all of the ladies' shoes?:p

cdifoto
02-05-2009, 06:17 AM
Good work to be sure but as a maker I am perhaps a little more critical than most. And/or willing to chase that extra 5% in a shot.

And I assume Peter didn't post just for a pat on the back?
Oh yeah my bad. I have low standards and just LIVE to kiss Pete's bum. He LOVES it when I tell him his pics creep me out. :rolleyes:

michaelb
02-05-2009, 07:57 AM
Most look good to me Peter, but I'm also not fond of the floating purses.

24Peter
02-05-2009, 09:09 AM
Thanks guys.

As for all the shoes/handbags, chalk it up to sisters/girlfriends who like name brand/designer stuff. But frankly, that's the market I'm after, so it kinda works for me. ;)

adam75south
02-05-2009, 09:25 AM
chalk it up to sisters/girlfriends who like name brand/designer stuff

it's ok Peter, we accept you.

FLiPMaRC
02-05-2009, 09:34 AM
it's ok Peter, we accept you.
LOL! :D



Awesome job Peter! :cool:

Nickcanada
02-05-2009, 09:45 AM
Oh yeah my bad. I have low standards and just LIVE to kiss Pete's bum. He LOVES it when I tell him his pics creep me out. :rolleyes:

You really do need to learn how to say what's on your mind Don. Stop trying to please everyone.

Pete! great shots!! I've got nothing critical to say.

gilly
02-05-2009, 10:54 AM
Great shots peter!

I'm actually a graphic designer by day, and in general what would be asked of a photographer is to supply product shots taken on a white/neutral background. It's always a bonus if they are supplied with a clipping path ready to drop into a layout. I think it's great to show the shots with baseline reflections and on plain white backgrounds etc, but I'd avoid the busy backgrounds like with the floating handbags etc.

I know you mentioned "I'm trying to go beyond the "plain-white-light-tent" look to get some higher end advertising work." but any serious Ad agency is used to seeing and WANTS to see this style of shot. Remember it's up to the designer/art director to chose the background etc what they really want from you is the cleanest, harsh reflection free image of the product, they'll do the rest.

Hope that helps!

toriaj
02-05-2009, 04:28 PM
#2 and 15 are eyecatching, the best of the bunch IMO. 77-87 look good, although I don't care for the darkening gradient toward the top. 43-49 improve on that immensely. #9 and 14 don't look professional to me. (Although I don't know what catalogs do to make the clothes look good.) Great work, I'm always interested in your posts.

cdifoto
02-05-2009, 04:32 PM
(Although I don't know what catalogs do to make the clothes look good.)
They stick 'em on a sexy human. I do believe they're called models.

24Peter
02-05-2009, 08:11 PM
Great shots peter!

I'm actually a graphic designer by day, and in general what would be asked of a photographer is to supply product shots taken on a white/neutral background. It's always a bonus if they are supplied with a clipping path ready to drop into a layout. I think it's great to show the shots with baseline reflections and on plain white backgrounds etc, but I'd avoid the busy backgrounds like with the floating handbags etc.

I know you mentioned "I'm trying to go beyond the "plain-white-light-tent" look to get some higher end advertising work." but any serious Ad agency is used to seeing and WANTS to see this style of shot. Remember it's up to the designer/art director to chose the background etc what they really want from you is the cleanest, harsh reflection free image of the product, they'll do the rest.

Hope that helps!

Good input gilly - thank you very much! :)

24Peter
02-05-2009, 08:14 PM
#2 and 15 are eyecatching, the best of the bunch IMO. 77-87 look good, although I don't care for the darkening gradient toward the top. 43-49 improve on that immensely. #9 and 14 don't look professional to me. (Although I don't know what catalogs do to make the clothes look good.) Great work, I'm always interested in your posts.

Thanks for being specific on what works for you. Funny - #9 might be my favorite shot of all of them, but I respect your take. We all have different tastes. :)

24Peter
02-05-2009, 08:16 PM
LOL! :D

Awesome job Peter! :cool:

Thanks! and you too Adam and Nick - I feel so accepted for who I really am... :o