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meredy
01-26-2005, 01:39 AM
I bought an Olympus C-770 last week. I have been experimenting, taking a few pictures with different scenarios. I have begun to read the manual (on the computer which is a pain!!) so I've not learned much about my camera as yet. I've run into a problem already. My still shots are wonderful but I'm having a problem taking good pictures where there is movement. For instance, I took a picture of my husband and told him to move his arms. Although everything else in the picture was clear, his arms were blurred. This is my first digital camera, so I don't have a clue as to what I'm doing wrong. I did notice that in auto mode, the flash does not automatically pop up. Should it? If so, maybe this is the problem.

One more question, for any of you who have used your 10x zoom capability. Are you having any problem with image blurring when using this function. I have read a lot of reviews saying with this kind of zoom, your camera should have image stabilization, which, of course, the C-770 does not. I want to take sports shots of my grandson, and my granddaughters in gymnastics, and I want to utilize that 10x zoom to get good, crisp close up shots. Thanks for any insight you can give me. :)
Meredy

Thon
01-26-2005, 02:34 AM
I bought an Olympus C-770 last week. I have been experimenting, taking a few pictures with different scenarios. I have begun to read the manual (on the computer which is a pain!!) so I've not learned much about my camera as yet. I've run into a problem already. My still shots are wonderful but I'm having a problem taking good pictures where there is movement. For instance, I took a picture of my husband and told him to move his arms. Although everything else in the picture was clear, his arms were blurred. This is my first digital camera, so I don't have a clue as to what I'm doing wrong. I did notice that in auto mode, the flash does not automatically pop up. Should it? If so, maybe this is the problem.

The blurring is called motion blur. This happens if the shutter speed is not fast enough to freeze the motion or the arm. And since the other parts of the photo is sharp and clear, you do not have any camera shake problems (blurring caused by the movement of the camera when the shutter is open) here.

The flash on the C770UZ needs to be pop-up manually by pressing the small button at the back (with the lightning sign). It's not a problem, but by design. Another tip. If you see a flashing red lightning sign on screen it means that you might want to use the flash to get better exposure.



One more question, for any of you who have used your 10x zoom capability. Are you having any problem with image blurring when using this function. I have read a lot of reviews saying with this kind of zoom, your camera should have image stabilization, which, of course, the C-770 does not. I want to take sports shots of my grandson, and my granddaughters in gymnastics, and I want to utilize that 10x zoom to get good, crisp close up shots. Thanks for any insight you can give me. :)
Meredy

Image stabilization (IS) is a good thing to have on an ultrazoom, as camera shake normally affects higher zoom photos at slower shutter speeds. But, personally I feel that it's not a necessity, a good tripod will work too, but may find them a hassle. The good thing about IS is that you can take handheld photos at full telephoto (380mm on the C770UZ) at shutter speeds of 1/200th sec or less without too much fear of camera shake. I've managed to take good handheld full zoom photos at shutter speed as slow as 1/100th sec quite consistently, but any slower, the success rate drops significantly.

For sports shots, it helps to use manual focus to get a good focus on your grandchildren during their sports. But this involves a bit of prep before hand, as manual focus requires a bit of practice to get it right. Using burst mode helps to capture more shots for you to review later and choose the better ones, but you'll need a larger card for this. Also practice using the half-pressed shutter routine to lock focus and exposure so that you are ready when the action begins, the capture is almost immediate. The C770UZ will require a bit of time to lock focus and the action may be gone by then.

The only significant problem faced by the C770UZ is in the low light situations. It seems to work fine for sunsets and night sceneries but indoors (probably a room lit only by a couple of candles), it'll hunt around a bit to lock focus. I've so far manage to lock focus (using AF) most of the time in these situations, sometimes after a few tries, but many do complain about this matter. Manual focus helps here too.

I have a C770UZ myself too and love it for the compactness and great photos. The lack of IS means I'll need to use a tripod more but I don't really mind.

Hope this helps. :)

meredy
01-26-2005, 04:43 PM
I really appreciate your reply and the thorough tips you gave me. I'll play around with it and see what I can learn. I plan to take a class in March that is offered by the store I bought it from, so maybe that will help too.

Thanks again.

meredy
01-26-2005, 05:04 PM
Sorry, one more question. I paid alot for the Olympus C-770, more than I could easily afford, mainly because I wanted the 10x zoom and the 4 mp. I'm thinking now, go trade it for a less expensive digital while I'm still in the time period I can take it back, and just continue using my canon rebel slr for sports shots. Any suggestions as to what medium priced digital camera, with good quality pictures, would be good for me to look at? I want to be able to get good shots of flowers and bugs and people of course. Also, would like one that would take good night shots like sunsets, and fourth of July fireworks. Also, something that's not too complicated, as this is a 53 year old brain we're dealing with here and it's really true what they say, about teaching old dogs new tricks. :)

Thanks again.

Thon
01-26-2005, 08:39 PM
Sorry, one more question. I paid alot for the Olympus C-770, more than I could easily afford, mainly because I wanted the 10x zoom and the 4 mp. I'm thinking now, go trade it for a less expensive digital while I'm still in the time period I can take it back, and just continue using my canon rebel slr for sports shots. Any suggestions as to what medium priced digital camera, with good quality pictures, would be good for me to look at? I want to be able to get good shots of flowers and bugs and people of course. Also, would like one that would take good night shots like sunsets, and fourth of July fireworks. Also, something that's not too complicated, as this is a 53 year old brain we're dealing with here and it's really true what they say, about teaching old dogs new tricks. :)

Thanks again.


To be honest, I do feel that film cameras take better sports action shots that digitals. Since you have a film Rebel SLR, continue to use it for your sports shots. You can get a scanner and scan the photos into the computer at a fairly cheap cost as well.

If you feel that the C770UZ is not for you, do return it for another camera. Do give it enough time for you to familiarize with the camera 1st.

If you like a medium sized camera that takes good shots without breaking the bank, I'd say the Canon A75, A80, A85, A95 and the latest A510 would give you the best value for money. These are reasonably cheap (less than $300) easy to use cameras with manual controls available should you need it. However, they only have 3X zoom, which is rather limited compared to the 10X on the 770.

There are many other cameras that may fit your needs. You'll need to identify your budget for other readers to comment.

meredy
01-28-2005, 04:19 PM
I have definitely decided to take my camera back and get one that is easier to use for a digital beginner like me. I think the Olympus 770 is just too sophisticated for me right now. My price range would be between $300-$400. I've had trouble seeing the LCD outside as well as the optical viewfinder so I would like to get a camera that might have a sharper LCD, if there is such a thing. I felt like I was shooting blind when I was taking pix outside. It was fine inside. I would prefer the camera I get to replace this one to have both the optical view finder and the LCD, if there's one out that meets my budget and my other preferences. If not, I could probably learn to adjust to just the LCD. I would prefer an AA battery camera. 3 mp would be fine. Ease of use, sharp pictures with great color, durability, dependability... these are my most important concerns. Thanks for the info on the Canons, I'm going to check them out. I have faith in the Canon name, I had a Canon Sureshot that was wonderful and lasted for years. I wound up giving it to my daughter when I bought a new camera and she used it a long time too. I bought a Pentax, which is great and the Canon Rebel. They've both been good cameras.

Meredy

Elktender1A4
01-28-2005, 11:49 PM
Konica Minolta Dimage Z3 may be a good alternative.

a simpler camera will only give you less options, it won't make it easier. just stick to the preset shooting modes until you get the hang of it. the 770 and the z3 will also give you the ability to grow into the camera

if you are looking for Anti-Shake in an Ultra-Zoom camera, take a look at the z3. i have both the 770 and the z3 and love them both. the z3 has AS(for handheld shots), 12x optical zoom(to get up close and personal), and can shoot up to 15fps(for capturing that perfect action shot). also has a printed manual so you don't have to be sitting at your computer to learn how to use the camera. i ordered mine online for just $364 after shipping which was only ten dollars more that what i paid for my 770, but if you decide to order online, use a site that has gotten good ratings from a place like cnet or bizrate. also look at a review site like steves-digicams.com (http://www.steves-digicams.com/2004_reviews/z3.html) or cnet.com (http://reviews.cnet.com/Konica_Minolta_Dimage_Z3/4505-6501_7-30974580.html) to get a better idea if the z3 will work for what you want.