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abhinav
12-08-2008, 11:01 AM
Any tips on shooting inanimate objects at night (e.g. buildings, xmas lights)
without using a tripod (but with IS lens).
Using a SLR.
And also if the camera is moving slowly, i.e. trying to take the shot from a moving vehicle...

Here is one that came out OK after many failed attempts:
ISO: 800
Exposure: 1/4 sec
Aperture: f/5.6
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Wrl-Oc4hyMHs5NRNf0wOAA

Ray Schnoor
12-08-2008, 11:35 AM
Any tips on shooting inanimate objects at night (e.g. buildings, xmas lights)
without using a tripod (but with IS lens).
Using a SLR.
And also if the camera is moving slowly, i.e. trying to take the shot from a moving vehicle...

Here is one that came out OK after many failed attempts:
ISO: 800
Exposure: 1/4 sec
Aperture: f/5.6
http://picasaweb.google.com/lh/photo/Wrl-Oc4hyMHs5NRNf0wOAA
Yes, bring the car to a complete stop.

toriaj
12-08-2008, 04:59 PM
I can understand not wanting to use a tripod (hassle of carrying it around, setting it up in a crowded area, impatient friends/family) but it really is worth it. If you can't take your tripod, go another time.

But I know that's not what you're looking for. You can try using something else to steady the camera, such as holding it on top of a fence or car. Be sure you use the self-timer function or remote to avoid moving the camera when you push the shutter button. Since your subjects are holding still, keep to a low ISO (200 or lower) and a medium aperture (say 5.6-11.) along with a long shutter speed. If your camera support + IS aren't steady enough for a long shutter speed, shorten the shutter speed and open the aperture to around 3.5 - 4. If that's not enough, raise your ISO, just know that your pics will be more grainy.

TheWengler
12-08-2008, 05:06 PM
If you don't use a tripod then you'll have to make other compromises in your images (noise, camera shake, depth of field).

JLV
12-09-2008, 03:27 AM
I have posted this on this forum a number of times.

I use a 1/4 x 20 bolt inserted in the tripod socket on the camera. To that I have attached a one foot wire. (I am using fishing leader wire. I think twisted picture hanging wire would also work). To the loop I made at the outer end of the
wire, I attach a shock cord. I step on the end of the cord and pull up. The pressure helps steady the hand.
Attached Images

Paul79UF
12-09-2008, 05:09 PM
I usually just crank up the ISO to the max and take several shots to make sure that I get one good one.

Obviously you can lower the ISO if you have something to lean on for stability.

tim11
12-10-2008, 05:22 PM
Solution?

Easy...


Yes, bring the car to a complete stop.

...and place the camera on a sturdy surface.

I'd get out of the car set up the tripod or I wouldn't with such shots at all.

abhinav
12-10-2008, 10:11 PM
Whats the min shutter speed you think can be used without using a tripod... Next time when I visit that place.. I am trying ISO 1600. I guess I should be able to use 1/8 sec at that! Noise yeah.. but sometimes something is better than nothing :)

TheWengler
12-11-2008, 12:33 AM
The formula for hand holding w/o IS is: SS=1/35mm equiv. focal length

To figure out the equivalent focal length you multiply the actual focal length by your cameras crop factor (1.6 for Canon). Then you factor in your image stabilization. I believe the kit lens is good for 4 stops. So multiply the SS you get w/o IS by 16 (which is 2 to the 4th power). That should tell you what SS will allow you to handhold the camera without camera shake.

abhinav
12-11-2008, 03:19 PM
That gives me approx 1/2 sec at the wide end (18mm)! Thanks for pointing it out, the shake is less prone at wide-end so that's another tip!

Ray Schnoor
12-15-2008, 05:24 AM
That gives me approx 1/2 sec at the wide end (18mm)! Thanks for pointing it out, the shake is less prone at wide-end so that's another tip!
That assumes that you are actually trying to keep the camera/lens from moving/shaking. If the camera/lens is in a moving car, this doesn't necessarily hold true.

Ray.

Turn
12-15-2008, 06:01 AM
my rule of thumb is that anything below 1/50 (1/40 or 30 is only when I have no other choice) is too low for hand held