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kmack55
09-17-2008, 04:16 PM
i have a canon rebel xti and am new to digital slr -- havng trouble getting good action shots of indoor basketball games --what am i doing wrong?

i tried the sports setting and the "P" mode with speed up to 1600 but parts of shots are always burry -- i might get a decent shot of a player on the move but the ball is blurred --i should get better shots with this camera i would think --

HELP !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

KMACK

SpecialK
09-17-2008, 04:41 PM
Welcome to probably the most expensive photo subject - indoor sports.

When you have low light, you have 4 options:
1. Use a slower shutter speed to let in more light. This creates blur, so skip that.
2. Larger aperture to let in more light. Lenses that come with your camera (kit lens) or budget zooms often only open up to perhaps f4 or f5.6 depending on the focal length. Bummers.
3. Use a higher ISO setting. At higher values you will start to see little grainy clumps - called "noise". Not so good.
4. Add light. This is usually with a flash or other lighting, but at sports events you are normally out of luck for that.

What to do...

One option is to get a lens that has a larger maximum aperture (smaller number). Something in the 70-200 focal length zoom with a maximum aperture of f2.8 will cost at least $750 or more new. A prime" lens (does not zoom) will be in that ball park as well. Note that size and weight go up quite a bit as well, due to the bigger pieces of glass.

The other option is getting an expensive camera body that has low noise levels at higher ISO.

sun5150
09-27-2008, 01:26 AM
Indoor sports are hard.
The dim lighted gyms are the worse. You have to boost your ISO setting to 1600/3200 and you get a bunch of noise/grain in the pictures. The auto focus might give you trouble because of not enough light.

You need a fast lens to get some good pictures.


I shot basketball for a junior college team last year and they have a new gym. The lighting was great.



If you have a Nikon D3 you won't have that problem....which I don't.:D

seanhoxx
09-28-2008, 06:40 PM
Best option, spend big money!! For most of us just like the other two said, pretty good camera, higher ISO, a "good" fast lens 70-200 2.8 fast shutter, good support, position for best light you can. Learn to pan with the action "I can't do it worth a darn" and shoot lots, better chance of good ones
P.S. remember to have fun!

Joe Fisher
09-28-2008, 08:21 PM
Probably the first and most important thing to do is, for gawds sake, stop shooting in sport mode. IIRC it sets the ISO on some low number like 400.
I do a lot of indoor athletic shooting, specifically dog agility. I had an XTi, but sold it and got a 40D so I could use the higher ISO.
What I do, and in your case probably should do is
-Put the camera in AV or manual mode NOTE: some will say to put it in TV (shutter priority mode), but I prefer AV because I don't have to experiment to get the fastest shutter speed.
-Set the ISO to 1600
-shoot with as wide an aperture as you have.

SpecialK gave you some good options.
I know for me, one of the best investments I've made is my Canon 70-200 f 2.8 IS L lens. It's kinda spendy, but it *does* get the shots.:-)
Second best investment is a good Manfrotto tripod, I also have a monfrotto monopod but tend to use the tripod more.

Shooting at a high ISO gives you noise in the pictures, but I'd rather have noise than a big ol blur.:-)

Shooting with a wide aperture (f 2.8 or wider) has a really shallow depth of field, meaning the dog's nose might be in focus, but his shoulders wont be. But again, I'd rather have a slightly out of focus shot than no shot at all.

seanhoxx said it all..practice, practice, practice...in time you'll learn where to focus. It's taken me months and I've still got a long ways to go.

My website;
http://dogshots.biz



i have a canon rebel xti and am new to digital slr -- havng trouble getting good action shots of indoor basketball games --what am i doing wrong?

i tried the sports setting and the "P" mode with speed up to 1600 but parts of shots are always burry -- i might get a decent shot of a player on the move but the ball is blurred --i should get better shots with this camera i would think --

HELP !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

KMACK

seanhoxx
09-28-2008, 09:08 PM
Some nice shots Joe, I have always enjoyed watching agility trials if and when its on t.v. now and then on animal planet. Do you shoot at any field trials with the bird dogs and retrivers?

Joe Fisher
10-02-2008, 01:19 PM
Thanks! No, I've only done agility trials, never even seen anything other.


Some nice shots Joe, I have always enjoyed watching agility trials if and when its on t.v. now and then on animal planet. Do you shoot at any field trials with the bird dogs and retrivers?

peterf
10-17-2008, 12:44 PM
One big problem in High School Gyms is that the lights will cycle, sometimes as often as every 60 seconds. It makes it very hard to get any consistency in your results.
I use a Sigma 28-200 f2.8 lens, ISO 1600-3200, minimum of 1/320 depending on sport. I also find best results is to shoot at 200mm standing at one end and shooting at the other
end. Being down on the floor instead of up in the bleachers also seems to work better.
See www.kodakgallery.com/petersphotos for examples

seanhoxx
10-17-2008, 08:05 PM
Peterf, if you haven't seen it go down to the Sony dslr forums and read Don Schap's posting called High ISO, lets loose the noise, some intersting tweaks and custom settings for getting the ISO way up with out the noise, well as much of it anyway with the alpha cameras

stanj
10-19-2008, 01:53 PM
I attended a Sacramento Kings preseason game last week, just after I got my first DSLR and took some shots, mostly in preprogrammed Sport mode . They all turned out fine considering I did not know what to expect from the camera, a D90, and being a clueless newbie. My seat was way up on the top tier, so I watched much of the game through the viewfinder. Here is a typical shot with the kit lens from quite far away from the action. I am posting a reduced version and resampled to a lower resolution to fit the file size restrictions. The original was in JPG, not RAW, at a middle detail setting. The data recorded the shot was f/5.6 1600 ISO 1/1000sec 105mm
So the question of whether a modern DSLR can capture and stop action in moderate light without too much noise is answered by: "Yes, but depends"

One thing was interesting, I tried the continuous shooting mode on some free-throws and found that from letting the ball leave the finger tips, 5 frames could be taken before hitting the basket. I can't imagine needing anything faster than that for my activities.