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TDN169
07-07-2008, 04:35 PM
I've just ordered a Cokin A series filter mount for my camera, so, what are the best and most useful filters to get?

Bynx
07-07-2008, 07:41 PM
Its like saying you just got a new wife and want to know the best position. Everyone will give you their opinion but the only one that matters is yours. Whatever you feel comfortable with. What you will be shooting is a big factor. Outdoors or indoors. Portraits or landscapes. Each filter has its element. I suggest you read up and decide what suits you best.

toriaj
07-07-2008, 10:01 PM
I use a Hitech 1.2 hard line graduated neutral density filter (http://www.2filter.com/prices/htpackages.html) (Cokin P-series size) for darkening skies so they don't blow out. It is excellent, I'd recommend it to anyone, but since you have the A series, one of these (http://www.cokin.fr/filtres2.html) would probably work well for you. I'd recommend one of the neutral (gray) ones, the darkest one, if you're going to use it for landscapes as I do. A circular polarizer is also handy for getting dramatic skies, and a neutral density filter is helpful for waterfall shots, or any time you want to use a longer shutter speed and/or larger aperture when it's too bright outside.

DonSchap
07-07-2008, 10:34 PM
Remember that the A-series limits its use to lenses with a 62mm-filter ring or less. I would suggest that you would be better off considering the P-series, in the future ... and getting converter rings for your smaller filters.

Two of the best and most useful, in my opinion, are the 4x and 8x star. I recently got this fireworks shot with one of them:

37718

The SPEED filter is also quite creative and useful:

37719

Here is the multi-image filter ... with a twist:

37720

It isn't all just shading light ... you can bend and shape it, too.

Using Photoshop filters to augment your work ... can be pretty cool, too.

37722

Yes, this is the fireworks image ...

TDN169
07-09-2008, 01:26 AM
Hmm... Looks like some interesting ones to try out- as Brynx so graphically explained, there are so many to choose from! I've just ordered an ND2 Grad and a +3 closeup to start with. I've already got a 6x and Cross Screen star filter so I think I'll wait untill I'm comfortable with the system before getting any filters I've already got.

Apparently graduated orange (or the pigment in an 85B filter) brings out blue skies. Any ideas?

DonSchap
07-09-2008, 01:53 AM
You have considerably more control using software, when it comes to color changes. The old film filters are duplicated in it, under higher levels of control. You can be entirely more selective about what gets the filter and what does not.

I have not shot through the film filters since I went to digital, after Photoshop CS3.

Good luck!

Rhys
07-09-2008, 06:20 AM
I have a shed load of Cokin A stuff. In the end I stopped using it all. Back in my film days I went back to circular filters and chose my lenses carefully so that they all had 52mm filter rings. My circular filters were: ND, rd, green, yellow, orange, starburst and polariser. I needed no other filters.

Now I am digital I need less - just the polariser although I do still like to put a Hoya SMC UV filter onto each lens. I notice my Canon lenses have a wider variety of filter threads ranging from 58mm to 77mm. Thus I have to carry several polarisers.

Beowulff
07-09-2008, 08:45 AM
Its like saying you just got a new wife and want to know the best position.

This takes my award for the quote of the day..... maybe of the year even LOL.

:D

DonSchap
07-09-2008, 08:52 AM
Well, admittedly ... just who would you ask? LOL :D :p :rolleyes:

TDN169
07-10-2008, 05:10 AM
You have considerably more control using software, when it comes to color changes. The old film filters are duplicated in it, under higher levels of control. You can be entirely more selective about what gets the filter and what does not.

I have not shot through the film filters since I went to digital, after Photoshop CS3.

Good luck!

Yeah, I usually use software but things like skies are always lost because digital cameras are less sensitive to white light- you can recover a black area of an image, but if the sky is white, you've lost it for good.

I always use a polariser now to get a bit more sky in.

At a competitive level, there are often rules like "photographs cannot be edited, except for adjustments to levels" and if you forget to cheat and change the EXIF, you're stuffed.