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Tim Dougherty
01-13-2005, 11:56 PM
I use the rebel digital and it is a wonderful camera. I use the sigma 28-300 6.3 lens and I truly believe that if you have a sunny day you can't take a bad picture with this lens, however for dim light it is really tough. I bought the lens because I do a lot of volunteer work for organizations that include sports shots mostly, but now I am getting more involved with inside shooting. I have so much trouble with shaking of the camera and just plain lousy shots when I am inside shooting. When I say inside I mean shooting at a concert or a play without light as an example. I have been told although I don't really understand it and I think by now I should that I can change the white balance on my camer and also change the ISO so that dim light will not be a major problem. Will someone please explain this to me. It would really help me. :confused:

timmciglobal
01-14-2005, 02:33 AM
The ISO setting (you have to be in mode P, S, TV or M) changes what would be the "film speed". Basically ISO 100 = less light sensative = need more light. ISO 1600 = most light sensative = need less light. So why not just shoot at ISO 1600? Image noise. The higher the ISO the more "noise" or blue small lines you'll have across the entire image in the case of Rebel.

Your can set your camera ISO higher (go into P mode, then press UP 4 way controller, then rotate the spin dial on top till you see 100,200,400,800 or 1600 show on the LCD. That will be your new "iso" the one you stop at. Now your other choice is to buy a better lens. For indoor or "near" shots your best bet is 50 MM F1.8. That lens lets in ALOT more light hence you can use ISO 100 (the best image quality/low noise) but you won't be able to zoom. You'll be set at about 78 MM. Your other choice is buy a better lens, and the lower F number = more money. The F 1.8 fixed lens can be had only for 70$ (a huge deal, but it isn't a zoom so its cheaper) the zoom lenses go up in price ALOT and run on average 500>2500$.

Tim

eagle17
01-14-2005, 12:22 PM
also when you get below f2.8 you will start to have Depth of Field (DOF) issues. This will result in not all of your subject in focus at the same time...and can be great for artistic shots but lousy for many shots.

D70FAN
01-14-2005, 03:31 PM
I use the rebel digital and it is a wonderful camera. I use the sigma 28-300 6.3 lens and I truly believe that if you have a sunny day you can't take a bad picture with this lens, however for dim light it is really tough. I bought the lens because I do a lot of volunteer work for organizations that include sports shots mostly, but now I am getting more involved with inside shooting. I have so much trouble with shaking of the camera and just plain lousy shots when I am inside shooting. When I say inside I mean shooting at a concert or a play without light as an example. I have been told although I don't really understand it and I think by now I should that I can change the white balance on my camer and also change the ISO so that dim light will not be a major problem. Will someone please explain this to me. It would really help me. :confused:

Changing white balance has little effect on helping camera shake.

Along with the suggestions already made by other contributors you should look into one of the Canon IS (Image Stabilized) lenses.

The EF 28-135mm f3.5-5.6 IS is about $400 (a bargain for an Image Stabilized lens) and will allow you to shoot at 2-3 stops lower than normal as it compensates for camera shake.

There is also the EF 75-300mm f/4.0-5.6 IS USM if you need a really long telephoto (but for indoor shooting the 28-135 should suffice)

IS lenses combined with the ISO set at 800-1600 should allow you to shoot indoors, without a flash, with a much higher degree of success.

To reduce the amount of noise (grain) when shooting at high ISO you can also use post-processing software, like Noise Ninja, to clean-up the image.

rbuesching
05-18-2006, 08:13 AM
Hi Tim, I got the Rebel XT (EOS-350D in Germany) and some weeks ago I took some photos in the Cologne Cathedral. Was also afraid of "shaking". So I set ISO to 800 (i am afraid of 1600 because of the noise) and used some Underexposure (-1 EV). The results were great. Try yourself!

The pic attached shows a rhino that was underexposed about 3 stops (-3EV). Because it was the only rhino I "shot", I kept the pic. It's not so bad???