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cmaw63
05-02-2008, 11:33 PM
I would like to buy a lens for my Fuji S700, I believe it has 46 mm threads. I'm confused as to what type of lens I want/need. I do almost all outdoor shots of nature, wildlife, etc... So, I want it mainly for protection of the camera lens and to filter bright sunlight. Do I want a UV or Polarizer...or are they one and the same? And I know not all brands are created equal so if you could throw out a few names I would appreciate it.

Thanks in advance.

Signed...

I will learn all of this...eventually

JLV
05-03-2008, 06:38 AM
A UV filter is good for protecting your lens. A Polarizer is used to reduce glare and reflections. Although it can also be used to enhance reflections. A Polarizer will reduce the amount of light getting to your lens, thus you would need to use a larger F stop, slower shutter, and/or higher ISO.

cmaw63
05-03-2008, 08:50 AM
So...as someone fairly new to using manual modes I will be better off going with a UV filter. Thank you for answering what must seem like a silly question to most people. It seemed the more I tried to learn about the filters...the more I got them confused with each other.

Bynx
05-03-2008, 09:23 AM
For a simple lens protector the easiest filter to use is a 1A Skylight. Just screw it on and leave it on all the time. It doesnt affect the amount of light entering the lens. Check out the Fuji 700 thread. I have posted comparisons with wide and and telephoto screw on lenses with a $60 package by a NYC photo company who deals on ebay. The lenses are definately not an improvement but you be the judge for yourself.

pas49ras
05-03-2008, 10:06 AM
The UV filter or a 1A skylight as Bynx suggested is the filter commonly used for lens protection. There are a few good dealers on E-bay that sell Hoya filters. There are many types..I use the Hoya Super HMC Pro1..it is thinner than the regular filters..

This is a good one on e-bay http://stores.ebay.com/Spotlight-Photo

cmaw63
05-03-2008, 12:20 PM
Thanks Bynx and pas49ras. I now have a 1A Skylight filter on the way.

Next question...I saw a red filter. Why would that be used? I'm not really interested in one, but have never seen one before. And are there other filters/lens that should be added as standard equipment?

Thanks again!

Bynx
05-03-2008, 12:38 PM
For the S700 as standard equipment I use all the filters from my old 35mm. I use my close-up filters #1, #2 and #3 quite a bit when doing macro shooting. As you know when doing super macro with the S700 the flash is disabled. So by using the close up filters you can get as close or closer and still have the flash work. A polarizing filter is always nice to have for those really deep blue skies. Also skin is browner as the sweat sheen is removed also the reflection on water is cut down quite a bit. Anything else would be really specialty filters like the red one. I think its for black and white shots and makes the sky very dark and the clouds very white. But Ive never used it so dont hold me accountable. If you decide to get a polarizing filter make sure it is a circular and NOT linear filter. Other filters like Fluorescent are not necessary because you have that built in feature with the camera with the white balance. One last thing which is handy is a step up ring. To go from 46mm to 52mm. Many filters are available in 52mm size so once you have the step up ring you can fit more choices to the camera.

Prospero
05-03-2008, 04:14 PM
Colour filters have more or less become obsolete these days. It is very easy to duplicate the effect of these filters with photoshop.

Bynx is right about the red filter, it was indeed often used for black and white to enhance the sky. Now, you can just enhance colour channels to get this effect.

By the way, many point and shoots can autofocus with a linear polarizer. You may want to try this before deciding what polarizer to get, as linear polarizers have a more pronounced effect and are cheaper.
If you are shooting landscapes you could also consider getting a graduated ND filter. This helps you to get the sky and the foreground both exposed properly. If you shoot waterfalls, you may get a ND filter, so that you can stretch the shutterspeed and get nice smooth water in the shot.

cmaw63
05-03-2008, 11:54 PM
Okay...
I need a macro lens...if I had to chose one which one should I get? I'm not sure of the differences in a #1, #2, or #3. I'll be looking at adding a Polarizer too as I will be doing an 8 day road trip to Yellowstone & the Badlands and want good (hopefully sunny) shots.

Prospero, I love waterfalls and hope to get pictures of some while on my trip. I don't think I've heard/read of a ND filter. Care to elaborate?

Again...thanks to all of you for your patience with my questions. I promise I will quit asking so many soon.

TheWengler
05-04-2008, 11:46 AM
http://www.dpfwiw.com/filters.htm

Bynx
05-04-2008, 12:53 PM
Excellent site Wengler. Good refresher course for me as well as a bit of added info on digital aspects of using the filters. Thanks.

cmaw63
05-07-2008, 10:52 PM
Next lens question....
I plan on buying a Hoya Neutral Density Lens. But, I'm not sure if I want the 2, 4, 6, or 8. Which number is the best all around lens for a beginner?

Thanks in advance.

cmaw63
05-07-2008, 10:57 PM
Thank you for the link Wengler. It is an informative site...just some of it is beyond my understanding at this point in my photography experience (or lack of).

TheWengler
05-07-2008, 11:21 PM
Next lens question....
I plan on buying a Hoya Neutral Density Lens. But, I'm not sure if I want the 2, 4, 6, or 8. Which number is the best all around lens for a beginner?

Thanks in advance.

Probably a 3 stop ND filter would be good for general use. It really depends what you plan on shooting and in what light. Could you say what you need to filter for, just to make sure you're getting the correct thing.

Bynx
05-08-2008, 05:35 AM
If you get a small number ND filter you may as well just get a more versatile Polarizing filter which is good for a couple of fstops. If you need to use a ND filter then go for a higher number like 6. Ive had a ND filter for many years. Only problem is I never think to use it. To me its just been a waste of money. I hope your memory is better than mine.

cmaw63
05-08-2008, 06:41 AM
Probably a 3 stop ND filter would be good for general use. It really depends what you plan on shooting and in what light. Could you say what you need to filter for, just to make sure you're getting the correct thing.
I tend to gravitate towards water on my vacations...waterfalls, streams, rivers, lakes, oceans.

Other types of photography I like to do are landscapes (a lot of mountains), wildlife, and flower & insect macros.

My upcoming vacation is a 3000 mile trip and will (hopefully) include all of the above (except an ocean)...but it will be done at a leisurely pace so I can set up the camera and tripod, for the best possible shot, whenever & where ever something catches my eye. So, I really want to be prepared for each situation...I'm just sorry I'm bugging the heck out of all of you to get a better understanding of what I will need to take great photos.

Thanks yet again

TheWengler
05-08-2008, 12:49 PM
So the ND filter will help you with the water shots you mention. A polarizer will help you with general landscapes. It makes clouds pop out of the sky more and reduces glare (off water, leaves, etc.). If I were getting just one filter it'd be a polarizer. You can also stack them. So if you put a polarizer and a 3 stop ND filter on your camera you'd get 4-5 stops.

pas49ras
05-08-2008, 02:32 PM
I tend to gravitate towards water on my vacations...waterfalls, streams, rivers, lakes, oceans.

Other types of photography I like to do are landscapes (a lot of mountains), wildlife, and flower & insect macros.

My upcoming vacation is a 3000 mile trip and will (hopefully) include all of the above (except an ocean)...but it will be done at a leisurely pace so I can set up the camera and tripod, for the best possible shot, whenever & where ever something catches my eye. So, I really want to be prepared for each situation...I'm just sorry I'm bugging the heck out of all of you to get a better understanding of what I will need to take great photos.

Thanks yet again
I agree with Wengler about getting a polarizer as your first filter since they are also going to cause you to loose a stop or two. Also..you may want to be sure you have a tripod so you can keep the ISO low and and get clear pictures with the slower shutter speeds.

cmaw63
05-08-2008, 06:41 PM
Thank you both for your answers. A Polarizer & Neutral Density filter will be joining my camera soon.

pas49ras...I do happen to have a great tripod. :)