PDA

View Full Version : New Nikon 24-120 VR IF-ED Zoom lens & D70 ???



PCBoats
08-06-2004, 10:52 AM
I just learned that Nikon had recently released their new AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED lens. Although I have not had the opportunity to read all the specifications, I am wondering if it will work well with the new D70 camera. My thought is consider buying the D70 body only and adding this lens. I plan to use the camera as a backup when I shoot special events, corporate functions and various action activities.

My thought is that if I just purchase the D70 body for $999 and the lens for around $500 I would have a great combination. Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated.

Thank You.

Peter

D70FAN
08-06-2004, 04:50 PM
I just learned that Nikon had recently released their new AF-S VR Zoom-Nikkor 24-120mm f/3.5-5.6G IF-ED lens. Although I have not had the opportunity to read all the specifications, I am wondering if it will work well with the new D70 camera. My thought is consider buying the D70 body only and adding this lens. I plan to use the camera as a backup when I shoot special events, corporate functions and various action activities.

My thought is that if I just purchase the D70 body for $999 and the lens for around $500 I would have a great combination. Any thoughts on this would be greatly appreciated.

Thank You.

Peter

Possibly a good choice, but for general purpose shooting you will miss having real wide-angle as an option. On the other hand I have the 18-70 DX kit lens, and run into limitations on the long end of the scale.

I have tried the Tamaron 28-300 and really missed the extra wide-angle that 18mm affords on a D70 (or any cropped sensor digital).

Next week I will be trying a Sigma 18-125mm f3.5-5.6 DC lens, and I'm hoping that even with it's low cost ($269) that it will turn out to be a good daily use zoom.

I will post the results.

PCBoats
08-06-2004, 06:48 PM
George,

Thanks for your input.

Seems that, considering the costs of the kit and the lenses, it might be best to first obtain the D70 kit. I still like the 24-120 zoom lens. It only costs about $525. I think it is a great value for this lens. But for now the 18-70 lens will do. As one person suggested, I might consider getting a second camera body and attach eht 28-120 lens to that. Hmmmm. Something to look into in a couple of months. Right now I just want to get my hands on the D70 and I'm all but convinced it should be the kit. Also, I'm considering the SB800 flash as my choice of strobe.

Peter

D70FAN
08-07-2004, 10:35 PM
George,

Thanks for your input.

Seems that, considering the costs of the kit and the lenses, it might be best to first obtain the D70 kit. I still like the 24-120 zoom lens. It only costs about $525. I think it is a great value for this lens. But for now the 18-70 lens will do. As one person suggested, I might consider getting a second camera body and attach eht 28-120 lens to that. Hmmmm. Something to look into in a couple of months. Right now I just want to get my hands on the D70 and I'm all but convinced it should be the kit. Also, I'm considering the SB800 flash as my choice of strobe.

Peter

The SB800 is definately the perfect match for the D70. I have used the SB800 a couple of times, but have not yet sprung for the $329 tab. The on-board flash seems to do what I need for now and is very effective out to about 21 feet.

I think you meant 24-120 Nikkor VR. The Nikkor lens means starting at 36mm, which you will probably find unacceptable (I did). My only other current lens is a 50mm AF f1.8 that I picked up used for $59. Definately add one of these to your kit, or better yet the 50mm AF f1.4. A very nice, fast focus, tack-sharp portrait and landscape lens. With the nifty 1.5x multiplier you end up with a 75mm f1.8 (or 1.4). Quite a bargain.

Hang in there, for a few days, and I will let you know how the Sigma 18-125 works out.

PCBoats
08-08-2004, 01:30 PM
George,

After receiving several comments, I thought that the 24-120VR Nikkor lens would serve as a good second lens for shooting some boating and fishing action shots. Then I was chatting with another photographer who had the 24-120VR lens. He told me he does not use it any more because it produces images which are too soft. Darn it, is there no easy resolve? Things can get quite complex sometimes.

Peter

D70FAN
08-08-2004, 05:56 PM
George,

After receiving several comments, I thought that the 24-120VR Nikkor lens would serve as a good second lens for shooting some boating and fishing action shots. Then I was chatting with another photographer who had the 24-120VR lens. He told me he does not use it any more because it produces images which are too soft. Darn it, is there no easy resolve? Things can get quite complex sometimes.

Peter

Like I said, I'll test the Sigma 18-125 this week and let you know. Should work as the primary day-to-day lens if it is as good as the Nikkor 18-70 (kit lens).

John_in_NC
02-01-2005, 08:03 PM
I set up my camera on a tripod using the SB800 Flash in iTTL mode, no diffuser or bounce.

All shots were very close to 50mm Focal Length at an aperature of F5 at 1/60 and used
Autofocus focusing on the "AF" on the 50mm box using a 5 second timer as to eliminate any shake.

DSC_2244.JPG and DSC_2244.NEF are from the 24-120 VR lens with VR off
DSC_2245.JPG and DSC_2245.NEF are from the 50mm 1.8 lens
DSC_2247.JPG and DSC_2247.NEF are from the kit 18-70mm lens

All were taken with the camera set to sharp.

There is no 2246 file as I forgot to set the focal length to 50mm.

Below is the link to my server, the files are not crops but the full images in both RAW as well as JPG so you can play with them in PS if you like.

My Opinion is that the 24-120VR is the least clearest of of the bunch. HOWEVER, the test was weighted towards the 50mm lens. In reality for daily outdoor recreational shooting I rarely use my tripod so the VR is a nice option. I wish I saved the photo I took doing a 1 second exposure with the VR hand holding the camera but supporting with my elbows on a table. There was absolutely no blur at all with the VR on.

http://album.inspireimages.com/lenstest/

D70FAN
02-01-2005, 09:23 PM
I set up my camera on a tripod using the SB800 Flash in iTTL mode, no diffuser or bounce.

All shots were very close to 50mm Focal Length at an aperature of F5 at 1/60 and used
Autofocus focusing on the "AF" on the 50mm box using a 5 second timer as to eliminate any shake.

DSC_2244.JPG and DSC_2244.NEF are from the 24-120 VR lens with VR off
DSC_2245.JPG and DSC_2245.NEF are from the 50mm 1.8 lens
DSC_2247.JPG and DSC_2247.NEF are from the kit 18-70mm lens

All were taken with the camera set to sharp.

There is no 2246 file as I forgot to set the focal length to 50mm.

Below is the link to my server, the files are not crops but the full images in both RAW as well as JPG so you can play with them in PS if you like.

My Opinion is that the 24-120VR is the least clearest of of the bunch. HOWEVER, the test was weighted towards the 50mm lens. In reality for daily outdoor recreational shooting I rarely use my tripod so the VR is a nice option. I wish I saved the photo I took doing a 1 second exposure with the VR hand holding the camera but supporting with my elbows on a table. There was absolutely no blur at all with the VR on.

http://album.inspireimages.com/lenstest/

John, The last entry on this thread was in August. I did keep the Sigma 18-125 as it turned out to be the equal of the Nikkor 18-70, but with better range.

I tried the 24-120 VR and found that it was a little better, but range limited. VR is a nice feature, but not worth double the cost.

Ray Schnoor
03-03-2005, 09:00 AM
I just thought I'd point out to anyone else reading this that a 50mm/1.4 lens with a 1.5x teleconverter attached will give you (at best) an effective 75mm/2 lens. Adding a 1.5x teleconverter typically loses you a stop, and adding a 2x usually gives you a 2 stop drop in maximum aperture.

George is not using a teleconverter, but adding the 1.5x multiplier to the lens which you have to do with most dSLR cameras.

Since the imager of most dSLR cameras is smaller than a 35mm frame of film, you have to multiply the focal length of the attached lens by 1.5(Nikon) or 1.6(Canon) to get the actual focal length of the lens attached to said camera.

Ray.

D70FAN
03-03-2005, 01:44 PM
George is not using a teleconverter, but adding the 1.5x multiplier to the lens which you have to do with most dSLR cameras.

Since the imager of most dSLR cameras is smaller than a 35mm frame of film, you have to multiply the focal length of the attached lens by 1.5(Nikon) or 1.6(Canon) to get the actual focal length of the lens attached to said camera.

Ray.

Thanks Ray.