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Jredtugboat
01-10-2005, 09:28 PM
Hi all,

I'm a new dcresource member. I am considering buying a dSLR and had a question about cleaning the CCD/CMOS sensor.

Olympus advertises that its SSW will effectively ban dust from the sensor. How do you keep the image sensor clean if you buy a Nikon or Canon? It seems to me that the sensor is some sort of electrostatically charged device, so blowing/wiping would be neither effective nor advisable.

So far I've narrowed down the list to either a D70 or an EOS-20D, but the dust issue is beginning to bother me. (Although I live in NYC, I don't have the money to "take the camera to a professional" every time some monstrous piece of Brooklyn particulate clamps onto the sensor.)

Does anyone have any experience with this?

I look forward to your responses.

Yours,

Julian

TheObiJuan
01-11-2005, 12:14 AM
some dslrs may require you to go into the menu and enable a cleaning mode which will remove the mirror so you can access the sensos.
turn the camera upside down so the dust falls out and use a dust blower or a swiss blower to gently get the dust off the sensor.

D70FAN
01-11-2005, 11:46 AM
Hi all,

I'm a new dcresource member. I am considering buying a dSLR and had a question about cleaning the CCD/CMOS sensor.

Olympus advertises that its SSW will effectively ban dust from the sensor. How do you keep the image sensor clean if you buy a Nikon or Canon? It seems to me that the sensor is some sort of electrostatically charged device, so blowing/wiping would be neither effective nor advisable.

So far I've narrowed down the list to either a D70 or an EOS-20D, but the dust issue is beginning to bother me. (Although I live in NYC, I don't have the money to "take the camera to a professional" every time some monstrous piece of Brooklyn particulate clamps onto the sensor.)

Does anyone have any experience with this?

I look forward to your responses.

Yours,

Julian

Consider this:

Thousands of professional photographers use dSLR's every day. From battlefronts to exploring, portraits to events, and you never see a speck of dust interfering (even when it's there sometimes).

I have seen dust on my D70 exactly once in 8 months. Set the mirror to lock-up with the lens opening pointing down, and gently blew into the lens opening, did a sky check, dust speck gone, and have not had this problem since.

If you take just minimum care when changing lenses you can avoid most contamination. pre uncover the replacement lens mount. Point the lens down. Remove the mounted lens. Quickly, but carefully, mount the new lens. immediately cover the removed lens and put it in a protective carier.

I carry a (very) small camel-hair makeup brush for dusting the lens, and use it for cleaning around the lens mount before changing lenses as well. You want to keep your lenses clean and keep them in a carrier of some type rather than exposed. That way they are always ready for use.

Incidentally, I had to really look hard to see the dust spec in the first place, as it's so out of focus that it blends in to everything except blue sky (hence the sky test).

Anyway, fretting over dust on the sensor is counter-productive. Just check once in a while and clean as required. It's called maintenance. Required on film SLR's occasionally as well.

Worse case you can remove dust particles in Photoshop.

Jredtugboat
01-11-2005, 05:12 PM
Consider this:

Thousands of professional photographers use dSLR's every day. From battlefronts to exploring, portraits to events, and you never see a speck of dust interfering (even when it's there sometimes).

I have seen dust on my D70 exactly once in 8 months. Set the mirror to lock-up with the lens opening pointing down, and gently blew into the lens opening, did a sky check, dust speck gone, and have not had this problem since.

If you take just minimum care when changing lenses you can avoid most contamination. pre uncover the replacement lens mount. Point the lens down. Remove the mounted lens. Quickly, but carefully, mount the new lens. immediately cover the removed lens and put it in a protective carier.

I carry a (very) small camel-hair makeup brush for dusting the lens, and use it for cleaning around the lens mount before changing lenses as well. You want to keep your lenses clean and keep them in a carrier of some type rather than exposed. That way they are always ready for use.

Incidentally, I had to really look hard to see the dust spec in the first place, as it's so out of focus that it blends in to everything except blue sky (hence the sky test).

Anyway, fretting over dust on the sensor is counter-productive. Just check once in a while and clean as required. It's called maintenance. Required on film SLR's occasionally as well.

Worse case you can remove dust particles in Photoshop.

George,

Thank you for your thoughtful reply. I was sort of hoping that I was making a mountain out of a molehill and it appears that I was.

Incidentally, where did you get a camel hair brush? Is this the sort of thing you get at a cosmetic supply store, or a specialty shop?

Thanks again.

Yours,

Julian

p.s.: You mention pre-cleaning the camera prior to switching lenses. I wonder if an anti-static cloth (like a Swiffer?) would also help.

D70FAN
01-11-2005, 06:45 PM
George,

Thank you for your thoughtful reply. I was sort of hoping that I was making a mountain out of a molehill and it appears that I was.

Incidentally, where did you get a camel hair brush? Is this the sort of thing you get at a cosmetic supply store, or a specialty shop?

Thanks again.

Yours,

Julian

p.s.: You mention pre-cleaning the camera prior to switching lenses. I wonder if an anti-static cloth (like a Swiffer?) would also help.

I bought the current brush at Micheals, (Princeton 1/2 inch 6550) but any soft brush will work. The cosmetic brushes will work as well. I have been wanting to try one of the destat sprays on the brush but haven't so far.

The anti-static cloth is also a good idea as long as it isn't wet.

eagle17
01-11-2005, 07:57 PM
In most of the camera stores you can also get what is called a rocket blower . there are two sizes the big one is the best and I have never had a problem with dust that I could not fix in photoshop. There are some really good sites that you can find info on this I will try to find some of my favorite ones and post them in this thread...

Rhys
01-12-2005, 05:44 AM
I tend to use a handkerchief and my breath for cleaning most optical things. It works well enough.

Jredtugboat
01-12-2005, 02:14 PM
I tend to use a handkerchief and my breath for cleaning most optical things. It works well enough.

I have a friend who works in film (2nd unit camera mostly) and works with some pretty expensive lens elements. (Like, probably worth more than my life.) He notes that on set the "Irish mist" method is strictly verboten as it contains some volatiles that are thought to be capable of damaging lens coatings.

As far as the cleaning fibre? He uses some super duper microfibre cloth but has admitted to using the old, well-worn lint-free t-shirt cloth trick.

Just some thoughts there.

Julian

scalia
01-16-2005, 03:31 AM
hi...
this link is on Ken Rockwell site regarding cleaning a dslr sensor

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/cleaning.htm

interesting read...

BigConig
01-27-2005, 11:47 AM
Pec pads and eclipse is the way to do it. COpperhill is wher I got my stuff from. Dust is a non issue now.

link (http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/image/39082096)

jeisner
01-27-2005, 02:33 PM
hi...
this link is on Ken Rockwell site regarding cleaning a dslr sensor

http://www.kenrockwell.com/tech/cleaning.htm

interesting read...

I have NO respect for this guy to be honest, based on a lot of differenet stupid things he says, this is from the link you provided.

"To clean a lens or filter I prefer to breathe on it to coat the lens with a thin fog of pure distilled water."

Hey I don't know about him but I don't breathe out distilled water.....

scalia
01-30-2005, 09:05 PM
I have NO respect for this guy to be honest, based on a lot of differenet stupid things he says, this is from the link you provided.

"To clean a lens or filter I prefer to breathe on it to coat the lens with a thin fog of pure distilled water."

Hey I don't know about him but I don't breathe out distilled water.....

oh okay then if you not believe Ken :D
maybe you believe Mr Reichmann better, here's the link
http://luminous-landscape.com/essays/sensor-cleaning.shtml

and oh, don't try to ask a question on the oly forum about how to clean the sensors, they don't know how to do it ;)

radek_42
01-31-2005, 02:04 PM
oh okay then if you not believe Ken :D
maybe you believe Mr Reichmann better, here's the link
http://luminous-landscape.com/essays/sensor-cleaning.shtml

and oh, don't try to ask a question on the oly forum about how to clean the sensors, they don't know how to do it ;)

I like that page. There seems to be a lot of useful information. However, I could not find anything (on that page) about cleaning lenses. You can find a lot info on web, but ... they all say different things and I don't like to take chances.

Some say use cotton, some say no way cotton etc. I have access to pretty any solvents at work, so I was thinking to use isopropyl alcohol (IPA). I think this is safe for the lens (sure about glass and it should not harm the coating either). I am not sure what to use to wipe it off. Q-tip sounds attractive, but it's cotton (it might be a problem) and usually it leaves fibers behind.

How much pressure can you apply while wiping the lens? Can you press as much as you do while cleaning your glasses (after all, they are coated as well)? I am trying to clean the back of my new quantaray lens (it had some dirt when I got it ... it first looked a scratch, but IPA got if off). That darm back lens is small and curvy. I found it difficult to clean it well.

Thanks for info.

Cheers, R

ps. btw, I found some info about your breath ... it supposed to be mostly destiled water + some living creatures :) Good Liserine wash is recomended before breathing on your glassware :)

idssms
02-13-2005, 01:59 PM
I have had to clean my CCD twice now and use the compressor I got for the bike tires. I use a funnel head on the end of the hose and it takes all the dust off the CCD. You have to place the camera on manual to get the lense to open and stay open.

Check out my latest pics:

http://community.webshots.com/user/irwind101

Don

gary_hendricks
02-17-2005, 07:36 AM
Hi all,

I'm a new dcresource member. I am considering buying a dSLR and had a question about cleaning the CCD/CMOS sensor.

Olympus advertises that its SSW will effectively ban dust from the sensor. How do you keep the image sensor clean if you buy a Nikon or Canon? It seems to me that the sensor is some sort of electrostatically charged device, so blowing/wiping would be neither effective nor advisable.

So far I've narrowed down the list to either a D70 or an EOS-20D, but the dust issue is beginning to bother me. (Although I live in NYC, I don't have the money to "take the camera to a professional" every time some monstrous piece of Brooklyn particulate clamps onto the sensor.)

Does anyone have any experience with this?

I look forward to your responses.

Yours,

Julian


Most of the issues are with lens cleaning. Ensure you take care when cleaning the lenses and dust will be ok.

Paul Smith
03-06-2005, 06:53 AM
Just joined today and noticed your question, in which by now I am sure you may have bought your new Digitla camera. I am a profesional and use the Nikon D1x, I have on serveral occassion's cleaned the CCD. The first and most important thing is to ensure the cameras power is off, I use a special kit which powers the mirrror only, but not the camera's CCD. If you expose the CCD to strong light while powered up you may damage the chip. Do check with your camera dealer how your particular camera's power is switch off whilst cleaning the CCD.

Have Fun and good luck

Paul

Nick
03-06-2005, 09:35 AM
Might I ask what I can do to clean the mirror? There's dust on it too!

Norm in Fujino
03-06-2005, 10:13 AM
One thing for sure: all this discussion reminds me of one reason I'm considering the Oly e-volt!

D70FAN
03-06-2005, 10:27 AM
Might I ask what I can do to clean the mirror? There's dust on it too!

Once in a while you need to get the camera cleaned (this is true for film cameras as well).

Here in the Phoenix area Tempe Camera Repair will clean the camera and sensor for $35. I'm sure there are other camera stores that have this service as well.

I'm not sure what Nikon charges for this service but by the time you figure shipping costs and time it may not be worth it.

That said I would think that you could carefully brush the dust off the mirror with a soft brush (maybe spray the brush with a destat solution and let it dry first). Since the mirror does not affect the image, I'm not sure that it is that critical.

Just some ideas.

jeisner
03-07-2005, 02:48 PM
One thing for sure: all this discussion reminds me of one reason I'm considering the Oly e-volt!

It shouldn't be a major factor, I have cleaned my CCD twice so far (1100 photos in) the first time was actually as soon as I got it (camera came with free dust) the second was just two days ago, and I change lenses very frequently!!!

It isn't such a big deal IMHO....

Just order the stuff from copperhill (http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning), this method works fine for me and MANY others....

D70FAN
03-07-2005, 03:07 PM
It shouldn't be a major factor, I have cleaned my CCD twice so far (1100 photos in) the first time was actually as soon as I got it (camera came with free dust) the second was just two days ago, and I change lenses very frequently!!!

It isn't such a big deal IMHO....

Just order the stuff from copperhill (http://www.pbase.com/copperhill/ccd_cleaning), this method works fine for me and MANY others....

You got free dust? I am truely jealous (uh, maybe not). You should have asked the seller for a free cleaning kit to go with that. But maybe that was the idea. Give away free dust and then make you pay for the cleaning kit.

I guess it worked. ;)

sherlock
03-07-2005, 04:20 PM
I have NO respect for this guy to be honest, based on a lot of differenet stupid things he says, this is from the link you provided.

"To clean a lens or filter I prefer to breathe on it to coat the lens with a thin fog of pure distilled water."

Hey I don't know about him but I don't breathe out distilled water.....

Hey,

I happen to love Ken's site, and I'm sure many other's here do as well. IMHO the reason some people do not like it is because Ken gives his OPINION on many things, and some people just don't agree with him. I find his sight very educational and motivating. And to the quote above, maybe it was a typo! We all have our moments :confused: .......


Andrew S.