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View Full Version : Photo/Camera Class vs. Book



somimom
03-18-2008, 02:24 PM
Newbie here. I was wondering how most newbies learn the ins and outs of everything. Did you learn via a class and book or just one or the other? I'm having a tough time finding a class in my area. I've heard about online classes but are those good? Recommendations? Book recommendations? If there is one out there that is a MUST have, please tell me. I've been reading all these forums and reviews on various books on Amazon but can't decide. I live in the Northern Colorado area--Fort Collins if you know of any classes this way. Maybe a lot of it is just experience and trial and error by just getting out a working with your camera?

bauerman
03-18-2008, 02:26 PM
Understanding Exposure - Petersen

Great book on taking manual control of your photography.

I also liked "The Digital Photography Book" by Scott Kelby.

somimom
03-18-2008, 02:32 PM
Thanks so much Jared. The Petersen book was top on my list. Good to know I'm on the right track! :)

tim11
03-18-2008, 03:25 PM
All I learned I learned from one basic photography book, tips from camera forums and photo magazines; most can be borrowed free from local libraries. Shoot, experiment, study the effects and exif data.

Bynx
03-18-2008, 04:22 PM
Since digital cameras have a view screen you can get instant results for your settings. Your eyes are the best teacher. If the picture doesnt look right do it again until it does. You dont need a book. Its not like you are guessing what the pic will look like and you have to wait a week to get the pics back. Shoot, shoot, shoot and dont waste money on an art class.

tim11
03-18-2008, 05:14 PM
Since digital cameras have a view screen you can get instant results for your settings. Your eyes are the best teacher. If the picture doesnt look right do it again until it does. You dont need a book. Its not like you are guessing what the pic will look like and you have to wait a week to get the pics back. Shoot, shoot, shoot and dont waste money on an art class.

I agree on most points except 'you don't need a book'.

You don't need a book but only if you have sources like the internet to grasp basic principle such as exposure, aperture, shutter speed, DoF, ISO; etc. Without understanding such basics you will only look blindly at the screen wondering how to create different effects.

Irreverend reverend
03-18-2008, 06:59 PM
Hi Somimom!

Love your town and surprised the college doesn't offer something compatible for your needs. The advantage of a class, from my p/o/v is being w/others of somewhat similar skill and gaining the additional advantage of hearing their questions and the answers from the instructors; sort of accelerates the learning curve. You also meet some real nice folks!! This "old dog" just signed-up to be taught a "few new tricks."
However you do it, I look forward to your "captures" from such a scenic area.

PJ

Bynx
03-19-2008, 11:55 AM
Tim11 is right. A book is recommended and I ammend my previous post. That book being the manual that came with your camera. I have read mine many times and continue to use it. Knowing your camera is prime. The manual explains very well all the basics of photography while explaining the controls of your camera. Anything after that is for specialities. In the mean time just do a lot of shooting and understand what you are doing.

griptape
03-19-2008, 01:38 PM
Just play with this: http://dryreading.com/camera/index.html until you get a basic understanding of what things do when you change them. Each setting changes how much or how little light gets into the camera. It's not hard to grasp. There really isn't anything more to it. Especially considering modern cameras have metering that tell you when they think your settings are right, if you apply yourself a little, learning how your settings affect your picture doesn't take a book or class to understand.