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Rhys
02-24-2008, 05:45 PM
I was looking idly online and found you can get CF-IDE and CF-SATA connectors. In theory you can then use a CF card as a hard drive instead of an ordinary hard drive. That sounds very interesting. I investigated and found several people report success using their CF cards as hard drives.

Looking again at the Asus EEPC, this makes it look more interesting although the screen is still too small to be very useful. It does make the Asus look more interesting though.

n20capri
02-24-2008, 06:48 PM
Definitely not a theory...it's called a solid state hard drive. My friend is a computer/network guy and just re-did the server that runs the local newspapers' printing press...he used a Lexar 2 gig 133 speed CF card!! Pretty awesome stuff. Def the wave of the future.

FLiPMaRC
02-25-2008, 07:48 AM
DIY SSD Guide (http://www.notebookreview.com/default.asp?newsID=4255)

http://www.notebookreview.com/assets/30926.jpg



Setup

One nice perk of these types of devices is they don't require any drivers to work on any system. There are a few requirements though; the system must have SATA, and the compact flash card must support DMA modes. Some older flash cards will have problems, but since 4GB to 16GB flash cards didn't economically exist a few years ago, this should not be a problem.

Power Consumption

With the DIY SSD, I was expecting at least a little less power draw, but nothing was found in my use. Idle power draw was around 15.3w for both the 7200rpm drive, and the DIY SSD. Chances are the $30 adapter has nowhere near the power efficiency levels that a true SSD would have.

Conclusion

With this review I was planning on showing a proof of concept that it was possible to make your own SSD and didn't expect that it would provide such great real world results. While many very pricey performance SSDs exist, the module I assembled had greater speeds than the SSD found in an off the shelf notebook at a fraction of the price. If you are on a budget and need an option for a notebook that sees very rough duty, or you just like snappy boot times you may want to check this out.

Pros

* MUCH cheaper compared to any other SSD solution
* You pick the flash module you trust most
* Very small overall size compared to 2.5" drives

Cons

* Not as fast as a 7200rpm drive or a performance SSD
* No gain in battery life



Now a price comparison between a true SSD and a DIY SSD:
An 8GB SSD SATA is about $255 ... Newegg.com - SUPER TALENT FSD8GC25M 2.5" 8GB SATA Internal Solid state disk (SSD) - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820609241)



An 8GB 133X CF is about $40 ... Newegg.com - Transcend 8GB Compact Flash (CF) Flash Card Model TS8GCF133 - Retail (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820208340)

The adapter (http://www.addonics.com/products/flash_memory_reader/adsahdcf.asp) is about $32 ... shopaddonics - - CF - SATA hard disk adapter (http://www.shopaddonics.com/itemdesc.asp?ic=ADSAHDCF&eq=&Tp=)


Interesting that Addonics have brackets for a number of applications. So you can add an SSD to your desktop for cheap :cool:

http://www.addonics.com/products/flash_memory_reader/images/adsahdcf_tree.jpg




Now, the problem I foresee is a CF card read/write cycles are nowhere close to a typical hard drive or a true SSD. The only thing this would be worth doing for is noise and durability purposes. I'm wondering how long the cards will last if they're used like a hard drive.

kombizz
02-25-2008, 02:56 PM
Ive looked at the EEPC and am interested in it.They say they will also offer an 11 inch version as well as the 7 inch.Its very good value but tests have shown the linux OS to be not as smooth as XP

Rhys
02-25-2008, 05:36 PM
Ive looked at the EEPC and am interested in it.They say they will also offer an 11 inch version as well as the 7 inch.Its very good value but tests have shown the linux OS to be not as smooth as XP

The SSHD on the Asus is the main selling point of the Asus in my opinion. It's a crying shame that the Asus only has a SD socket built in rather than a CF slot. SD is not available in sizes as large as CF.

FLiPMaRC
02-26-2008, 12:44 PM
Everex came out with it's own "Cloudbook" ... http://www.engadget.com/tag/cloudbook

http://www.blogsmithmedia.com/www.engadget.com/media/2008/01/cloudbook_pr.jpg $399 at Walmart (http://www.walmart.com/catalog/product.do?product_id=8245470) :D

Key Features & Benefits:
# 7" widescreen color LCD
Presents vivid 800 x 480 WVGA resolution
# 1.2 GHz VIA Technologies C-7M ULV processor
High performance design uses PowerSaver technology for extended battery life
# 512 MB of DDR2 system memory, 533 MHz
Offers good performance and can be expanded to 1 GB
# 30 GB hard drive
Provides storage for documents, games, music, photos and video clips
# 802.11b/g wireless LAN
Connects to wireless home and office networks or to Wi-Fi hotspots for convenient Internet access
# 4-in-1 media card reader
Reads the most popular memory card formats for simple photo and data transfer
# gOS Rocket operating system
Makes computing easy in conjunction with the supplied software applications

Rhys
02-26-2008, 02:26 PM
That looks very tasty. I'd love to see that with a SSHD though.

FLiPMaRC
02-27-2008, 01:24 PM
That looks very tasty. I'd love to see that with a SSHD though.

:( The problem right now with SSHD is cost. That's why the 2GB Eee PC is $300 and $350 for the 4GB.

Everex used a regular HD to offer consumers a 30GB HD and keep the price down. But soon we will be seeing smaller non-SSHD in consumer products like these:
http://www.engadget.com/2007/12/10/tomatos-3-inch-thick-60gb-hard-drive/
http://www.engadget.com/2008/02/26/toshiba-intros-80gb-120gb-1-8-inch-hard-drives/

Rhys
02-27-2008, 01:46 PM
:( The problem right now with SSHD is cost. That's why the 2GB Eee PC is $300 and $350 for the 4GB.


Agreed. I anticipate it will be 2 years before we see a 64GB SSHD going for $9.99 over the counter at Staples.

Really and truly, the way CF cards are plummeting in price, it might make more economical sense to RAID several high-capacity CF cards and to use them mirrored in place of a single more expensive SSHD.

I can't see rotating hard drives lasting in production for very many more years. Look at how the 3.5" disk and before that the 5" disk and before that the 8" disk all vanished. Look also at how many people actually use memory sticks of less than 1GB these days!

IMHO, SSHDs offer lower production costs because they're so much simpler - chips soldered to a board and chips are produced by the million. Less soldering than in a standard HDD, less materials, less testing needed. I reckon it won't be too long before SSHDs are a ton cheaper than HDDs.

FLiPMaRC
02-28-2008, 09:41 AM
Very true Rhys. Two years ago, I paid $70 for a 512mb USB drive ... LOL!!! Today you can get 8gb for $30 or less.

Rhys
02-28-2008, 10:28 AM
Very true Rhys. Two years ago, I paid $70 for a 512mb USB drive ... LOL!!! Today you can get 8gb for $30 or less.

I remember paying $115 for a 1GB card in 2005 and thinking I'd had an absolute bargain. Now I can get 1GB for $7.50 from Newegg.

njoy_az
02-28-2008, 02:16 PM
I paid DEM 180 for a 128MB CF card a couple of years ago. I could get a 8GB Extreme IV for that amount right now ...

As for USB drives: My 1GB High Speed (8/16 MB/s) Transcend cost me about €18 three weeks ago, its (rather slow and thus replaced) predecessor was about €40.

Rhys
02-28-2008, 02:52 PM
About 2 years ago, I bought a Hyperdrive HD80 as a portable backup device. I am not sold on hard drives as a portable storage solution. It's a 40GB device.

Having seen that I can now get 32GB CF cards, I think it's better to invest in larger cards than to waste money on portable storage solutions using flimsy hard drives.

Here's a challenge for all you hard drive storage backup people... Let's take my CF card to the top floor of the Sears Tower and your hard drive storage solution as well. Then we'll throw them both off the top and pick them up from the car park below. I'm willing to bet that my CF card would work when I plug it into my laptop or camera. How about the backup hard drive?

For those that prefer smaller cards, you can always put a large CF card in the Hyperdrive and use that as a SSHDD.

zmikers
02-28-2008, 03:08 PM
Here's a challenge for all you hard drive storage backup people... Let's take my CF card to the top floor of the Sears Tower and your hard drive storage solution as well. Then we'll throw them both off the top and pick them up from the car park below. I'm willing to bet that my CF card would work when I plug it into my laptop or camera. How about the backup hard drive?

Who cares about the results.....That just sounds like fun:p

njoy_az
02-28-2008, 03:14 PM
I agree with you Rhys, that SSDs are coming fast. Just look at the direction the iPods are taking, all but the largest ones (Ipod classic) are now solid state ones (with up to 32GB). Even the iPhone is up to 16GB now. And the MacBook Air is the first one sporting a ssd as option. :)

Rhys
02-28-2008, 04:37 PM
I agree with you Rhys, that SSDs are coming fast. Just look at the direction the iPods are taking, all but the largest ones (Ipod classic) are now solid state ones (with up to 32GB). Even the iPhone is up to 16GB now. And the MacBook Air is the first one sporting a ssd as option. :)

As soon as a 64GB or even a 32GB SSHD comes out at a reasonable price I shall be getting one for my laptop. If my Compaq battery is still working then it will go straight into my Compaq otherwise, it'll go straight into my Macbook (when the Compaq battery dies I'm getting a Macbook).

FLiPMaRC
03-04-2008, 06:33 AM
Hey Rhys ... 9" Eee PC :D http://www.engadget.com/2008/03/03/hands-on-with-the-9-inch-eee-pc/

Pic Gallery: http://www.engadget.com/photos/hands-on-with-the-new-9-inch-eee-pc/673193/

7" vs 9": http://www.engadget.com/2008/03/03/7-inch-eee-pc-vs-9-inch-eee-pc-ready-fight/

Rhys
03-04-2008, 09:01 AM
Neat. I wish Apple had brought out a 12" Macbook rather than the 13". Oh well, c'est la vie. I suppose that even if I bought a Macbook tomorrow I could always put a SSHD in it in 12 months time.

FLiPMaRC
03-05-2008, 06:13 AM
Neat. I wish Apple had brought out a 12" Macbook rather than the 13". Oh well, c'est la vie. I suppose that even if I bought a Macbook tomorrow I could always put a SSHD in it in 12 months time.

News about a 256GB SSD in 2009: http://www.engadget.com/2008/03/04/samsung-intros-spinpoint-mp2-reiterates-plans-for-256gb-ssd-in/

Rhys
03-05-2008, 07:19 AM
Hmm... I'm tempted by SSHDs but I want them to come down in price first. I'm also tempted by the macbook air.

FLiPMaRC
03-05-2008, 07:39 AM
Hmm... I'm tempted by SSHDs but I want them to come down in price first. I'm also tempted by the macbook air.

Eh? I think your money will be better spent on an IBM Thinkpad/Lenovo X300.

http://www.engadget.com/2008/02/15/lenovo-x300-vs-apple-macbook-air/

Review: http://www.notebookreview.com/default.asp?newsID=4270


The Macbook Air fails imo because:
One USB port, no optical drive
No ethernet port..
biggest hard drive you can get is 80GB
AND for you travelers, the battery cannot be removed

Rhys
03-05-2008, 03:13 PM
I want the Apple because it uses OSX and not Windows. I'm moving out of Windows and into OSX. I have tried Linux but quite honestly am not at all keen on it - even with Enlightenment as the desktop.

FLiPMaRC
03-06-2008, 08:01 AM
Oh okay. Gotcha ;)

I on the other hand, haven't used a MAC since college.

FLiPMaRC
04-03-2008, 07:30 AM
I did a very minor upgrade :) Ordered the parts last Friday, and it came in Tuesday.

http://www.pbase.com/marcjosef/image/95033441/large.jpg
Newegg.com - SAPPHIRE Radeon HD 2600XT 512MB 128-bit GDDR3 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814102703) ... got it for $85 (I had an ATi Radeon X1300Pro 256mb before)
Newegg.com - G.SKILL 2GB (2 x 1GB) 240-Pin DDR2 SDRAM DDR2 800 (PC2 6400) (http://www.newegg.com/product/product.aspx?item=N82E16820231098) ... got it for $35 (I had 2GB [2x1GB] DDR2-533 PC2-4400 before)

BEFORE THE INSTALL
http://www.pbase.com/marcjosef/image/95033438/original.jpg


Took 5 minutes to install.
http://www.pbase.com/marcjosef/image/95033442/large.jpg

AFTER THE INSTALL
http://www.pbase.com/marcjosef/image/95033440/original.jpg

My CPU (Core2Duo E6400 2.13Ghz) is now the bottleneck ... LOL. I think it's time for a Core2Quad Q6600 upgrade :D But before then, my next purchase is adding a 2nd internal HD (500GB or more).

erichlund
04-03-2008, 08:47 AM
Wow. That is one strange looking motherboard. It all looks backwards.

I see it's a Dell. They obviously don't buy stock motherboards, because I've never seen a configuration like that. Is that supposed to be the CPU under the aluminum heat exchanger?

FLiPMaRC
04-03-2008, 09:00 AM
Wow. That is one strange looking motherboard. It all looks backwards.

I see it's a Dell. They obviously don't buy stock motherboards, because I've never seen a configuration like that. Is that supposed to be the CPU under the aluminum heat exchanger?The motherboard is BTX form factor: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BTX_(form_factor)

No, that's not the CPU: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:BTXformFactor.JPG

erichlund
04-03-2008, 12:21 PM
BTX, eh. That's a new one on me. Thanks.

Visual Reality
04-03-2008, 01:58 PM
I want the Apple because it uses OSX and not Windows. I'm moving out of Windows and into OSX. I have tried Linux but quite honestly am not at all keen on it - even with Enlightenment as the desktop.
Then run OSX on it.

http://www.windowsdevcenter.com/pub/a/windows/2005/01/18/PearPC.html

That info is 2 years old - there has probably been further development by now.

More:
http://www.osx86project.org/

Seriously, due to the reasons stated above (no ethernet, one usb, no optical) do not buy the Macbook Air. That is exactly what Jobbs wants you to do. Imagine how much their margins must be by cutting all of that out of the notebook and only ending up with 3lbs of produced material to sell, yet the markup is extreme.

FLiPMaRC
04-04-2008, 08:42 AM
Then run OSX on it.

http://www.windowsdevcenter.com/pub/a/windows/2005/01/18/PearPC.html

That info is 2 years old - there has probably been further development by now.

More:
http://www.osx86project.org/

Seriously, due to the reasons stated above (no ethernet, one usb, no optical) do not buy the Macbook Air. That is exactly what Jobbs wants you to do. Imagine how much their margins must be by cutting all of that out of the notebook and only ending up with 3lbs of produced material to sell, yet the markup is extreme.
LOL ... Rhys already bought an Apple ;) http://www.dcresource.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?s=&daysprune=&f=3

Rhys
04-04-2008, 11:17 AM
LOL ... Rhys already bought an Apple ;) http://www.dcresource.com/forums/forumdisplay.php?s=&daysprune=&f=3

And I'm very happy with my Macbook. I'm so happy I might just get an iMac desktop too.

I had a look at the two links. Somehow, running a Mac emulator under Windows doesn't quite cut it - it's as bad as running Windows over MSDOS. It's vulerable to the normal Windows vulnerabilities due to the fact it runs under Windows.

The second link, I couldn't really work out what it was all about. The big thing though - by the time you've spent all the time messing about trying to fudge a Windows system so that it'll run OSX you might as well have saved yourself all the aggro and just bought a Mac in the 1st place!

T06
04-05-2008, 11:34 PM
Rhys, how savvy are you at putting things together? If you have a moderate amount of confidence then may I suggest THIS http://lifehacker.com/software/hack-attack/build-a-hackintosh-mac-for-under-800-321913.php The limit is your imagination here, oh yeah, please keep this quiet as the microsoft kiddies no doubt will start to cry.:D:D:D

Rhys
04-06-2008, 10:16 AM
Rhys, how savvy are you at putting things together? If you have a moderate amount of confidence then may I suggest THIS http://lifehacker.com/software/hack-attack/build-a-hackintosh-mac-for-under-800-321913.php The limit is your imagination here, oh yeah, please keep this quiet as the microsoft kiddies no doubt will start to cry.:D:D:D

That sounds very interesting. I have a desktop that I use which might work with hacked OSX. It's a Dell Dimension 4300S with 256mb at the moment. I'm going to have to try the new memory I purchased for it (512mb) from ebay some day.

erichlund
04-06-2008, 10:42 AM
Rhys, how savvy are you at putting things together? If you have a moderate amount of confidence then may I suggest THIS http://lifehacker.com/software/hack-attack/build-a-hackintosh-mac-for-under-800-321913.php The limit is your imagination here, oh yeah, please keep this quiet as the microsoft kiddies no doubt will start to cry.:D:D:D

Interesting. However, do I understand correctly that you have to have a MAC to build the patched DVD? Or, can you do this on a PC? Because, if you already have a MAC, then it begs the question, "What's the point???".

gmtech79
04-06-2008, 10:58 AM
No you can make/burn the patched dvd on a windows machine but in order to install it you need a processor that can read SSE3 instructions. I tried it a few times with different patched dvd's on my dell 4550 and it was a no go since my dell only supports MMX,SSE and SSE2. But that has been a while ago there may be a patched DVD thats supports SSE2 by now. I do know people that have working hackintosh's.

Rhys
04-06-2008, 11:37 AM
It seems like an awful lot of fiddle to go to when for a very little more money you can just buy a real iMac.

T06
04-08-2008, 03:42 AM
It seems like an awful lot of fiddle to go to when for a very little more money you can just buy a real iMac.

I have an iMac. What the referral to is basically a macpro or even spec it better. When viewed in that light it saves you thousands.