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View Full Version : Vertical folding flash for Nikon Camera.



THANG0359
02-08-2008, 01:30 PM
I currently have an sb600 flash and alot of my vertical shots with the flash has a bad shadow in the background. I was wonder whether there is a flash that i can fold to the vertical position so i can bounce the light off the ceiling as if i was taking a horizontal shot... I don't really want to carry around a bracket.. any suggestions??.. I've seen the paparazzi using them but i don't know who makes them or what they're called... thanks..

Rooz
02-08-2008, 01:59 PM
i just twist the head of the sb around so its pointing vertically as i take the shot. flash brackets are really cumbersome and quite frankly a pain in the ass. unless your doing a pro gig, not sure if theres a place for them.

gary fong's lightsphere/ whaletail is supposed to make vertical flash shooting much easier. i have never used one so i cant comment. here's a link to one of his videos.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VGb1eO9awFk

THANG0359
02-08-2008, 02:15 PM
Rooz, i've tried every angle possible with my camera in the vertical position but i still can't produce the type of shots i can when the camera is in the horizontal position (almost no shadows).. thanks for the input...

Rooz
02-08-2008, 02:20 PM
not sure what shadows you are talking about. if the flash head is facing up then its effectively bunced off the ceiling anyway, (albeit alot less efficient). mayeb post an example for us ?

otherwise, slow down your shutter speed, bump up the iso and let in more ambient light.

erichlund
02-08-2008, 03:27 PM
Rooz, i've tried every angle possible with my camera in the vertical position but i still can't produce the type of shots i can when the camera is in the horizontal position (almost no shadows).. thanks for the input...

First, are you aware that the head of the flash rotates in more than one axis?

If you hold the flash body upright, the head of the flash can be rotated to point either forward (slightly down) to straight up. It can also be rotated around its horizontal axis to point left or right, and even back, when rotated to the left. Of course, if you tilt the camera to the left for a portrait orientation shot (grip on top), you can rotate the head up to 90 degrees to the right, which would then have it pointing straight at the ceiling.

If you are bouncing the flash in this manner and still getting harsh shadows, then you should consider a diffuser, or, as Rooz said, use less flash and more ambient light.

TNB
02-08-2008, 03:28 PM
Rooz, i've tried every angle possible with my camera in the vertical position but i still can't produce the type of shots i can when the camera is in the horizontal position (almost no shadows).. thanks for the input...

In order to help avoid the shadows, check into a flash bracket. There are a wide variety of models and types. I own two: One heavy model (straboframe) better suited for studio and another lighter and smoother model at a higher cost (custombrackets.com). However, there are some very basic and rather inexpensive models.

K1W1
02-08-2008, 11:28 PM
Tether the flash to the camera with the wire thingy that Nikon make and get somebody to hold the flash in the correct angle for you. If you shoot on a tripod you could hold the flash yourself with your left hand.

LucyC
02-09-2008, 11:02 AM
Tether the flash to the camera with the wire thingy that Nikon make and get somebody to hold the flash in the correct angle for you. If you shoot on a tripod you could hold the flash yourself with your left hand.

TTL Sync Cord SC-28, plus, your kit is light enough to be held one handed.

tcadwall
02-09-2008, 01:47 PM
Erich:
First, are you aware that the head of the flash rotates in more than one axis?


I am with you Erich, I am really confused, I haven't had trouble with the SB-600 in portrait mode. Granted, it is a bit narrower on that axis, but I can't say I have noticed the difference in the shots.

Without trying to sound condescending, Thang, I am going to try to describe the actual adjustment.

1) You do know to push the rubberized adjustment button on the flash joint to allow movement....

2) Hold your camera in the normal landscape mode with the flash mounted, angle it at 90 deg. (facing subject head on). That step shouldn't require the release button

3) Now push the adjustment Button on the right side of the flash and spin it to the right. If you look down on the lower part of the flash unit as it spins you will see 30 - 60 - 90. I normally start at 60 so that it bounces and fills a little. Now, when you rotate your camera (counter-clockwise) to take the shot it should now be setup correctly.

If this is what you have tried and it hasnt worked satisfactorily, then maybe you do need to diffuse the flash, or bounce it with a card...

THANG0359
02-11-2008, 01:56 PM
Hey Guys i really appreciate your help.. I had a diffuser on there the whole time and never took it off since i bought the sb600..... and i was doin some test shots last night (without the diffuser) camera vertical and flash turned toward the ceiling. The results were no shadow on the white wall with my subject was right in front... there seem to be a harsh shadow if i had the diffuser on..i guess it was the diffuser that gave me the unwanted result i was stating above...

thanks guys..
La

tcadwall
02-11-2008, 02:57 PM
LOL... lighting can be a pain... glad you figured it out, sorry I got so elementary about it, just couldn't see how it would be giving you so much trouble. your diffuser must have been taking off too much light, so that the bounce wasn't filling in the back wall while at the same time "diffusing" the flash ONTO the subject.