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Big Daddy
01-31-2008, 05:32 PM
I've been reading up on the different modes on my camera and I am confused as to which one I need to photograph a indoor horse show? Camera is a NIKON D50, so you probaly know what the dial modes I have are. P=Programmed Auto seems to me to be the best choice for this application. I can manually change the ISO to compensate for the lighting. P setting from what I read is for when there is little time to make camera adjustments with moving objects which is exactly what I will be photographing. Am I wrong here? Should I use A, or S instead? What do ya'll think? :confused:

toriaj
01-31-2008, 06:05 PM
The arena is probably rather dimly lit, with moving people and animals. I'd suggest you go to Manual. Set your ISO to 800. Put your aperture at the widest (smallest #) you have. Put your shutter speed to 1/250. Take some shots and see how they look on the LCD and histogram. If they look too bright (bunched up on the right side of the histogram,) be happy and lower your ISO to 400 or 200. If they still look too dark, mutter under your breath and raise your ISO to 1600.

It would help to know what lens you are using. If it's the 18-55mm kit lens, you can lower your shutter speed all the way to 1/90 without getting camera shake (but you will get some motion blur in the subjects.) If, on the other hand, you're using a 200mm zoom lens, you need to keep your shutter speed high unless you're using a tripod.

P.S. Learn about white balance. You can try it on Auto, but it might look way too yellow on the LCD. If so, try the other modes. Or, better yet, learn how to custom-set your white balance.

I hope that was helpful, and not too much information. Try out the settings ahead of time so you know what it will be like. Good luck!

Big Daddy
01-31-2008, 07:35 PM
Thanks toriaj for the feedback, I will probably be using the 70-300mm lense 1:4-5.6 G because I will want some close up shots. Not familiar with white balance but I'll read up on that. This is all confusing to me,:( I guess that's why they put the auto modes on the camera for people like me. Thanks again.:)

toriaj
01-31-2008, 08:08 PM
I have a 70-300mm zoom lens too, and although I like having the range, at the 300mm end the aperture can't open all the way (the widest aperture at 300mm is 5.6) and you often get camera shake if the shutter speed is longer than 1/400 or 1/500 sec. So it's not a great lens for low light. There's no substitute for the range, though! So if you can use a tripod, definitely do it. If you can't use a tripod, use your knee, the chair ahead of you, your son's head, whatever :)

I hope you post again or PM (private message) me a day or two before the show if you are still confused.

TheWengler
01-31-2008, 09:18 PM
Thanks toriaj for the feedback, I will probably be using the 70-300mm lense 1:4-5.6 G because I will want some close up shots. Not familiar with white balance but I'll read up on that. This is all confusing to me,:( I guess that's why they put the auto modes on the camera for people like me. Thanks again.:)

Is that the lens with VR? A 70-300mm lens might be nice for close ups but it's not really meant for indoor shots. Are you shooting RAW or jpeg?

pas49ras
02-01-2008, 04:27 AM
I like to shoot in AV (or A) mode so you can max out the aperture and just concentrate on your shutter speed. With the aperture at its max (lowest number possible)set the ISO to 800..take a picture and check the shutter speed. You can raise the ISO higher or lower based on the shutter speed you are getting, less than 1/100 sec. try and go with a higher ISO. I've found using a mono pod to be a great help if you are shooting from your seat.

Big Daddy
02-01-2008, 06:20 AM
Is that the lens with VR? A 70-300mm lens might be nice for close ups but it's not really meant for indoor shots. Are you shooting RAW or jpeg?

No VR, and I am in JPEG (fine). Sounds like I need to use the 18-55mm kit lens instead of the 70-300? I also have a monopod I can take to help with the zoom in shots. Thanks for all the feedback, I'll try to post some pics when I get back.

TheWengler
02-01-2008, 10:03 AM
I believe your standard zoom and your telephoto zoom are both f/5.6 max at the long end? This means that as far as achieving a fast shutter speed at the telephoto end they will be the same. However, you will be able to get more reach with the telephoto lens so try that. The monopod will help you keep things steady.

toriaj
02-01-2008, 06:53 PM
I believe your standard zoom and your telephoto zoom are both f/5.6 max at the long end? This means that as far as achieving a fast shutter speed at the telephoto end they will be the same. However, you will be able to get more reach with the telephoto lens so try that. The monopod will help you keep things steady.

This is a very valid point (wish I'd thought of it :rolleyes:.) So the only disadvantage to using the 70-300mm would be the camera shake at more than 1/400 or 1/500 sec shutter speed. So just be sure to use your monopod.

Big Daddy
02-02-2008, 07:47 PM
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c139/TOROM/HorsePull08013.jpg
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c139/TOROM/HorsePull08008.jpg
http://i26.photobucket.com/albums/c139/TOROM/HorsePull08006.jpg

I think things turned out great considering I was the one taking the pictures!:) I really appreciate everyone's help and I think I'm getting the hang of this. Thanks again.:)

pas49ras
02-03-2008, 05:15 AM
Nice shots Big Daddy..did you use the same white ballance for all 3 shots? #2 looks more natural. What settings/lens did you wind up using? Most times, its trial and error with indoor events. Thats the beauty of digital.

Big Daddy
02-03-2008, 11:16 AM
I used the 70-300 lense with the camera in Manual mode and I changed the ISO to 1600. Not sure about the white balance, I've not looked into that yet, I'm still learning all the other things!:)

faisal
02-03-2008, 11:50 AM
nice pictures there.....