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View Full Version : New D70 and Sigma 18-125 Producing Tan Hue



azsooner
01-02-2005, 05:22 PM
I just purchased a new D70 and haven't had much time to test it out. However, I have taken a few pics of my son playing with his friends and I have early concerns. Admittedly, I haven't taken the time to line up the perfect shot. However, I need to make a decision as to whether or not I should return the Sigma lens by 1/10.

My current setup is a a D70 Body with a Sigma 18-125 lens, B&W UV Haz filter, and the Point and Shoot (White Wedding) curve is loaded.

The pictures have been taken under semi-cloudy conditions.

Primarily, I have noticed that most of the pictures have a tan hue, colors are muted, and the kids complexions are some what artificial looking. Based on the reviews I have read, I was expecting the D70 to perform better than this out of the box. I realize that there is post processing required to create great pictures. Could this be caused by my decision to purchase the Sigma lens rather than going with the Nikon kit lens, or is it just a matter of me becoming more familiar with the camera and Nikon Capture software?

Any input you can give would be great.

Jeff

D70FAN
01-02-2005, 05:47 PM
I just purchased a new D70 and haven't had much time to test it out. However, I have taken a few pics of my son playing with his friends and I have early concerns. Admittedly, I haven't taken the time to line up the perfect shot. However, I need to make a decision as to whether or not I should return the Sigma lens by 1/10.

My current setup is a a D70 Body with a Sigma 18-125 lens, B&W UV Haz filter, and the Point and Shoot (White Wedding) curve is loaded.

The pictures have been taken under semi-cloudy conditions.

Primarily, I have noticed that most of the pictures have a tan hue, colors are muted, and the kids complexions are some what artificial looking. Based on the reviews I have read, I was expecting the D70 to perform better than this out of the box. I realize that there is post processing required to create great pictures. Could this be caused by my decision to purchase the Sigma lens rather than going with the Nikon kit lens, or is it just a matter of me becoming more familiar with the camera and Nikon Capture software?

Any input you can give would be great.

Jeff

Put the camera in Auto. Set the white balance to auto. Set the ISO to 200 (auto off). This is the starting point. Shoot a few frames and compare. I rarely use the scene modes as they have a tendancy to reset the white balance to some unwanted color temp, in this case it is set to offset a lot of white and warm the picture, as seems to be the case here.

I typically shoot in Aperture Priority, and Auto white balance unless conditions warrant something else. The lens has nothing to do with it. What is a B&W UV haze filter? Compared to a color UV haze filter...

azsooner
01-02-2005, 06:41 PM
George,

Thanks as always. I will try what you suggest. I was using program mode and following the directions in Haber's D70 for Digital Newbies. Auto sounds like a much better place to start.

Regarding the filter, B&W is the brand. Sorry for the confusion on that is should have left the B&W part off.

Jeff

D70FAN
01-02-2005, 07:22 PM
George,

Thanks as always. I will try what you suggest. I was using program mode and following the directions in Haber's D70 for Digital Newbies. Auto sounds like a much better place to start.

Regarding the filter, B&W is the brand. Sorry for the confusion on that is should have left the B&W part off.

Jeff

I don't doubt that Haber's book on the D70 is authorative, but he should pass along the effects of programming for bright white contrast in normal light. It would be intersting to know what settings are in the white wedding curve program.

Not a problem. Guess I'm too accustomed to seeing Cokin on the filter, and it never dawned on me that it was the brand name. I typically shoot without the UV/Haze filter, and trust that the lens cap will supply the protection. I'm not sure it makes much difference except in my mind, and it makes a lot of people uncomfortable to leave the lens unprotected when the cap is off. I do use the UV/Haze filter when shooting landscapes where haze comes into play. Since there is a built-in UV filter on the sensor, it kindof negates the need for this part of the filter function.

Anyway let us know how it comes out.

azsooner
01-02-2005, 09:28 PM
I ran a quick test using Auto by taking a couple of flash pictures. They seem much better on my monitor. They still print a little dark on my cheapo ink jet. However, I sent two copies of one of them (one unprocessed, the other white balanced and sharpened) off to ShutterFly to see how they come out.

Regarding the filter. You are correct, I'd rather keep the lens clean and not risk scratching it when I clean it or knock into something. Other than that, the filter serves no purpose.

Jeff

D70FAN
01-03-2005, 05:37 AM
I ran a quick test using Auto by taking a couple of flash pictures. They seem much better on my monitor. They still print a little dark on my cheapo ink jet. However, I sent two copies of one of them (one unprocessed, the other white balanced and sharpened) off to ShutterFly to see how they come out.

Regarding the filter. You are correct, I'd rather keep the lens clean and not risk scratching it when I clean it or knock into something. Other than that, the filter serves no purpose.

Jeff

I normally run in Aperture Priority, auto white balance, and adjust the ISO (and white balance) to the conditions. Since I never touch the lens glass, cleaning is a simple brushing with a camelhair artist brush (also used to clean the camera frequently especially around the lens mount).

Rain Again. But it's a dry rain! :) And back to work. Happy New(wet) Year. Looks like the draught may be at an end.

toddmt
01-05-2005, 06:17 AM
The problem could be with your monitor. I am totally depressed now that I have bought my camera (Olympus C-765), have photoshop, and can make my pictures look wonderful with a little touch up in photoshop.... but

I print my pictures (untouched or retouched) at the lab or my printer and the color is nothing like what the monitor shows. I have adjusted everything possible. Time for a new monitor.

4walls
01-05-2005, 08:05 PM
I am not familiar with B&W filters. You should try shooting a couple of pictures
with the filter off the lens. Compare them to shots with the filter.

I tried the Sigma lens and the Nikon kit lens in a test shoot today. Found the Sigma had quite a different color hue to the pictures. Didn't buy the Sigma.

azsooner
01-06-2005, 05:36 AM
I did some playing around with the camera, removed the White Wedding Curve, etc and the brown hue has gone away. I found George's recommendations regarding camera settings to be much more useful than Haber's web site.

Next, I printed the NEF files directly from Photoshop Elements rather than Nikon Capture and the darkness went away as well. It seems Elements is a much better package if you just want to open the picture and print without spending a lot of processing time. Now I'm trying to decide if it's worth keeping Capture at all. Can anyone that has utilized both products think of a reason to keep both Capture and Elements?

Jeff

D70FAN
01-06-2005, 03:59 PM
I did some playing around with the camera, removed the White Wedding Curve, etc and the brown hue has gone away. I found George's recommendations regarding camera settings to be much more useful than Haber's web site.

Next, I printed the NEF files directly from Photoshop Elements rather than Nikon Capture and the darkness went away as well. It seems Elements is a much better package if you just want to open the picture and print without spending a lot of processing time. Now I'm trying to decide if it's worth keeping Capture at all. Can anyone that has utilized both products think of a reason to keep both Capture and Elements?

Jeff

Jeff, sorry, can't help you on this one as I have never used Nikon Capture. Photoshop always seems to work well. Hope someone else can answer this.