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herc182
11-16-2007, 02:04 AM
Thought it would be nice to know what you guys do and how you became obsessed with photos :D

I am a civil engineer in london (Victoria) and started my photography with a CANON (:eek:) APS film camera. It was ok for what it was and more than enough for me at that stage. I then bought (as a joke) a £45 0.3MP camera (yes thats right 0.3MP). It was a keyring type thing but i ended taking it with me to New york and mexico and taking pics with it. it was the most awful thing on the face of the planet. I could have sketched better. Needless to say when I tried to download the pics, it became corrupted and i lost a load of holiday snaps. not too happy....

I should mention that my brother got me into photography even if he did use shoddy equipment (canon :)). However, i lost all respect for him last weekend when we headed to new forrest to take some photos and he was snapping away on his canon 5D 50mm f1.4 on AUTO!!!!!!:eek::eek: I immediately called my mother and asked about the milkman and postman approximately 32 years and 9 months ago....

Then I got my first serious camera. The Panasonic FZ20 (thanks to Jeff for his glowing review). I loved this thing. Small, great pic quality and loved the lens. However four things made me upgrade it:

1 - iso performance. Looked like i was taking photos through bubble wrap.
2 - i picked the silver colour (please dont ask. I am still wondering whether I was drunk at the time)
3 - Auto focus hunted a lot in darker environments.
4 - Lack of good bokeh

Anyway, i mostly shot outdoors which was fine, and I took so many pics with it. I sold it on ebay with great sadness but to a fellow Portuguese countryman. I hope he can take good pictures on his farm with it :p

I now own all that in my signature. I got the fuji as a carry around compact for its great low light performance (and because I went on a trip to Bath (UK) and forgot my Fz20 (what a tit) and was forced to buy something or risk walking around the city taking MENTAL photos).

I bought the D80 on a whim (well i researched it to buggery actually but then i marched into jessops and got the sigma wide angle too!) then hit ebay with no common sense and a lot of mouse clicking. I now have a good healthy debt on my credit card and have not cut my wrists yet as I love my camera too much...ahemm.....shit, I mean my girlfriend (have got stop writing that or she might get jealous and scratch my lenses....or worse, smear them with her finger prints. Just thinking of that has made me queasy. will go and give them a clean just in case they have collected dust in my vacuum sealed safe...)

Right, now for a flash on ebay....

Hope to hear from you guys!

XaiLo
11-16-2007, 05:45 AM
I got into photography when I was in highschool. Used my aunts Konica to take pictures of my friends. Had a lot of fun with that camera... it got damage in a too long to explain tale by someone else. That was the end of that. :( So life continued on and for several several years I did not give photography another serious go. I looked at and read up on SLRs here and there, until I bought a Canon S2/S3 to help out with my design business frustrated by it's limitations I decided to get a DSLR.

I'm currently also marketing a fantastic functional beverage GPB ( Guaranteed Potency Beverage) that's doing quite well in the marketplace. And a budding photography business. :)

herc182
11-16-2007, 06:01 AM
Whats your Budding photography business (PM me if it cant be put in the forum :)).

Whats 2% in your signature? I have not slept well in 4 days so excuse me if its obvious!!

domenic
11-16-2007, 06:24 AM
I work as a Technician in an NHS Hospital, 'Biomedical Engineering Dept'.

I've only recently got into photography, but always intrigued some at the images I saw in various magazine, and I love the idea of being able to capture nature in the moment, or creating images of my own. I guess it's stirred a creative side I didn't realise I had.
Which is a refershing change from the type of work im in, where your'e ruled by laws of physics and maths etc.

Dom

tcadwall
11-16-2007, 07:42 AM
Is there a limit on how long a post can be? jk...

myself: Not the young, reckless person I once was, but I am still busy as heck. Married, father of 2 - one auditioning as I write for acceptance to an expensive university for "music theater", minor in "broadcast communications". My interests are all over the board with photography just being one of them - and currently one that is a higher priority that others. Also in there, I am a violinist, have a computer science degree, .net developer (with a consulting firm), small business owner / entreprenuer, and becoming interested in building a boat. I used to spend a lot of time behind a lens of a digital camcorder, and a computer - using "Avid Liquid" for a NLE (video editing).

Most of you have probably picked up on the fact that my startup business is a home and small business inventory service. If you are interested further, my pathetic, but gradually improving website is www.inventorypeople.com (http://www.inventorypeople.com) I believe that one or two shots on my website were taken by forum posters... Though one of them has not been very active lately.

Before I bought Nikon, I had (still have but rarely use) a FujiFilm FinePix S5100. It is quite good for an older P&S. When I started my business, I thought I would be using that camera, but when testing the software that I developed for running the business, and testing the inventory process, I realized that the P&S was just not going to cut it, because I wanted full, managed control of the settings so that I could move quicker through the inventory process. I also needed a camera that would work better in dark corners for instance, since often I have to crawl behind entertainment systems, etc. to get pictures of serial numbers, etc. So at the time, the D70s was the best available solution without killing my startup budget. I jumped in with the D70s, 18-200mm, and SB-600 and a bunch of other accessories after doing a ton of research. Nice thing about the amount of research that I did, was that I learned a ton about what I needed, and photography in general.

That was it. I caught the photography bug.

I have since sold some shots here and there, and done a small amount of work for hire (though the pay hasn't been great yet). So I am considering starting another "branch" of my business with the photography side.

Oh - I'll skip back a little for another kinda interesting piece of history... A little over 10 years ago (early to mid 90's), I was a software developer for a small company. We developed a video booking/lineup system for jails, and later spawned an id system from it. The kewl thing about it was that back then, it was pretty much cutting edge. We used Sony CCD camera heads (think security cameras) that connected to the computer via Truvision, and later Integral technologies video capture cards. When we switched to Integral cards, we started using a flash head that would go off with the click of the mouse. These interlaced ccd's were a joy to work with, and the timing had to be perfect to get the flash and capture to properly expose everytime. I did a TON of R&D with that company with flash heads, bounces, pc configurations, etc. I also was out on many technical sales calls, helped put together RFPs', did software interfaces for mainframes and other large systems, and gheesh more that I have forgotten. I loved the work, but the 90hour weeks took a toll on me.

Cheers, hope I didn't bore ya'll

herc182
11-16-2007, 09:33 AM
blimey tcadwall. Some history you got there? build a boat? I would never trust myself not to leave a hole in it.

Interesting website / business. I would want all my photographic equipment photographed :-)

JBO
11-16-2007, 09:48 AM
I never was into photography and always had a point and shoot camera. I just never got the images I wanted with it. One day I said thats it and I went to Circuit City and asked the guy for the best camera he had in the store. He pointed me to the Nikon D80 and the rest in history.

Since buying the camera, I have really gotten into photography. I am now using all of the features on the camera and probably will upgrade in a few years to the higher end dslr cameras

I am a teacher and coach by the way

JOsh

tcadwall
11-16-2007, 09:53 AM
Well, the boat building is something that I am researching for the future. My current priorities are obviously, getting my kids through college, making my business extremely profitable, and getting out of the daily grind. Once those happen, I will actually start giving more attention to the boat idea. I don't get to work with my hands much (except when something on a car or house needs work) so it is a bit therapeutic, not to mention that I like fishing. I don't want to just buy a boat, because I want it to be something that I make exactly how I want it to be. That is a whole other thing.... lol. There is a great website for people that find it interesting http://www.glenl.com

If anyone would like to throw me suggestions or offer me photos for my website, just PM me!

Ohhh you guys probably already figured it out, but some might consider me extremely ADD... fortunately, I grew up before that was the disease du jour - so was never officially labeled

herc182
11-16-2007, 09:54 AM
what do you teach / coach if you dont mind me asking?

mugsisme
11-16-2007, 10:04 AM
I am a stay at home mom (to seven kids) now. I did start off as a teacher. I taught first grade for more years than I care to say. At the same time, I also decorated cakes on the side. I did quit decorating cakes 7 years ago, and stopped teaching 6 years ago. I go into photography because I wanted a DSLR to take pictures of my kids. I was sick and tired of pushing the button, and the kid would move before the camera would take the picture. BUT, I was never, ever going to be that geek with a tons of lenses. Nope, just my camera and lens and flash. BUT, you all know what happens. You start to try to do other things, and suddenly, you ARE that geek you thought you would never become. :p I mean it in a loving way.

I will never, ever do it professionally, because, for me, I learned that the best way to kill the excitement is to do it because you have to do it.

Fun reading about everyone else!

dxrocnxj
11-16-2007, 10:46 AM
i dot know how i got into photography and its so recent that i did too. id see a lot of people calling some random crappy photos their photography and quite frankly it made me upset haha. so since im the person tht loves triumphing past people and proving others wrong, i wanted to do it myself and show em how its done. but now that im taking pictures, its just like a relxing type thing. im realizing the memories this camera holds for me and the memories it will keep for me in the future and im also now learning that a picture really holdds more than an image.

anyways im a history major, and ill be a high school teacher in a few years, but i will be a photo minor and hopefully nail some freelance in my off summers.:)

fionndruinne
11-16-2007, 12:35 PM
Hey, neat thread!

Well, I am the son of a farmer.:rolleyes: So everything that traditionally comes along with that (mainly poverty, heheh) holds true. Was never into the helter-skelter life of SoCal where I grew up, moved almost four years ago to south coastal Oregon, and kind of kept up the country lifestyle... which isn't working for me now. I work at a sporting goods store (not really my first retail job, as I've marketed farm produce for years), and am harboring dreams of being an author. Not an easy task, as it requires more discipline than I had expected or enjoy, but hey, my first book is about forty pages along.:p

I've always been a bit of an artist, into drawing and sketching a lot growing up. I tended to prefer photography to painting, so I went in that direction (in the old days, with a crappy cheap 35mm camera or *gasp* disposables), always have loved nature. I took a ton of photos on a couple of camping trips in the redwoods of northern Ca. I got an Olympus digital four or so years ago for a trip to Alaska. Took many thousands (I'd estimate over 50,000) of photos with that thing. But it's terribly antiquated. So this year, scraping together some savings, I took the plunge and got my D40, and as they say, the rest is... well, history I guess. The price of the DSLR investment made sure that I learned the ins and outs sooner rather than later - how else was I going to justify $550 on a camera? Now I don't look back. Photography satisfies both my rogue gear-headedness and my desire to create art, and is a welcome way of getting outside when my scribbled words become anathema to me.

Jason25
11-16-2007, 01:17 PM
I first started photography when shooting and developing film for my yearbook way back in middle school, then stopped for awhile. When I was 18, I received my first digital camera (1mp HP) for a Christmas gift. I had a few P&S cameras over the next few years, then got a Sony H1 in 05. That's when I started getting serious again, then consequently got a D50, D70s and now my D200.

As for the real world, I work in IT.

erichlund
11-16-2007, 02:48 PM
I went to Circuit City and asked the guy for the best camera he had in the store. He pointed me to the Nikon D80 and the rest in history.


Josh, Good thing you didn't go to a real camera store. They would have walked past all those pretty dSLRs and said, "Lets talk about Medium Format." However, before we start, we'll need a reference from your banker. ;)

*********************

I went to school at the U.S. Air Force Academy and spent a few years (13) flying airplanes (Mainly the C-141A/B Starlifter, 4 engine jet transport). My hobbies back then were computers, camping, gardening and 35mm photography. My first camera beyond the basic cheap grocery store specials was a Canon A-1, which I used off and on for about 23 years. I even got to do a little darkroom, though I never really had time to persue that.

After the Gulf War, I got out and went back to school, got a Computer Science degree (master's, who needs a second bachelor's degree) and got a job as a software engineer, which is what I still do. I've worked mostly in the defense industry, so that means I work almost exclusively on Unix systems.

I also took up woodworking (one of the projects I have to get done is a boat, of all things, though a very simple one, and it's waaayyyy on the back burner). My wife also has hobbies, but we decided to take one up together, so we'd see each other once in a while. For this reason, we took up ballroom dancing, which we've been doing for about 4 years now. Just this week, we bought a Yamaha keyboard so I can learn to play the piano. After all, I have so much free time on my hands. :rolleyes:

My first digital camera was a Coolpix 990. It was a revelation. I had kind of given up on photography, because I was tired of the film hassle. It tied in nicely with my computer hobby. After that camera got dropped, fixed, and dropped again, I bought a Nikon D70. I got my wife a Canon S60 so she wouldn't drop my D70 (plus, she really doesn't want to bother with another SLR type camera, she had a Canon T50, IIRC, which was compatible with my A-1's FD lenses). The Canon A-1, D70, and S60 were all stolen in a burglary. I replaced the D70 with the D200 and the S60 with an S70. Two years and 8 lenses later, here I am.

Oh, I forgot. One more hobby. I'm something of a consumer (can't call myself a collector) of fine wines. Amongst my assemblage of over 200 bottles, my prize posession is a bottle of Opus One, to be opened some time around our 35th wedding anniversary (since that's when it's due to peak).

Corwyn
11-16-2007, 04:03 PM
I own a small business installing VOIP PBX system and structured cabling.

After high school I went on a backpack trip for the summer to Greece, Israel and Egypt. A firend of my mom loaned me a 35mm minolta with a few lenses. Because I had the nicest camera I became the defacto photographer for the trip. Even though I had no real clue about what I was doing. The friend ended up giving me the camera when I returned.

I switched to digital a few years ago when one of my kids droped my minolta.

ssil2000
11-16-2007, 04:46 PM
hi everyone, cool thread!
i am a jack of all trades, i have run restaurants done construction been an insurance broker, worked in IT for around 10 years now i work within the superannuation field here in australia (retirement funds).
i have lived in canada italy australia then canada again then australia again :)

i have travelled quite a bit, my first camera was a pentax film camera, still have it somewhere, migrated to digital a few years ago with an olympus c750UZ ( took that on my world trip a couple of years ago, you can have a look at some of the photos taken with that camera and a cheap ass lens here www.sergiosilvestri.com (site seems to be down right now, looking into cause)

then on that trip my camera went flying out of the vehicle in the middle of the bush in kenya, and needless to say it has not been the same since... but this year when i was back in canada i finally got myself a nice camera and some decent leses to start to really learning about exposure lighting etc... just wish i had more time for photography!

anyway enough from me!

Sergio

Prospero
11-16-2007, 05:00 PM
Very nice thread. Interesting to read all those stories.

I got into photography when I was 16 years old, about 4 years ago. Before that I had taken pictures with disposable cameras, but nothing more than that. I got that camera because we were going on a schooltrip to York, UK, and I wanted to get better shots than you would get from a disposable.

I used the camera a lot during holidays and schooltrips. Gradually I started outgrow that camera. I wanted more control, better low-light performance, and a much wider angle. Making panormas of buildings because they did not fit in the 35mm field of view started to become annoying.

In the meantime I had done several jobs: I worked in a indoor ski center, I worked in a tomato greenhouse, and for a few years now I have been a waiter in a restaurant. Using the money I got from these jobs I decided to get a new camera. First I was thinking of getting a Canon S2, but then the price of the Nikon D50 dropped to a reasonable price so I got that one instead. Looking back I am glad I got the D50 straight away.

After having bought the D50, I felt somehow oblidged to use it more often than just during the holidays. After all, the camera had cost me a lot of money. For that reason I decided to start taking landscape shots in the neighbourhood of my hometown. More and more I started to like it, and the results were starting to improve. I kept going back to the same places trying to find new angles and compositions. I think this has improved my compositions a lot.

One year ago I went to university in Delft to study Aerospace engeneering. I also joint a student club, where I now take lots of pictures at parties and events. Later that year I moved out of my parents house to a house much closer to my university. I now live in a student home with three other students. I really like it. Though it took some getting used to, I really like the indepence.

Other hobbies besides photography are cycling, watching movies, and reading. I mostly read English literature, basically everything from Shakespeare to contemporary stuff. Andrew, let us know when your book is in the stores, would love to read it :). I don't spend as much time on those hobbies as I would like, though. Photography, school, my job and parties at my student club take up most my time.

AdamW
11-16-2007, 05:25 PM
I got into photography when I was 16 years old, about 4 years ago.

I kinda assumed you were a lot older based on your camera skills and your general level of maturity! And if English is not your first language, then I'm damn impressed. Dutch public schools?

Prospero
11-16-2007, 05:45 PM
I kinda assumed you were a lot older based on your camera skills and your general level of maturity! And if English is not your first language, then I'm damn impressed. Dutch public schools?

Thanks Adam. Here in the Netherland there is not really a division in public schools and private schools like in other countries. Here students do a test at the end of primary school which determines which school you go to after primary school. There are 5 different levels, ranging from very practical education to much more theoretical. To go to university you need to do the highest level. My school also offered this as a bilingual stream. Halve my courses were given in English and the other half in Dutch.

This was a great preparation for university where all of my lectures and books are in English.

Anyway, foreign languages are a very important part of the education in here, because we are such a small country that largely depends on international trade.

LR Max
11-16-2007, 06:37 PM
Ya'll won't believe this one...

Back in middle school (about 14 years ago) I got a Kodak 35mm POS camera. Just to let ya'll know how crappy it was, it cost $35 new. I used it and everyone thought I took good photos.

My mom got a digital camera about 8 years ago. It was a Sony P&S. I called it the brick because...well...it was! I used it and loved it.

I went off to college (majoring in Mechanical Engineering, I still am!!) and missed having the brick. So one day my buddy swings by my dorm room and says, "Hey, you wanna go to Best Buy?" I thought, eh, why not. I walked outta that store with a Sony DSC-P8, lock stock n' barrel. With this camera, I concentrated on how to compose photos. I had no idea what ISO, shutter speed, and apeture was.

Two years later, I bought a Fuji S602Z second hand from some guy on campus. It was a good camera, but very finicky. In fact, every Fuji I've used can have slight issues that other cameras don't have a problem with. One day I looked at the school newspaper at the front page. I saw the photo. It sucked. I said to myself, "I could take a better picture!! And I am an idiot!!" I joined the local newspaper

Still, I ran it for a year and then one day my memory card failed (the Fuji killed it). So I sent it back to Sandisk (lifetime warranty, I only buy sandisk now :D), but in the meantime, I decided I wanted to up my camera. So I got drunk one night, went on Ebay and bought a reconditioned Nikon D70s. The D70s taught me all about how cameras really work. I figured out how to manipulate everything and do it properly.

I sold my Fuji and took my D70s to a local off roading competition (thats kinda my thing). Everyone said, "Hey! You should send those photos into CRAWL magazine!!" I said, "To who??"

I did this, and then they hired me as their east coast photographer and writer :confused:. Every issue I have a ton of articles in there and peoples are ALWAYS asking me to come cover their events. I am booked solid for the next half year. I have no idea how this happened but I am glad it did because it bailed me outta my dead end job.

Everyone says I take great photos and loves having me go to events. The company flies me places all over the east coast. I pretty much have free reign to do what I want and the company does not micromanage me at all. Whatever I produce, everyone likes and it gets printed.

I was recently at an event doing a feature vehicle and I overheard the owner of the feature vehicle say, "I am glad he is here. He is one of the better photographers." :eek:

I don't know how or why I am in my position, but its fun and everyone enjoys having me around. Its great! I still don't think I am all that great of a photographer but this attitude drives me to be better.

BTW, I am still a mechanical engineer...

swpars
11-16-2007, 07:42 PM
What led me to a Nikon? Well, it's been a long road.

In 1972, for his college graduation present, my dad got a Minolta SLR camera with a couple lenses -- all of which he still has. He took that Minolta to India for three months and took some impressive pictures on the primitive color film of the day.

Dad shot with the Minolta until maybe 1985, when he got a Nikon Action Touch waterproof point & shoot camera. The first camera I remember was that Nikon, and it shot lots of great pictures (included several I took while swimming underwater when I was a kid).

Fast forward to 2003. I'm a senior in college and my parents gave me a Toshiba 2.2 mpx digital camera for my birthday. While primitive, that camera freed me from the cost and hassle of developing film and got me into the world of digital photography. I still own that camera and have since acquired a Nikon Coolpix 4600 (which is a great little P&S) and a Kodak Z612 superzoom (would-be SLR).

I was pretty happy with the pictures the Kodak produced, and would have kept shooting with it for a while had it been better at low light photography. Sadly -- it's not -- it's still a P&S. Meanwhile, a couple of my friends acquired Canon Digital Rebel and Rebel XT SLRs, and started pressuring me to buy a Canon as well if I got an SLR.

Well, I wasn't totally impressed with the Canon photo quality (especially out of the Rebel XT). Could have been user error, but the fact of the matter was that a lot of the Canon pictures were not exposed correctly. I'm thinking it must have been user error, since I've seen some really impressive shots out of a Rebel XT/EOS 350D on this site. Plus, the Canon communities on the internet that I initially visited didn't seem like user groups I'd want to get involved with (ie: photo.net)

Then, while looking for information about the Nikon D40 (which I had heard rumblings about here and there) I stumbled across Ken Rockwell's site. Love him or hate him, Ken turned me on to the world of Nikons. I wanted Auto ISO in modes other than the full AUTO mode, spot metering, and backwards compatibility with older manual focus lenses for experimenting down the road. Once I read more about the Nikon selection of lenses (the consumer-grade 55-200 VR and 18-200 VR really sold me) it was clear to me that I should get a D40. And so I did.

And I'm an accountant for a publicly traded company during the workweek.

TNB
11-16-2007, 08:36 PM
In high school, I took one semester of film photography then helped teach the second semester. However, the film camera sat forever when school life changed to work life in various fields, including civilian, military, and government sectors.

After being reactivated and reinjured, I searched for some sort of hobby since I could no longer enjoy the physical activities I had done in the past nor afford to enjoy those paid for by the military/government. And since my sisters and brother pathetically squabbled over photos of my father after my father died, I decided that I wanted something more capable than my Sony P&S to take photos. At what level was the next question?

Eventually, I purchased a Nikon D50 and immediately combined remote control racing with photography which is one of the hobbies I picked up after forgoing cross-county skiing, racquetball, parachuting, target shooting, etc. About one month after the Nikon D50 purchase I was asked to write an article and do a product shoot in California. Of course, the dabbling in photography has resulted in additional publications, additional camera equipment, and additional time surfing the web.

Ironically, I’ve ended up at more sporting events recently and a broader range of sports than I would have previously considered when actually participating in sports.

fionndruinne
11-16-2007, 09:05 PM
This is a really great thread!

Gintaras
11-17-2007, 02:20 AM
wow, is this a late confession thread? only Nikonians allowed?:p

Rooz
11-17-2007, 02:43 AM
great idea phil ! (no, gintaras, i don;t think this is a nikon only thread, it's about photography in general so pls post away. :) )

i did photography in highschool and fell in love with processing B&W images in the darkroom. i loved the way an image just magically materialised and so from then on i was hooked. i stuck with film thru the digital "revolution" vowing never to own a digital slr, conceding only by buying a coolpix 5700 for snapshots.

over the years, i found myself shooting with the coolpix more and more just for the sheer convenience and immediacy of digital and the fact that i could rattle off hundreds of images and pick only the ones i wanted. but more importantly it allowed me to convert anything into B&W without having to use B&W film. as the skills in film processing slowly diminished and all my shooting buddies leapt into DSLR, i began thinking more seriously about getting my own dslr.

then my son was born. it changed everything cos my wife insisted to throw that old crappy film camera away and get with the next century. she was adamant that we had to have a decent camera to take memorable images. the coolpix wasn;t going to cut it and she did not want to use film cos she'd have to wait too long to get prints back and wanted to email picsof course.

so, off i went, i walked into a store ready to buy a 400d or 30d since i was always a canon user and then fell in love with the nikon's once i laid my hands on them. the next day my canon slr and lens collection went on ebay and that was that.

needless to say given that the vast majority of my mates shoot canon, i was the butt of endless jokes. given the release of the d300/ d3 the scales have slowly began evening out as alot of them have pre-ordered the d300 and some even the D3. the dark side is now well and truly the weapon of choice. as it always was really !

so now onto the new age...wireless flash and macro have intensified my love of photography and i'm getting more and more commisions and more and more work so what started out as a great fun hobby is now starting to pay for itself. it will never replace my work, but it's certianly giving me some play money now.

Gintaras
11-17-2007, 04:09 AM
I was never a photo freak. I got my first camera long ago as a present from parents, all manual B&W film. Later as everyone I had cheap plastic P&S film. And then I got into digital thinking this was cool, so got CPX885. Only then I began to discover photography and later upgraded to CPX995 and then shortly to Sony 717. However as a true point-shooter I also got two Canons digital Elphs.

I must say thanks to a friend of mine who is a photo freak with his 20D and introduced me to creative imaging. Only then I saw something that made me want DSLR. I was deciding on which camera for about a year before I got my XTi. As a newcomer in DSLR world I thought the image quality depends on the gear. Only then I understood that this is a photographer, not the gear. Now I am a happy shooter willing to go on imaging "rampage" whenever possible to the disappointment of my wife.;)

I admire style and creativity in everything I do, and find photography to be the best way to express this.:rolleyes:

XaiLo
11-17-2007, 09:02 PM
Whats your Budding photography business (PM me if it cant be put in the forum :)).

Whats 2% in your signature? I have not slept well in 4 days so excuse me if its obvious!!

Well it all started when a family at my church asked me to take a family portrait of them. Then Pastor was viewing some photo's on my LCD saw one of himself and said he wanted one this big (motioned with his hands the size) I printed him 16x20. Then I printed a picture of three lovely ladies at a yard sale. They all purchased a copy I also printed some retouched pictures and they sold. And since then people have been asking me to take photo's. I've since built a website where they can view and order prints. I'm working on my first campaign so we'll see how it goes.

Regarding the signiture as rawpaw18 correctly surmized in another thread it's a reminder to myself to work towards a new camera, didn't occur to me that it would actually peek anyones interest... go figure, live and learn. lol

r3g
11-17-2007, 09:46 PM
I do it for the LULZ. :rolleyes:

yewsef
11-17-2007, 11:19 PM
When I was a kid I loved the idea of watching old photos. The very idea of watching something that happened before you're born is amusing. The more I get older, the more valuable these photos get. So, every 1-2 years I just remember to check all the albums we had at home, when I do, the photos really feel so valuable. The way everyone looked decades ago. You watch them older now, then look at the photo. You see the moments that have passed. A time machine. I was jealous that I didn't take these photos, they were my brother's. So, I always wanted to take photos to save them, hide them and make them feel valuable.

That was long time ago though. As for now, everyone and their dog can take photos. Cellphones, Computers, and so many ways to take photos. Everyone's holding a camera with their hands now(cellphone) and the photos don't feel "valuable" anymore. So, I guess what intrigues me about photography now is the Quality of the image and the Artistic view. So, I guess I took a one step further. Instead of making them feel old, I want to make them feel Professional and Artistic. The only way to do that is to get a DSLR!

Gintaras
11-18-2007, 03:09 AM
I kinda assumed you were a lot older based on your camera skills and your general level of maturity! And if English is not your first language, then I'm damn impressed. Dutch public schools?

Adam, right, in a few of continental Europe and North Europe you find little difference between public and private schools, in fact some public schools would be rated above private. I met one British guy for business but we had a chat about just everything later. He told me that just about two decades ago many Brit parents would send their kids to schools in France, no joke. First of all France had many public schools so Brits were allowed for free, second French schools were giving better education compared to Brit schools at that time. However with private schooling making progress today Brit schools are on high level, so no French schools anymore and rich French today place their kids to UK schools. :-)

As for English fluency you will be surprised by that when on a visit to Netherlands, Denmark or Sweden. Not mention even a cleaning lady or taxi driver there having excellent command of English.

swpars
11-18-2007, 09:45 AM
As for English fluency you will be surprised by that when on a visit to Netherlands, Denmark or Sweden. Not mention even a cleaning lady or taxi driver there having excellent command of English.

Gintaras, on a side note, I'm going to Zurich for the first time in less than a week for work, which will also be my first trip off the North American continent (!!!), and I was concerned because I don't speak a word of German.

After talking with some co-workers who have gone over there previously, apparently virtually everyone over there speaks at least passable English :D

Aldor88
11-18-2007, 10:05 AM
Nice thread, didn't read all the stories yet but will do later.

How did i get into photography? well I'm not 100% sure...I got my first camera when i was 16(3 years ago), it was a canon P&S. I bought it mostly for picture's from party's and friends etc(teen stuff:rolleyes:). It was not a great camera, it wasn't bad either tho and i got some great pictures once in a while.
Already back then i started looking at a better camera, mostly the Canon EOS-350D. I never had the money to buy one tho since i spent it all on silly stuff like playstation2 games :o.

A few years passed by and I almost forgot about photography with all the school work I had to deal with. This summer tho I had 5 months of absolutely nothing to do. Three of them i laid home doing nothing, basicly being a slob. Then i got fed up went to work and decided to buy myself a camera to keep myself occupied :).

And here we are, i bought the D40 1.5months ago and I'm loving it. It changed the way i look at thing's theres a potential photo in everything now and my computer is filled with photographs. I've never really been into hobbies but i see what the fuss is about now and I'm happy to say i got one that will last for life.
I don't see myself working with photography, to me it's a way to unplug from the world around me. When I'm out taking picture's its the next shot that matters. Nothing else.

The negative thing is the lust for new lenses and gear that comes along, my wish list gets longer by the day.

So my journey into the world of photography has just begun, it all fits in to 3 years, most of it into the last two months. I got a lot to learn...

TNB
11-18-2007, 11:48 AM
As for English fluency you will be surprised by that when on a visit to Netherlands, Denmark or Sweden. Not mention even a cleaning lady or taxi driver there having excellent command of English.
You've probably here the old joke about "what do you call someone who only speaks one language?" An American (meaning from the USA and not including those from other parts of North America, Central America or South America). It's rather sad that most US schools don't have manditory foreign language courses since it may help with a better command of the English language as well as a better understanding of a foreign culture as well. Then again, I know parents who have moved overseas just so their children can get a "safer" and better education than that provided by the public school system.

erichlund
11-18-2007, 10:51 PM
You've probably here the old joke about "what do you call someone who only speaks one language?" An American (meaning from the USA and not including those from other parts of North America, Central America or South America). It's rather sad that most US schools don't have manditory foreign language courses since it may help with a better command of the English language as well as a better understanding of a foreign culture as well. Then again, I know parents who have moved overseas just so their children can get a "safer" and better education than that provided by the public school system.

In part, it depends on the school system. I for instance had to take foreign language classes in Jr. High, High School and Undergraduate College. Still, if you have no where to practice what you learn, you eventually forget. There are really two places on the North American continent (except some Carribean islands) where French is spoken by a significant portion of the population. I've never been to one, and only in the last few years visited the other.

OTOH, if you're a German learning French, you can pop across the border to Belgium, Luxembourg, France, or most parts of Switzerland. and practice to your hearts content. Heck, I'm sure there are plenty of people right in Germany you can practice on, especially near the borders of the aformentioned countries.

Here in Southern California, we are starting to develop a bit of a bilingual society, with all the immigration (legal and otherwise) from the nearby Spanish speaking countries.

And, I can give a very poignant example of insular behavior I came across in another country. While living in Hartford, Great Britain, we developed a friendship with a couple from Over. It seems that until we gave them a tour of some of our favorite places in London, they had never been to that great city, yet they had lived only about 60 miles (96km, for you that prefer that scale) away for more than 20 years.

I don't think any less of my friends for this. I'm glad I got to introduce them to a new experience, one they continued on a fairly regular basis, even after we left the country. To this day, I occasional meet someone who has never been on an airplane, or traveled any great distance from home. I find it no big deal. Different strokes for different folks, thats all. Language is really no different.

fionndruinne
11-18-2007, 11:26 PM
The majority of the public school system in the USA is a mess, and a large reason for it (albeit very unpopular, don't flame me please!) is that public school teachers are way too job-protected here, because we value education so highly that we don't exercise as much judgment as we should on the educators. They get the money regardless of whether they're effective, just because they "educate". We need a more competitive educative system, or just to get education-worship out of our heads and realize, as Europe still knows, that the trades are just as important as the "smart" work. Everyone here wants to be a doctor, in essence, so we'll pay anyone anything to "get us there".

Oops, that rambled. I'll pipe down now.:rolleyes:

Gintaras
11-19-2007, 02:55 AM
Gintaras, on a side note, I'm going to Zurich for the first time in less than a week for work, which will also be my first trip off the North American continent (!!!), and I was concerned because I don't speak a word of German.

After talking with some co-workers who have gone over there previously, apparently virtually everyone over there speaks at least passable English :D

Swpars, I believe you should not have problems there. Actually good English is spoken in major Swiss cities, as for province this depends, German part of Swiss is adept to using English, I am not sure for French or Italian parts of Swiss outside major cities. But you would have hard time in Italy or Spain if you do not speak local languages. If you ever go to Nordic Europe then I am sure you would be very impressed by fluency of English there.

I think Swiss is a great place to start your discovery of Europe. Swiss is a gem of beauty locked in the Alps. Use your time. It would be nice to rent a car and go around, but bear in mind that local rentals offer cars with mechanic gear for the most, so for having automatic you must pre-order (or may be you lucky they got one for you). If not, then you still find plenty of things to do despite the city gets calm and sleepy after 7pm, which might strike you. If I would be you I would try to use a few days from vacation to bridge to the weekend. You can fly back on Sunday then.

I live in Austria and travel to neighboring countries, so got some experience.

Gintaras
11-19-2007, 03:22 AM
You've probably here the old joke about "what do you call someone who only speaks one language?" An American (meaning from the USA and not including those from other parts of North America, Central America or South America). It's rather sad that most US schools don't have manditory foreign language courses since it may help with a better command of the English language as well as a better understanding of a foreign culture as well. Then again, I know parents who have moved overseas just so their children can get a "safer" and better education than that provided by the public school system.

TNB, I think you are not very fair to your fellas Americans. I met a few Americans in my life and many of them spoke almost fluent Spanish (to my great susprise), fewer of them used French. I was later told that Spanish becomes akin a second language for many Americans because of huge Spanish speaking population and plenty of business with Latam.

Interesting, I met some Brits and understand that most they speak English only, but those from top private schools would speak foreign languages too.

But nothing is worse than French or Spaniards :D
These guys speak only local lingo. French do so because of great pride, in fact they know English pretty well but refuse to speak in it. Spaniards, on contrary, would love to speak English or whatever langauge with you as nice people, but most they cannot!:rolleyes:

NB: sorry for generalising some of my experiences, this is just for fun and not a serious debate.

Gintaras
11-19-2007, 03:30 AM
TNB, KiWi, as for foreign languages I am not the one to boast. While my English is fluent my German (after living 7 years here) is still rather basic or call this intermediate.

However my daughter, going to a school, already has fluent German as her second mother tongue, then she also can speak English, learns French at school and now became interested in Japanese. Go figure how kids go like that, I only hope she does not lose the interest in this later.

As for schools here, unlike in the US where public schools are a mess, in Austria private schools are a mess and public schools are pretty strong. In fact private schools in Austria are nearly all from Catholic church, otherwise public.

herc182
11-19-2007, 06:48 AM
cant believe it. So far there has been no mention of lion taming, chiropody or lingerie designing.

Ah well, guess nikonians are fairly ordinary people then.

I am currently a touch bored at work and have been on ebay. I am currently "Watching" another circular polarisor (since i use just one for my wide angle and sigma 18-50), the sb-600 flash, a few old film cameras (with decent lenses) and an 85mm f1.8. roughly 7 hours before they all end.

I pray the god there is a power cut in about 6hrs 59mins or my xmas will be a hell of a lot worse than i thought....

now to call american express and inquire about something called a "limit" on my card....:confused:

erichlund
11-19-2007, 11:16 AM
The majority of the public school system in the USA is a mess, and a large reason for it (albeit very unpopular, don't flame me please!) is that public school teachers are way too job-protected here, because we value education so highly that we don't exercise as much judgment as we should on the educators. They get the money regardless of whether they're effective, just because they "educate". We need a more competitive educative system, or just to get education-worship out of our heads and realize, as Europe still knows, that the trades are just as important as the "smart" work. Everyone here wants to be a doctor, in essence, so we'll pay anyone anything to "get us there".

Oops, that rambled. I'll pipe down now.:rolleyes:

Unfortunately, there is only so much money. Schools cannot be everything to everyone. There are school systems in the larger cities that have different curriculums at different schools, emphasizing different purposes, such as college prep and trade prep, and students can attend the school that best meets their needs. Most districts cannot afford the dichotomy, so they tend to emphasize what is appropriate for the neighborhood they serve.

I grew up in a neighborhood that was fairly well to do, so it was natural that our schools were of the college prep type. This, of course, suited my needs perfectly. I cannot say I've ever been in an environment where I didn't think the teachers were bad. Oh, there's the usual odd duck, but overall, the schools I've been in have had very good teachers. Of course, that's a deep, retrospective view. High Shool was many moons ago.

The protective system you speak of is tenure, and is an essential part of the retention process. We don't pay teachers enough, so we offer them protection. Without it, some districts would not be able to retain the good teachers that they have.

My sister has taught High School math for quite a few years now. Originally, she taught in San Francisco, but she's been teaching for a number of years now in the same district we grew up in. She teaches the higher level math courses, so most of her students are fairly motivated. Even though she is tenured, she has to meet her districts requirements for continuing education.

Here in the U.S., most trades are taught after completion of High School. Both my wife and my brother in law took trade coursework instead of general college work. Both courses were under two years and gave them everything they needed for their chosen field. My wife chose her field well (medical assistant) and will always be able to find work. My BIL has apparently chosen less well, as electronic technicians are becoming less in demand. Unfortunately, our society tends to replace electronics rather than fix them. My nephew also went to trade school. I suspect he picked a field that will always be in demand, aircraft mechanic.

That said, I don't feel like any of our secondary schools let us down. It seems we were all able to get where we wanted to go.

Aldor88
11-19-2007, 12:23 PM
Sorry for taking this even more offtopic but i was wondering. Are High-schools and Collages free in the US? Here in Finland they are and most ppl take it for granted, all tho i think were quite lucky. We do pay for books tho but that's hardy comparable to paying your whole study.
And it's not like we have bad teacher's(there are some ofc, but that goes for any profession) either, actually i think Finland scored among highest in the last PISA edjucation study.
It might have something to do with the seize of the schools here tho. lets face it, theres three times as many ppl living in the area around LA than there is in the whole of Finland ;). When theres less students the teachers can concentrate more on individuals and improve their preformance and support those that struggle.

We should really make a new topic for this as we kind of crashed this one :rolleyes:.

TNB
11-19-2007, 12:26 PM
In part, it depends on the school system.
Actually, it probably depends on the "elective" school program unless a foreign language is now required of a vocational school program or is actually mandated like "english" in most schools. Of course, with the "no student left behind program" that also doesn't mean that students are "actually" learning English instead of just passing by or being passed--I've encountered a few of those as well.

The majority of the public school system in the USA is a mess, and a large reason for it (albeit very unpopular, don't flame me please!) is that public school teachers are way too job-protected here.
Then there are those who automatically get raises based on the number of years in the system instead of actually being "awarded" a raise based on merit. The standard 180 day school system doesn't help either if a student forgets everything in between and the teacher only goes into teaching for the time off. Of course, there are still breaks between "tracks" even if a school may be in session for 12 months.

TNB, I think you are not very fair to your fellas Americans. I met a few Americans in my life and many of them spoke almost fluent Spanish (to my great susprise), fewer of them used French.

Considering how many Spanish speaking people live in California compared to countries like Spain, that is really not surprising depending on the person's place of residence and employment--of course, speaking a foreign language is also not the same as writing and/or the study of a foreign culture.

I took one Spanish class in middle school, but many of the parents raised a stink about learning something besides English. I also took Spanish and French in high school, but that was because I was in a college prep program, not because it was mandatory. In college I took Spanish and Russian, but that was also because of my major, not because it was a college requirement. In other words, a foreign language was NOT required when I went to school, college, or otherwise. Something also very different from some countries who start teaching English as a foreign language in the 6th grade and have a 12-month system.

One individual also comes to mind who I met years ago from the Ukraine--he spoke seven languages. Ironically, some of the well-educated Americans also gave him a difficult time about his English speaking skills though there only language skills consisted of English. Hence, my original comment and/or joke that I heard told by numerous people from around the world--mostly, from South America.


Sorry for taking this even more offtopic but i was wondering. Are High-schools and Collages free in the US?
If you don't consider paying taxes, there are public funded high schools. However, the people with money (and some without) send their children to private schools since they probably have a better overall standing. There has also been a stink raised in the USA about a "voucher" program and "home schooling". Basically, some people don't want to send their children to public schools and want some sort of reimbursement if they don't send them to public schools.

AdamW
11-19-2007, 01:15 PM
Well, I'm a product of the public education system in the US, so I have expertise as a student. My kids both went throgh the public school system, so I have expertise as a parent. And I've been a teacher in public high schools for 13 years, so I have expertise as an educator.

I could of course post a very long treatise here, but that'd be innapropriate. Instead, I just want to add three comments.

1. I'm always bemused by the people who have no real expertise or recent experience with the educational system and still think they know what's wrong with the system and how to fix it.

2. Those people should spend several hours observing in public school classrooms.

3. For those who decry the "job protection" of teachers, take a little time to familiarize yourself with the history of organized labor in this country.

Now I'll step down from my soapbox!

DonSchap
11-19-2007, 01:27 PM
So, there I was, back in October of 1985, sitting on a park bench, minding my own business, when this rather diminutive person (less than 3 feet tall) walks up, hands me a smokin’ new Minolta Maxxum 7000 with an AF 2800 flash unit sitting in the hot shoe and says, in a really stranging sound little munchkin–like voice, “Here. Mister … take my picture … and it’s all yours.”

So, with a wry smile, because I don’t want to burst out laughing, I turn the camera and flash on, raise the entire rig to my eye and “poof”, the dude is like gone! No where to be seen. Yeah, I missed the shot, too. I swore to myself, "Next time I use a faster shutter speed." I even took a look under the bench, to see if he was hiding there. Nope ... just vanished. So, there I sit, holding a brand new camera from Minolta, loaded with ASA-400 color film and the rest … it be history.

Okay, perhaps that is pushing the story a little far … but, what the hey? Things get a little foggy trying to remember back 22 years. It’s still some kind of history, I just have a "short" memory of it.

Hope that gets this thread back on track. ;)

herc182
11-19-2007, 01:30 PM
my god. What happened here?

Lets not try and resolve the schooling problems of the USA and maybe just be content that we can set our aperture correctly and occasionally get the right exposure.

:D

herc182
11-19-2007, 01:31 PM
So, there I was, back in October of 1985, sitting on a park bench, minding my own business, when this rather diminutive person (less than 3 feet tall) walks up, hands me a smokin’ new Minolta Maxxum 7000 with an AF 2800 flash unit sitting in the hot shoe and says, in a really stranging sound little munchkin–like voice, “Here. Mister … take my picture … and it’s all yours.”

So, with a wry smile, because I don’t want to burst out laughing, I turn the camera and flash on, raise the entire rig to my eye and “poof”, the dude is like gone! No where to be seen. Yeah, I missed the shot, too. I swore to myself, "Next time I use a faster shutter speed." I even took a look under the bench, to see if he was hiding there. Nope ... just vanished. So, there I sit, holding a brand new camera from Minolta, loaded with ASA-400 color film and the rest … it be history.


It was me! how do you not remember?

Gintaras
11-19-2007, 01:44 PM
Adam, the freedom of speech is cornerstone of democratic society, so is a freedom to express opinions to which one is free agree or disagree. Anyway, it looks like we must create a separate thread for education topic as this forum spins off its trails.

TNB, you learnt Russian? Cool. Guess what is my mother language, this is Russian! So we can use this sometimes and make others understand nothing. :p

Now back to photography. May be I need mention an inspiring and relaxing feel which inspired me. I find this amazing how much I love this and how quickly I can forget all the work stress. Concerning gear, right, anyone wishing have the whole line up if money not the issue. Having family limits your appetite as kids and wife want their toys too.:rolleyes:

fionndruinne
11-19-2007, 03:24 PM
I admit I am not the most knowledgeable when it comes to the American public schooling system, but I do believe the USA runs by means of competition, and that should extend to the public education system to a greater extent than it does. Better pay for teachers combined with less job protection, I think, would greatly improve the situation. But enough on that.


cant believe it. So far there has been no mention of lion taming, chiropody or lingerie designing.

Ah well, guess nikonians are fairly ordinary people then.

Well (and this touches on languages also), I am teaching myself Latin, as well as inventing my own Indo-European language.:p

herc182
06-27-2008, 02:10 AM
was just reading over this and thought it might interest some of you again!

anco85
06-27-2008, 03:24 AM
I can't even remember if I've posted in here or not. Oh well, here we go again :D

I never saw the point in photography, after all, I remembered moments with brain power, not photos. I got an Tedelex SLR years ago as a Christmas gift and I probably shot with it a couple dozen times.

A few hundred years went by and I never really got back into it. Instead, my passion for performance motor vehicles grew stronger.

I local chap set up a social website (www.namlish.com) where he ran a monthly feature on the cars in and around our town.

I read the articles for 2 or 3 years before deciding it's a bunch of crap and that a no-brained, one armed monkey good write better articles.

I contacted the owner of the website and he said I'm more than welcome to send him a few articles and we can see if I have what it takes.

I started writing articles for "car of the month" (bear in mind, my photog skills back then sucked) and took snap shots with an old 3.2 mp Sony Cybershot.

I really started thinking about focus points, composition, location etc and that was it. I was hooked.

A few months down the line my parents bought my a Canon S3is and my social life was over. The camera went everywhere I went.

instead of playing pool in a club, I started taking pictures of the people playing pool in said club, it was so much more rewarding.

The owner of Namlish then approached me again to ask if I'd be willing to cover events and concerts as well and I just couldn't refuse(the 350d and 400d did help make up my mind :D )

So yeah, 2 years down the line, I own a D80, work as a freelance photographer for the largest performance magazine in Africa and events coverage for the largest social scene website in Namibia.

And to think, I'm but a lowly 23 year old IT administrator :D

e_dawg
06-27-2008, 08:17 AM
I was always kind of into photography, but it really picked up last summer after i broke up with my ex girlfriend. I was depressed and needed something to keep my mind off things. Photography helped get me through the tough times.

herc182
06-27-2008, 08:23 AM
I was always kind of into photography, but it really picked up last summer after i broke up with my ex girlfriend. I was depressed and needed something to keep my mind off things. Photography helped get me through the tough times.

I hear you...unfortunately I bought my DSLR when i started seeing someone! So every time i used the camera i thought of her!

Camerajunkie
06-27-2008, 09:47 AM
I know I didn't post in this thread originally.

My interest in photography came from being rabid about pictures. I love old pictures and looking through them. I also never saw a snapshot of me as a baby until after I was married. I also really felt something was missing because I didn't know what I looked like (outside of a few professional pictures) as a baby.

When I had kids, I vowed that they would have pictures of themselves. I bought a Canon T50 off of eBay and started with that. Then I started selling on eBay and a Kodak 2.1 MP camera for dirt cheap so I didn't have to spend so much money developing film and scanning pictures for my eBay biz.

Then I had 2 kids and realized the T50 and it's lack of auto-focus was causing me to miss many pictures. When my H skipped V-day one year, I bought myself a Nikon N65 for Easter. Honestly it was my glorified point and shoot. I had no CLUE what I was doing with it.

Since then I've had 2 more kids and they've all gotten older. I realized I wanted to take more pictures but I didn't want to spend that much money on developing while I learned. I'd resisted going digital because I love film. Fortunately it became a matter of economics for me.

Bought the Nikon D50 and ended up here. I gave my N65 to my BIL who likes cameras and is dirt poor. I wasn't using it at all and my oldest is not old enough for a camera like that. I keep thinking of getting her a nice p&s digital though.

What I do in real life.... I've been a SAHM to my kids since my oldest was born. I got a part time job a couple of years ago in a department store and about 10 months ago was hired by my H's job in a full-time position. We both work based from home and pretty much get to set our hours to whatever we want them to be. As long as we get the work done, they don't care what time of day we do it. It works great with young kids. (I do title searches on properties for a law firm.)

I'd like to start a photo business but I want to practice my photography a lot more first.

rawpaw18
06-27-2008, 08:59 PM
It was all about the kids playing sports, tried capturing them with a Hp 812(look it up if you want a chuckle). That did not work very well, then at a game some soccer mom whipped out her Canon DSLR and I thought,
yeah baby!

Picked up the D50 and went from there. I actually am old for the forum it seems at 41. I am self employeed hanging wallpaper for the past 15 years.

XaiLo
06-27-2008, 09:12 PM
I actually am old for the forum it seems at 41. I am self employeed hanging wallpaper for the past 15 years.


Ah, you youngsters, I have playboy magazines that old :p nice to know I'm not alone rawpaw18. ;)

DonSchap
06-27-2008, 09:26 PM
"You kids!" he exclaimed, as he looked at his battle-scared Maxxum 7000, "lucky are you to not have to struggle with balancing the high cost of film work against a dismal income."

I've had a number of careers in my lifetime ... not as many as some, but then again, I'm not CEO of Hewlett-Packard, either. Like many others on here, I am currently an IT-jockey ... expanding from my electronics heritage in the US Navy. IT was a hobby for me, originally ... so why not try and make a buck at it, too, I figure. Unfortunately, training is a nightmare to maintain in the IT world. My last employer did darn little to keep me current.

I have turned my passions back to photography, which turns out to be a lot faster than trying to draw everything. Digital photography, with software ... allows for a faster base image and then you can pile your "art" right on top of it.

I have been doing the photography-thing since I was twelve, developing and printing my own stuff since I was thirteen ... so that calculates to darn near 40 years worth of imaging. Lots of fun ... and more to come. :D

K1W1
06-27-2008, 11:37 PM
"You kids!" he exclaimed, as he looked at his battle-scared Maxxum 7000,

Child. :)

My first camera

http://a2.vox.com/6a00d4142cc6213c7f00cd972382c24cd5-500pi

(and they were a current model at the time)

ColColt
06-28-2008, 08:58 AM
Such little ones...my first one.

http://i180.photobucket.com/albums/x220/ColColt/My%20Stuff/OldKokak620.jpg

kjmdrumz3
06-28-2008, 02:15 PM
I am a Communications Technician onboard the E-3 Sentry (AWACS) in the United States Air Force. I got into photography when I was 14-ish. I bought a Ricoh 35mm camera. Never did much with it. Ended up selling it to a relative. About a year ago, my father-in-law got a D80 and I instantly fell in love. I was always drawn to photography, but never seemed to have the time. I just loved the image quality he was getting. So I ended up getting a D40 but oops, Circuit City accidentally gave me a D40x for the same price :D

bgrablin
06-28-2008, 03:43 PM
I am a Communications Technician onboard the E-3 Sentry (AWACS) in the United States Air Force. I got into photography when I was 14-ish. I bought a Ricoh 35mm camera. Never did much with it. Ended up selling it to a relative. About a year ago, my father-in-law got a D80 and I instantly fell in love. I was always drawn to photography, but never seemed to have the time. I just loved the image quality he was getting. So I ended up getting a D40 but oops, Circuit City accidentally gave me a D40x for the same price :D

AWACS, big flying saucer in the sky. :)

I am well below the coordinating altitude so I don't get to work with you guys too much. Must be nice to be flying around while being able to get up and use the bathroom/grab some coffee/BS/etc. :)

kjmdrumz3
06-28-2008, 05:36 PM
AWACS, big flying saucer in the sky. :)

I am well below the coordinating altitude so I don't get to work with you guys too much. Must be nice to be flying around while being able to get up and use the bathroom/grab some coffee/BS/etc. :)

Sure is ;) And to make it even better-I preflight and postflight the aircraft comm systems. I don't do anything in-flight unless something breaks :cool:
Where are you stationed at? I'm at Tinker...yay!

DonSchap
06-28-2008, 08:47 PM
Well, whatever you do ... make sure you get some ground time and see something. Even if you have to take leave ... you can always go home ... but, trips overseas are usually few and far between after the age of 30.

I haven't been off of North America since 1985. Not complaining ... I made good use of my "ground time." Just wish I would have had a digital and some of these superior lenses, back then.

Good luck and thanks for your personal contribution to national defence. Have camera, will travel.

kjmdrumz3
06-28-2008, 10:31 PM
Well, whatever you do ... make sure you get some ground time and see something. Even if you have to take leave ... you can always go home ... but, trips overseas are usually few and far between after the age of 30.

I haven't been off of North America since 1985. Not complaining ... I made good use of my "ground time." Just wish I would have had a digital and some of these superior lenses, back then.

Good luck and thanks for your personal contribution to national defence. Have camera, will travel.

Which is actually one reason I bought the camera. If I'm gonna see the world, I want some really good pictures to remember it by.

Camerajunkie
06-29-2008, 04:49 PM
I can pull out old cameras and claim they were my first too. I found several old cameras in my great-aunt's house when we cleaned it out. (Ie 1910-1920 era cameras.) Too cool!

lorilu
07-01-2008, 10:29 PM
Thanks for the nice support of teachers in public schools! As a 25+ year veteran, dealing with No Child Left Behind, and a majority of parents that can't be bothered to raise the children they brought into the world, I am very proud of the job I do every day. I earned my tenure, and I deserve it. If you paid me commensurately with an MBA, think what your taxes would be. My M.Ed SHOULD be worth every bit as much.

Benjamin2007
07-03-2008, 11:23 AM
Interesting thread, a bit like the "Introduce Yourself..." thread in the General Digital Photography Chat area.

I only took up digital photography in October 2007, I wanted to take photo's of the kitten I'd adopted and hand-reared from 1 week old.

I borrowed a Ricoh Caplio GX in mid-Sept07, had two days to play with it before I had to return it, and was hooked. I was soooo excited to just hold a camera in my hands again and to be able to take photos whenever I wanted, especially of Ariella, my cat! After that I spent several weeks researching digicams, decided I wanted an ultra-zoom instead of an ultra-compact/compact camera, and short-listed the Fujis, but due to budget constraints at the time, bought the S700/S5700 instead of the S6000fd/S6500fd or S9100/S9600.

I've been really happy with the Fuji, but feel its time to move on and take the step to a dSLR. The advantages in IQ & ability to control DoF apart from anything else are highly desirable! I've spent several months researching dSLR bodies (Canon, Nikon & Pentax) & lenses, and have decided to buy the D80+50/1.8 (lenses to add include Tamron 17-50/2.8, Tamron 90 Macro, Tokina 12-24/f4 (or perhaps the Tokina 11-16/2.8) & the Nikkor 70-300VR, probably in that order). I don't want to wait for the D90, nor will I be able to afford it probably when it is released.

My interest in photography began in high-school. I went to a Selective Public School, where it was mandatory to study 6mnths each of Latin, German, French & Indonesian, which were all the languages offered by the school at the time. After the mandatory 2yrs of language studies, I took German for the next four years (I had wanted to study Latin, but no-one else wanted to, so I would've had to do it by correspondence). I took the photography elective at school, bought a Hanimex M35 (40mm fixed lens) 35mm film camera & learnt the basics of exposure on it. Unfortunately I appear to have got bored with it and didn't do any photography for several years, until I took another short course in 35mm film photography as part of an Education Technology subject within a Grad Dip Ed in 1990. I used a Pentax K1000 on the course (others used the Canon AE-1) and it was a great camera, built like a tank and very simple to use. I also enjoyed developing the resulting B&W film photos. Next camera was another cheap 35mm film camera, a P&S Canon, which I used while on a study-tour in Israel in 2002/3.

What do I do for a living?
Currently I work in finance administration for a Medical Research Centre for an Australian University. I have worked in the past as a law clerk, steal-worker, fruit-picker, & served in the Aust. Army Reserve -Infantry, (which were all student p/t or holiday f/t jobs). Full-time I've worked as a teacher, tutor, university researcher & computer project officer (for the Australian Navy) amongst other things. I also volunteer on my body corporate, as a Union workplace delegate, established & co-ordinate my synagogue's library, sing in the synagogue choir, study Torah, (I speak, read &/or write English, German & Hebrew, although my German is very rusty now through lack of use), loved motorcycling (when I had a 'bike, a Suzuki GS500E) & enjoyed parachuting (only one jump though, just didn't get around to doing it again), and thanks to TCadwell could well be building a boat in my retirement .... (you bastard! ;).... lol :), since I visited the Glenl website I've become obsessed with the idea of building a Biscayne 18')...

cheers,

TNB
07-03-2008, 01:52 PM
Thanks for the nice support of teachers in public schools! As a 25+ year veteran, dealing with No Child Left Behind, and a majority of parents that can't be bothered to raise the children they brought into the world, I am very proud of the job I do every day. I earned my tenure, and I deserve it. If you paid me commensurately with an MBA, think what your taxes would be. My M.Ed SHOULD be worth every bit as much.
Unless things have changed locally, teachers do get pay increases as their education level increases as well as increases per number of years in service. Of course I've encountered numerous people over time with an MBA who are under-employed and thereby under-paid as well. The same with Ph.Ds.

I also . . . study Torah, (I speak . . . Hebrew, loved motorcycling (when I had a 'bike, a Suzuki GS500E) & enjoyed parachuting
I considered learning Hebrew since I was working around a few people fluent in Hebrew. I also used to do the motorcycling (dirt bikes) and parachuting (military). And hopefully, I'll be switching positions thereby earning more bucks, which will probably bring another motorcycle (new Harley) into my life.

Benjamin2007
07-04-2008, 02:08 AM
I considered learning Hebrew since I was working around a few people fluent in Hebrew. I also used to do the motorcycling (dirt bikes) and parachuting (military). And hopefully, I'll be switching positions thereby earning more bucks, which will probably bring another motorcycle (new Harley) into my life.

TNB its interesting how many photographers here have had similar experiences, eg motorcycling, military service, &/or parachuting etc., although I suppose in any largish sample of any specific population you will find some similarities.
I'm also looking for promotion opportunities, but before I can spend the gains I'll have to reduce debt (mortgage & personal loan) first, then I think photography may have priority before another motorcycle, but that would certainly be a lot of fun! (I like medium sized, sports/touring, unfaired (sp?) or naked, "cafe-racer" type bikes, I'm not interested in off-road, race-replicas or cruisers, re brands I like Honda, Suzuki, Ducati & Triumph, sorry K1W1 cann't say that I'm that interested in BM's). Enjoy the Harley when it comes along! :D:cool:

bgrablin
07-04-2008, 04:48 AM
... but, trips overseas are usually few and far between after the age of 30.

I haven't been off of North America since 1985. Not complaining ... I made good use of my "ground time." Just wish I would have had a digital and some of these superior lenses, back then.

Good luck and thanks for your personal contribution to national defence. Have camera, will travel.

This is the primary reason for me getting into photography. I did strictly video last time, came out with some pretty sweet movies, but I wanted to do still photography this time.

"Ground Time"... Not so much. With IEDs as bad as they are, I would rather take the photos from the air. If I need to get a shot from the ground, I can clear the ground first. But recently Iraqis have been trying to target the aircraft, so ground photo ops have been pulled to a halt.


Sure is ;) And to make it even better-I preflight and postflight the aircraft comm systems. I don't do anything in-flight unless something breaks :cool:
Where are you stationed at? I'm at Tinker...yay!

I'm in Kirkuk, Iraq. FOB Warrior to be exact.

K1W1
07-04-2008, 05:36 AM
I like Honda, Suzuki, Ducati & Triumph, sorry K1W1 cann't say that I'm that interested in BM's).

Our stable is 2 x Suzukis here in Australia, 1 x 1 owner 1978 Suzuki at my Mums place in NZ and 1 x Ducati here in Australia. Our BM's have 4 wheels and they are only ours when they need a wash or I get a phone call to say our car has a puncture down the road and can I come and change the wheel. :)

One thing that constantly surprises me is the number of people who have no interest in photography until they have a child or obtain a pet. I'm not sure what the similarity between the two is but both those things crops up all the time in threads.

XaiLo
07-04-2008, 08:35 AM
One thing that constantly surprises me is the number of people who have no interest in photography until they have a child or obtain a pet. I'm not sure what the similarity between the two is but both those things crops up all the time in threads.

Quite a few people consider their pets as children or family members. Maybe it is an unconcious attempt to record fleeting moments in life. Undoubtedly as most of us mature the realization that nothing on earth remains the same begins to sink in and the older you get time seems to accelerate beyond reason, years in reflection appear as though they were only minutes. Well, that's my deep thought of the day :p

Benjamin2007
07-06-2008, 07:21 AM
Our stable is 2 x Suzukis here in Australia, 1 x 1 owner 1978 Suzuki at my Mums place in NZ and 1 x Ducati here in Australia. Our BM's have 4 wheels and they are only ours when they need a wash or I get a phone call to say our car has a puncture down the road and can I come and change the wheel. :)

You've got good taste K1W1, so who rides what & what models are they? :)
Apologies about the mistaken assumption that you rode a BMW, I thought you posted a picture of what looked like an R series engine close-up a little while ago (must've been something else) and assumed it was a picture of your bike....:o


One thing that constantly surprises me is the number of people who have no interest in photography until they have a child or obtain a pet. I'm not sure what the similarity between the two is but both those things crops up all the time in threads.

While its true that many people take up photography to preserve memories of children & pets, I first became interested in photography as a teenager, I just didn't maintain that interest consistently from then to now. :o I had always intended to replace my last film camera when it died in 2003 :( with a digicam :), but hadn't got around to doing the necessary research into digital cameras :confused:, before the kitten came along, to make an informed decision. The cat was the tipping point, the incentive to do the research and buy the camera :D, but my interest in photography runs much deeper than just taking memory preserving pet snap-shots, hopefully over time with further study & practice my photographic skills will improve and my subject matter will diversify.... time will tell...:cool:

cheers,