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View Full Version : Advice needed on under $1000 camera choice.



DDDave
08-03-2004, 09:57 AM
Hi there,

I've next to no experiance of higher end dig cams, so would really appreciate any advice in choosing a camera.

The camera is for work, to take close up (like e-bay presentation style) photos of our products. These photos will be used for product brochures, as well as been sent to printers to make large display panels for our stand at trade shows, and so need to be good quality.

I've had a look around and quite like the sound of the Olympus C-8080, as this seems to have a good image quality, as well as been in the under $1000 range of my budget.

Is this a good choice, or is it overkill and there are others more suitable for the job...????

D70FAN
08-03-2004, 12:04 PM
Hi there,

I've next to no experiance of higher end dig cams, so would really appreciate any advice in choosing a camera.

The camera is for work, to take close up (like e-bay presentation style) photos of our products. These photos will be used for product brochures, as well as been sent to printers to make large display panels for our stand at trade shows, and so need to be good quality.

I've had a look around and quite like the sound of the Olympus C-8080, as this seems to have a good image quality, as well as been in the under $1000 range of my budget.

Is this a good choice, or is it overkill and there are others more suitable for the job...????

Large trade show display panels are not a consumer digital camera strong point, it depends on the image quality you expect for the large panels and how large you are talking about. However, macro capability definately is a consumer digital camera strong point.

If image quality is not critical for the large panels then the C8080 might work. But consider that the final print at 24 x 36 will be less than 100dpi. Larger panels will, of course, be even less. Again, since these are probably not art prints this may be acceptable.

I think you need to shoot a few pictures, at the camera store, with an 8080 first and then convert the images to panel size, to see if it works for you.

Also remember that you will be dealing with a little more noise from an 8MP consumer camera, and that will be amplified as the picture is enlarged. There is low cost software, such as Noise Ninja, which will help reduce the noise in most cases.

A Pro-sumer dSLR, like the Canon 300D or Nikon D70, will give you cleaner pictures but the end result, at poster size, may be a wash, and a good Pro camera, like the Canon 1Ds may be out of your practical price range.

But, you might want to try some sample shots with the 300D and the D70 as well. Macro shots will be a little trickier, but can be done. With any of the cameras mentioned you should use a mini-tripod for your close-up work.

This is definately a case of try before you buy, due to your special large format printing requirements. It doesn't cost much to buy a couple of memory cards, then go to your favorite camera store, bring a couple of test items, then shoot and large format print from a few different cameras.

You might want to pre-arrange the trip to the photo store so they don't go crazy trying to figure out what you are up to.

Once you have the cameras figured out, you will have to look at lighting, which can have a greater affect on your pictures than anything else. If the camera you choose can take a good picture in crappy lighting, then it will amaze you with the right lighting.

Most important, let us know how this turns out. ;)

jamison55
08-04-2004, 08:05 AM
I agree with George. You may want to also add a software package called "Genuine Fractals" to your budget. It allows you to resize digital images using a smart interpolation technique. It is what most pro's use for making large prints of their digital shots. It will run you $160 here: http://www.digitalriver.com/dr/v2/ec_MAIN.Entry10?V1=641632&PN=1&SP=10023&xid=15628&CID=0&DSP=&CUR=840&PGRP=0&CACHE_ID=0