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albn
09-30-2007, 07:57 AM
I am new to these forums, and if this is in the wrong place, please forgive me.

The problem I am facing is most likely operator error because I am also new to digital cameras. Anyway, my wife has some handmade jewelry, and of course, detail and clarity are important. So I set my camera to macro with the default settings (I do not know what the other settings are because it looks too complicated). On the viewfinder they look alright, but when I place it in Photoshop to crop and spruce up, they look really fuzzy and just plain bad.

I tried other settings with no success.

Any ideas on how to reduce the fuzziness? The camera I have is a Panasonic DMC-FX-12.

Thanks.

D Thompson
09-30-2007, 08:02 AM
Can you post an example and the shot settings as far as aperture, shutter speed, and ISO? It will help diagnose the problem.

albn
09-30-2007, 08:06 AM
Can you post an example and the shot settings as far as aperture, shutter speed, and ISO? It will help diagnose the problem.

I can post a picture for you. It will take a few moments.

Aperture, shutter speed, ISO, what? That is all Greek to me. :( So there is more to this stuff than just point and shoot? Let me check the instruction manual again for these terms.

Sorry for the ignorance.

Edit: Here is a link to an example: http://dprkforum.com/necklace.jpg

Let's see if I got the terms right. I cannot seem to find the ISO, shutter speed or the aperture. I see W.Balance, sensitivty, aspect ratio, picture size, quality,af mode, burst, af assist lamp, d zoom and color mode.

D Thompson
09-30-2007, 08:40 AM
No problem. I pulled the settings from the exif data of the shot you posted. It appears it was shot at ISO100, 1/30th (shutter speed) @ f2.8 (aperture). I'm not familiar with your camera, but since you are shooting macro there are a few things you need to do.

1/30th shutter speed - if you are hand holding this is probably where you're getting a slight blur. Since you are shooting macro and have the camera close to the subject (also check your minimum focusing distance for the camera) any movement at all will be captured. If you're shooting something at a distance, you could probably get by with 1/30th and not notice it. Try upping your shutter speed to 1/100 or faster or use a tripod. Even handheld and using flash, which it appears you did, you are gonna get a little ghosting @ 1/30th due to ambient light.

Hope this helps a little.

albn
09-30-2007, 08:45 AM
No problem. I pulled the settings from the exif data of the shot you posted. It appears it was shot at ISO100, 1/30th (shutter speed) @ f2.8 (aperture). I'm not familiar with your camera, but since you are shooting macro there are a few things you need to do.

1/30th shutter speed - if you are hand holding this is probably where you're getting a slight blur. Since you are shooting macro and have the camera close to the subject (also check your minimum focusing distance for the camera) any movement at all will be captured. If you're shooting something at a distance, you could probably get by with 1/30th and not notice it. Try upping your shutter speed to 1/100 or faster or use a tripod. Even handheld and using flash, which it appears you did, you are gonna get a little ghosting @ 1/30th due to ambient light.

Hope this helps a little.

I'll see if I can find the settings to change it. I did not realize it can be this much of a pain to take a picture, heh.

I'll see if your suggestions help.

griptape
09-30-2007, 08:58 AM
Also, if you're going to use a tripod, you can avoid using the flash. You tend to lose some detail when the flash blows out your highlights (makes things look white when they should actually be a color other than white). And don't forget to use your timer (10 second, 3 second, whatever it may be) for the tripod, because from the time you press the shutter button to the time you get your hand off the camera and the tripod steadies can still cause blur. But to give you hope, compact cameras really can take very decent macro pictures using the right settings:

http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m235/nothingisworking/Turtle.jpg

Camera Make: Canon
Camera Model: Canon PowerShot SD550
Image Date: 2007:09:29 10:36:39
Flash Used: No (Auto)
Focal Length: 7.7mm
ISO: 200
CCD Width: 1.80mm
Exposure Time: 0.020 s (1/50)
Aperture: f/2.8
White Balance: Auto
Metering Mode: Matrix

Bynx
09-30-2007, 12:11 PM
This is an example of macro f5 at 1/60 sec. ISO 200. Camera was on tripod and only light was small fluorescent fixture. There is lots of depth of field. In fact, a lot more than you should need. And the detail is sharp and clear.

sla
10-01-2007, 03:42 AM
In maximum short:
- bring a lot of light ;)
- don't use flash lamp, so that you would be able to control lighting.
- set low ISO value manually (64, 80 or 100)
- put your camera on something solid to avoid camera shake (it is not necesseary to use tripod, but tripod is recommended)
- try to use camera's "delay" timer, because when you press shutter button, you may shake the camera.

regards
s.