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Shaft
08-20-2007, 12:53 PM
how do you succesfully take a picture of something that is very light? For instance if i were to take a picture of a beach with the sun in the picture, everything will become dark, except for the sun. same with taking pictures of a candle for example, the surroundings won't be visible, while all i can see is the fire. And ideas?

griptape
08-20-2007, 12:58 PM
Use your flash.

JLV
08-20-2007, 01:05 PM
Use spot metering and meter on a mid tone.

Shaft
08-20-2007, 01:12 PM
Use spot metering and meter on a amid tone.

and..how do you do that? I'm not that experienced in DSLR cameras, could you explain it step by step? I'd appreciate it a lot

No Control
08-20-2007, 01:40 PM
Shaft,

I think the easiest way for you to take pictures on a beach and have them properly exposed is to use exposure compensation. The problem you're having is that your camera's meter [the thing that sets the exposure] is seeing the sun and going "wow! that's really bright!" and setting an exposure value that's wrong for the rest of your image. but by using exposure compensation, usually a +/- button on your camera, you can tell the camera to make the image lighter or darker. Try setting +1 stop exposure compensation and see how that works for you.

JLV
08-20-2007, 05:12 PM
and..how do you do that? I'm not that experienced in DSLR cameras, could you explain it step by step? I'd appreciate it a lot

Since you have a DSLR you must have manual mode. In one of your menus you should be able to change metering to spot. While in one of the automatic modes put the spot on a mid tone. Note the F stop and shutter speed. Go to manual mode, and use these settings.

JLV
08-21-2007, 12:32 PM
I should add a technique we used a lot in the days when cameras were completely manual. When the subject is back lighted, we used our light meter to get a reading from our hand, a gray card could also be used. I see no reason that you cannot aim the lens at your hand and take the readings with your camera as I referred to in my other postings.

Shaft
08-21-2007, 06:40 PM
I see...i already knew about the +/- button but that didn't work very well :(
But thank you very much for your answers!

Bynx
08-21-2007, 07:16 PM
Nice rule of thumb is to shoot with sun at your back. Next time youre by a river running east and west around 10 oclock shoot west and then shoot east. Like two different places the colors are so different.

Turn
08-21-2007, 07:32 PM
its best to use manual shutterspeed.

and/or get a grad filter which is dark at the top and light at the bottom

SpecialK
08-21-2007, 10:00 PM
 get a reading from our hand, a gray card could also be used. I see no reason that you cannot aim the lens at your hand and take the readings with your camera as I referred to in my other postings.


If you meter your palm you should over expose a stop (+1 compensation) regardless of your skin color as most palms are the same. Or, meter blue sky pointing away from the sun - correct reading as-is.

colemck
08-24-2007, 10:19 PM
i just bought the s5is and while i have been playing with it alot, i haven't been able to take very many artsy shots. I tried the macro a little and liked that, but I've mainly taken some candids and some very bad action shots at gymnastics. I really wanted an slr, since I was used to a film slr, but didn't want to spend quite that. I guess I'll just keep trying at the gym, but it sure makes it hard when you can't use a flash. Maybe I should get that slr anyway. Just hated to splurge when the s5 will do everything else I would want for $400 as opposed to $800 or more as I would need a zoom lens for the sports shots.

Sorry to invade on this thread when I'm not answering the original post, but I saw your gallery from here and enjoyed it. Thanks for sharing.