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JPLUM
07-31-2004, 06:19 AM
I am having a problem getting the colors shown on my NEC Multisync 97f monitor to match what prints on my Epson 1280 printer. My camera is a Sony F-828 and I use Photoshop Elements to edit. Which of these needs to be tweaked? Thanks.

John_Reed
07-31-2004, 06:33 AM
I am having a problem getting the colors shown on my NEC Multisync 97f monitor to match what prints on my Epson 1280 printer. My camera is a Sony F-828 and I use Photoshop Elements to edit. Which of these needs to be tweaked? Thanks.
It sounds like you need to color-calibrate your monitor, and create a color profile for your printer, so that the monitor and printer will agree on colors. I use a Color Vision (http://www.imagingspectrum.com/cgi-local/SoftCart.exe/icc_color_management.html?E+scstore) system myself, which I see have dropped in price dramatically since I bought mine. Check it out.

Robert Besen
07-31-2004, 12:51 PM
It sounds like you need to color-calibrate your monitor, and create a color profile for your printer, so that the monitor and printer will agree on colors. I use a Color Vision system myself, which I see have dropped in price dramatically since I bought mine. Check it out.

I went to the colorvision site, and it looks like you need a $299 program to profile you monitor. I have colorplus from colorvision, which is about $99 and you can't profile your printer with that. Am I missing something, or do you think $400 is reasonable?

On the other hand, maybe JPLUM can find a profile for his (or her) printer and paper on some site like luminouslandscape.com or computer-darkroom.co.uk.

I'm having trouble finding profiles for my Epson 785EPX. There is a site in Switzerland that I can't remember the name of that will create profiles for you for about $30 each.

Jake Conner
07-31-2004, 02:06 PM
If you're talking about the spyder with printfix, that's not just software, it's also 2 pieces of hardware. And $300 is very reasonable, the same thing a few years ago would have cost thousands.

Jake

JPLUM
07-31-2004, 02:17 PM
Wow - this seems like a lot of money. I think the monitor itself only cost around $260. Does everyone who prints digital pictures get one of these calibrating programs? Are they guarenteed to do the trick?

Jake Conner
07-31-2004, 06:01 PM
No, you dont necessarily NEED a hardware/software calibrating solution... it's just the easiest and most accurate way of doing things. In fact, if you've got a Mac, there's a decent calibrate-by-eye tool built right in to the monitors section of your system preferences, I don't know if Windows has anything similar.

Jake

John_Reed
07-31-2004, 10:27 PM
I went to the colorvision site, and it looks like you need a $299 program to profile you monitor. I have colorplus from colorvision, which is about $99 and you can't profile your printer with that. Am I missing something, or do you think $400 is reasonable?

On the other hand, maybe JPLUM can find a profile for his (or her) printer and paper on some site like luminouslandscape.com or computer-darkroom.co.uk.

I'm having trouble finding profiles for my Epson 785EPX. There is a site in Switzerland that I can't remember the name of that will create profiles for you for about $30 each.
The link I put up showed the "Spyder" with software at $149, the "SpyderPRO" with software at $229. I think that included hardware and software. That's about half what I paid when I bought mine a couple of years back. I got tired of being frustrated about color mis-match, and having the tailored profile fixed my frustration. Your mileage may vary.

Robert Besen
08-01-2004, 09:47 AM
The link I put up showed the "Spyder" with software at $149, the "SpyderPRO" with software at $229. I think that included hardware and software. That's about half what I paid when I bought mine a couple of years back. I got tired of being frustrated about color mis-match, and having the tailored profile fixed my frustration. Your mileage may vary.

But that doesn't create printer profiles, does it? Calibrating the monitor is only half of the equation. Or have you found that using default printer settings works for you?

It's true that the cost of monitor and printer calibration hardware/software products have come down quite a bit in price. It's still fairly steep, though.