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m_a_r
07-07-2007, 07:54 PM
Could someone please explain what white balance is exactly and also the different types of white balance and when I should use each of them?

SpecialK
07-07-2007, 08:17 PM
"White balance" is correction for the color tint caused by different types of light.

Tungsten household lamps are quite yellow/red, while daylight and flash may have a blue tinge.

The WB adjustments on your camera are normally pretty self explanatory. Daylight, cloudy, fluorescent, tungsten, etc.

Vich
07-08-2007, 02:29 AM
Could someone please explain what white balance is exactly and also the different types of white balance and when I should use each of them?

Respectfully; a Google search will be a wealth of information.

In general; it's the color temperature. It ranges from about 2300 to about 15000. A bright sunny day is around 6200.

If you set it wrong, you'll get yellow or red color casts.

Since I think the tiny icons Canon uses on their dial; and their stupid refusal to provide a textual description in the LCD the moment you swith it, I have never strayed from Auto WB and I don't believe my photos are worse off for it (read: they would have been equally messed up if I'd attempted to use a pre-set).

Vich
07-08-2007, 02:31 AM
Could someone please explain what white balance is exactly and also the different types of white balance and when I should use each of them?

Respectfully; a Google search will be a wealth of information.

In general; it's the color temperature. It ranges from about 2300 to about 15000. A bright sunny day is around 6200.

If you set it wrong, you'll get yellow or red color casts.

Since I think the tiny icons Canon uses on their dial; and their stupid refusal to provide a textual description in the LCD the moment you swith it, I have never strayed from Auto WB and I don't believe my photos are worse off for it (read: they would have been equally messed up if I'd attempted to use a pre-set).

Vich
07-08-2007, 02:31 AM
Could someone please explain what white balance is exactly and also the different types of white balance and when I should use each of them?

Respectfully; a Google search will be a wealth of information.

In general; it's the color temperature. It ranges from about 2300 to about 15000. A bright sunny day is around 6200.

If you set it wrong, you'll get yellow or red color casts.

Since I think the tiny icons Canon uses on their dial; and their stupid refusal to provide a textual description in the LCD the moment you swith it, I have never strayed from Auto WB and I don't believe my photos are worse off for it (read: they would have been equally messed up if I'd attempted to use a pre-set).

Vich
07-08-2007, 02:32 AM
Could someone please explain what white balance is exactly and also the different types of white balance and when I should use each of them?

Respectfully; a Google search will be a wealth of information.

In general; it's the color temperature. It ranges from about 2300 to about 15000. A bright sunny day is around 6200.

If you set it wrong, you'll get yellow or red color casts.

Since I think the tiny icons Canon uses on their dial; and their stupid refusal to provide a textual description in the LCD the moment you swith it, I have never strayed from Auto WB and I don`t believe my photos are worse off for it (read: they would have been equally messed up if I'd attempted to use a pre-set).

SpecialK
07-08-2007, 03:48 PM
Since I think the tiny icons Canon uses on their dial; and their stupid refusal to provide a textual description in the LCD the moment you swith it, I have never strayed from Auto WB and I don`t believe my photos are worse off for it (read: they would have been equally messed up if I'd attempted to use a pre-set).

The S3 IS has different icons, with verbage, for different WBs :-)

Rooz
07-09-2007, 02:57 AM
Could someone please explain what white balance is exactly and also the different types of white balance and when I should use each of them?

as others explained it is colour temp.

most WB options are pretty similar in all cams. the picture is pretty self explanatory and indicates when you should use each particular setting. picture of a sun, picture of clouds etc the indoor ones are harder to get right imo. the easiest way to get it right is by taking the same photo of a scene using all your different WB settings and seeing the colour differences for yourself.

coldrain
07-12-2007, 10:53 AM
White is only really white with white light.
And so all other colours are only displayed correctly with white light.
You may have noticed what coloured street lights do for colours... with yellow/amber natrium lights ofr instance, all red cars appear black. You know they are not black... but they look that way anyway.

This of course is an extreme example.

Sunlight is sort of "white". Tungsten (light bulbs) lights usually give a more yellow light (warm). So does candle light, for instance.
Fluorecent (tube) lights give a more blue-ish light (cool).

So... to have subjects appear sort of in their real colour, that is where white balance comes in. Our eyes correct for different light "colours" somewhat... cameras do not have that ability.
So... that is where white balance comes in. It adjusts the colours fo what the sensor receives to put into the photo, making the colours more "correct" according to our eyes.

Now how to use the settings. Preferable is to use the day light setting of your camera when it is sunny outside, using the cloudy when it is cloudy.
Artificial light is harder... the colour temperature of those can vary wildy.
I prefer to use custom white balance in most situations, measuring the white balance on a white piece of paper under the artificial light conditions.
I only use automatic white balance when I do not know what else to use.

And I use "cloudy" with artificial lightning when I do NOT want white to appear white. Adjusting whitebalance can seriously hurt the atmosphere, in bars, restuarants, candle light/fire and what not, when the light determines a lot of the atmosphere.

hokeyguy
07-12-2007, 03:08 PM
Adjusting whitebalance can seriously hurt the atmosphere, in bars, restuarants, candle light/fire and what not, when the light determines a lot of the atmosphere.
This is why I nearly always leave it set to daylight.