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TDT
12-21-2004, 07:43 AM
There are many low light questions here - must be one of the big problems with trying to take pictures. Last night, I decided to try taking some pictures of a snowman I built (mini snowman), and when I set the camera to 1/60 or lower - the light dies out quite easily. I was using my house lights, and that didn't help either.

Still my shots seem blurry, out of focus, and quite a bit of 'orange' in the picture. The only thing I can think of us always using the flash, but sometimes the flash is too bright and I lose so much detail from my photograph.

Hopefully this is enough information to have some help on. I tried to stabilize the camera as much as possible last night, and although my pictures weren't TOO bad, they are still an orange color...is that from the street lamps/house lamps?

John_Reed
12-21-2004, 05:23 PM
There are many low light questions here - must be one of the big problems with trying to take pictures. Last night, I decided to try taking some pictures of a snowman I built (mini snowman), and when I set the camera to 1/60 or lower - the light dies out quite easily. I was using my house lights, and that didn't help either.

Still my shots seem blurry, out of focus, and quite a bit of 'orange' in the picture. The only thing I can think of us always using the flash, but sometimes the flash is too bright and I lose so much detail from my photograph.

Hopefully this is enough information to have some help on. I tried to stabilize the camera as much as possible last night, and although my pictures weren't TOO bad, they are still an orange color...is that from the street lamps/house lamps?...for whatever lighting you're shooting under. I don't know what kind of camera you're using, or if it even allows adjustment of white balance. If it doesn't allow a manual setting, probably a "tungsten" selection would work. Manual selection is best, if available.

TDT
12-21-2004, 05:58 PM
This particular one is a Nikon 5700. I rented it from the lab I work at so I can mess with it, and learn it, prior to getting my camera, which is on Christmas day. I have a lot to learn about photography, but so far as it seems...my night shots are terrible.

John_Reed
12-21-2004, 06:52 PM
This particular one is a Nikon 5700. I rented it from the lab I work at so I can mess with it, and learn it, prior to getting my camera, which is on Christmas day. I have a lot to learn about photography, but so far as it seems...my night shots are terrible.If you're just learning, night shots are one of the hardest things to learn - few people know how to do them perfectly. Try some nice daylight shots, or sunrises, or sunsets, good stuff like that. Go easy to start! :o

ReF
12-21-2004, 08:07 PM
If you want a natural look to your shot and not one with a "flash look,'' then you need to set the camera on something steady like a tripod and use a slow shutter speed. I would turn off the flash and set the shutter speed slow enough to get a good exposure. if your camera doesn't have shutter speed controls, then set it to a night scenery mode. your cam should have that option available. just be sure not to use the night portrait mode, as the flash will normally fire under this option. leaving the white balance in auto will make the shot look more "natural," (and by that I mean the way we normally see it, because there is nothing natural about a street light) but if that isn't what you are going for, then set the white balance to tungsten (the light bulb icon) as suggested above and the snow should look white, not orange.

TDT
12-22-2004, 01:18 PM
Thanks for the help you two,

I have a lot to learn, and John is correct that I'm probably rushing myself too far. This is especially true since I don't even have a manual for the camera I rented (I get my own on Christmas day, so that will be nice - going to read the manual front to back). I got most of the settings learned on this camera...I feel, but once I get the manual I have a feeling there is a lot i don't know.

I just hope, that somehow, I can learn to take better overall photos. I think that eventually, I better get used to a tripod. I currently don't have one, but the lab I work at does and I can rent from there until I buy one. I think that's probably the first thing I need to buy. The balance between exposure and shutter speeds is the only thing that really confuses me now, but I try my best to find a balance between them. I think things will get easier after I read the manual.

For getting better at photos in generally, how do you two suggest I proceed? I mean, for example, should I just go outside and take photos of everything that I could ever think of? Should I try to just work on pictures that will actually mean something to me? Should I just concentrate on daytime photos for now, then try night later? So far my daytime photos are decent - and nighttime or indoor photos can be a little rough unless I use the flash. For some reason the flash works very well, hehe.

Thanks for the opinions, and any future suggestions

D70FAN
12-22-2004, 01:46 PM
Thanks for the help you two,

I have a lot to learn, and John is correct that I'm probably rushing myself too far. This is especially true since I don't even have a manual for the camera I rented (I get my own on Christmas day, so that will be nice - going to read the manual front to back). I got most of the settings learned on this camera...I feel, but once I get the manual I have a feeling there is a lot i don't know.

I just hope, that somehow, I can learn to take better overall photos. I think that eventually, I better get used to a tripod. I currently don't have one, but the lab I work at does and I can rent from there until I buy one. I think that's probably the first thing I need to buy. The balance between exposure and shutter speeds is the only thing that really confuses me now, but I try my best to find a balance between them. I think things will get easier after I read the manual.

For getting better at photos in generally, how do you two suggest I proceed? I mean, for example, should I just go outside and take photos of everything that I could ever think of? Should I try to just work on pictures that will actually mean something to me? Should I just concentrate on daytime photos for now, then try night later? So far my daytime photos are decent - and nighttime or indoor photos can be a little rough unless I use the flash. For some reason the flash works very well, hehe.

Thanks for the opinions, and any future suggestions

Here is a great e-book to get you up-to-speed quickly on Nikon digital cameras. Well worth the investment. I have had the iNova books since the beginning version (3.0), for my 990, and have learned a tremendous amount. The latest version (6.0) includes the CP5700.

http://www.digitalsecrets.net/

I now have a D70, and the iNova e-book on this camera has been a real learning-curve timesaver. Definately worth the $50.

Dave Dilks
12-22-2004, 02:30 PM
Here is a great e-book to get you up-to-speed quickly on Nikon digital cameras. Well worth the investment. I have had the iNova books since the beginning version (3.0), for my 990, and have learned a tremendous amount. The latest version (6.0) includes the CP5700.

http://www.digitalsecrets.net/

I now have a D70, and the iNova e-book on this camera has been a real learning-curve timesaver. Definately worth the $50.

Count me in as another strong advocate of iNova's e-book on the Nikon cameras. Excellent coverage of basic photography, camera operation and enhancement, and post-processing. As George said, it really speeds you along the learning curve.

TDT
12-23-2004, 07:24 AM
Checked out this book. Looks like, along with the book, one also gets a bunch of Photoshop filters as well. This could come in handy.

This is the particular book I'm looking at:
http://www.digitalsecrets.net/secrets/FAQ.html

It doesn't cover the camera I will be getting (Nikon 8700), will that matter much at all?

Thanks

Dave Dilks
12-23-2004, 07:40 AM
Checked out this book. Looks like, along with the book, one also gets a bunch of Photoshop filters as well. This could come in handy.

This is the particular book I'm looking at:
http://www.digitalsecrets.net/secrets/FAQ.html

It doesn't cover the camera I will be getting (Nikon 8700), will that matter much at all?

Thanks

You've got the right book. IMO, it is still worthwhile even if your specific camera model isn't in it - but more worthwhile if it is. You could try e-mailing and see if a new version is imminent that contains the 8700. Or, you could get it now and upgrade to the newer version containing the 8700 when it comes out. When I got my Coolpix 4500 to replace my 950, I was able to get an updated version from them for a nominal cost.

One important note: Most of the filters included with the package at technically Photoshop "Actions", and require the full version of Photoshop (unless Elements has been upgraded to support Actions).

TDT
12-23-2004, 08:21 AM
I have the full version of Adobe Photoshop CS on my mac, and Adobe Photoshop 7 on my PC. I do a lot of 3d and 2d work, and one of my largest reasons for getting this camera in the first place was to take photos of textures and use them in my 3d stuff. For example, taking a close up picture of a rug, and using it as a texture for a floor in a 3d rendering image (of course adding some bump mapping so it looks real).

A side effect of wanting it for just this is I also started to enjoy taking photos of other stuff. Stuff like nature related (trees, flowers, landscape, etc), and enjoy that a lot as well now.

I plan to buy this book hopefully within a month. I'm a college student, and very very strapped with money right now, and hopefully will have a little more soon. Maybe I should e-mail and inquire about a student discount, perhaps the person would be a little nice and help me out on that.