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View Full Version : Stepping Up to Digital SLR



azsooner
12-19-2004, 10:37 AM
Several years ago I retired my 35MM SLR (Minolta X-370) because I was tired of carrying around my gear bag and wanted to go digital. At that time I purchased an Olympus Camedia and have been happy using it for what it is, a decent way to get pictures of the kid to share with the family.

However, recently I have been hearing my SLR calling to me from the closet. I long for the days of taking really nice pictures that you can feel good about. Rather than doing this on my old 35MM I would like to move to a Digital SLR without breaking the bank (not sure if that's possible).

Like most of the posts I've read, I've been driving myself crazy reading internet reviews, viewing sights that post pictures taken with various cameras, and running to stores to feel how the cameras feel in my hand. For me, it has come down to the D70 edging out the DRebel. For no better reason than what the reviews have told me and my opinion of what pictures appear slightly better on the web.

Now to my question: What is a good (doesn’t have to be great) starter package for the D70 that would give me the most flexibility for candid shots, wildlife, and landscapes? Based on the reviews I've read, I would like to stick with Nikkor DX lenses preferably one to start with.

Feel free to correct me or tell me that I need to lean a lot more. I would especially like to hear from a few Cannon bigots as to why the DRebel would be a better decision and what a good starter package would be for that camera.

Thanks,

Jeff

Mike Woods
12-19-2004, 02:20 PM
Several years ago I retired my 35MM SLR (Minolta X-370) because I was tired of carrying around my gear bag and wanted to go digital. At that time I purchased an Olympus Camedia and have been happy using it for what it is, a decent way to get pictures of the kid to share with the family.

However, recently I have been hearing my SLR calling to me from the closet. I long for the days of taking really nice pictures that you can feel good about. Rather than doing this on my old 35MM I would like to move to a Digital SLR without breaking the bank (not sure if that's possible).

Like most of the posts I've read, I've been driving myself crazy reading internet reviews, viewing sights that post pictures taken with various cameras, and running to stores to feel how the cameras feel in my hand. For me, it has come down to the D70 edging out the DRebel. For no better reason than what the reviews have told me and my opinion of what pictures appear slightly better on the web.

Now to my question: What is a good (doesn’t have to be great) starter package for the D70 that would give me the most flexibility for candid shots, wildlife, and landscapes? Based on the reviews I've read, I would like to stick with Nikkor DX lenses preferably one to start with.

Feel free to correct me or tell me that I need to lean a lot more. I would especially like to hear from a few Cannon bigots as to why the DRebel would be a better decision and what a good starter package would be for that camera.

Thanks,

Jeff


I don't think I am a Canon bigot, but I'll give you my 2 cents. I was in the same situation as you trying to decide between these two cameras back when the dreb was $999. I found a 10 percent off deal at Circuit City on the Rebel and took the plunge. For me it came down to cost, because of what I have seen, the picture quality from both of these cameras is excellent. I'll bet you couldn't tell between the two in a blind test. So it really comes down to price verses features. I feel the D70 is a better camera only because it has a few more features that, if you need, you have. Compare the the differences here first. As far a build quality goes, the Nikon feels sturdier, but if you drop either of them, they will break. Bottom line is this, if you have plenty of money, buy the Nikon, you won't regret it. If you don't buy the Rebel, you won't regret it.
On a side note, I think the rebel is coming with some outstanding rebates if you are trying to build a kit (up to triple I believe). The Nikon I believe has a $100 rebate.
I bought the Rebel camera with 18-55mm kit, a 75-300mm image stabilized lens, and a 50mm f 1.8 lens. You can have all this for less than the cost of the Nikon. Since then I have added the 28-135mm image stabilized lens, and a 420 EX Speedlight flash.

azsooner
12-19-2004, 08:21 PM
Thanks Mike,

The stores have told me plenty about the rebate on the D70. I hadn't heard about a rebate on the DRebel much less that it is that much bigger. That could definitely work into my decision.

Jeff

convergent
12-20-2004, 07:27 PM
They are both fine cameras. I think that most comparative reviews I've read put the D70 in a higher class, and compare it to the more expensive Canon. That doesn't mean they can't both take comparable pictures, it just means that the feature set on the D70 is a bit richer. The thing that draws most people to one or the other is the feel of the camera (personal preference), and whether they have an investment in lenses already. It sounds like you are coming out of the gate from scratch, so either should do fine. I like the feel of the D70 a little better, and the kit lens for the D70 is also a much better lens than the kit Canon lens.... based on other reviews I've read. I have recently moved up to the D2H Nikon, but I've use the D70 for a while and think its a fine camera.

I will tell you, however, that regardless which DSLR you get, plan on the initial expense being a drop in the bucket... and plan on a big learning curve. All the other stuff can add up... lens, flash cards, printer, software, books, flash heads, etc., etc. When you took 35mm pictures, the lab would process your pictures and often make adjustments like white balance and exposure to get a nice print for you. You have to learn to do all of that in the digital darkroom when going to a DSLR. Point and Shoot digital cameras typically do everything for you, but DSLRs are aiming higher and you may find that you want to do more with the pictures than just print them.


Several years ago I retired my 35MM SLR (Minolta X-370) because I was tired of carrying around my gear bag and wanted to go digital. At that time I purchased an Olympus Camedia and have been happy using it for what it is, a decent way to get pictures of the kid to share with the family.

However, recently I have been hearing my SLR calling to me from the closet. I long for the days of taking really nice pictures that you can feel good about. Rather than doing this on my old 35MM I would like to move to a Digital SLR without breaking the bank (not sure if that's possible).

Like most of the posts I've read, I've been driving myself crazy reading internet reviews, viewing sights that post pictures taken with various cameras, and running to stores to feel how the cameras feel in my hand. For me, it has come down to the D70 edging out the DRebel. For no better reason than what the reviews have told me and my opinion of what pictures appear slightly better on the web.

Now to my question: What is a good (doesn’t have to be great) starter package for the D70 that would give me the most flexibility for candid shots, wildlife, and landscapes? Based on the reviews I've read, I would like to stick with Nikkor DX lenses preferably one to start with.

Feel free to correct me or tell me that I need to lean a lot more. I would especially like to hear from a few Cannon bigots as to why the DRebel would be a better decision and what a good starter package would be for that camera.

Thanks,

Jeff

Darice
01-20-2005, 07:59 PM
I've read the responses from some readers as to whether or not you should buy the Rebel as oppose to the Nikon D70. I own a Rebel and have been found "wanting" almost all the time whenever I shoot with it. If you are looking to produce images of EXCELLENT quality (are you a professional photographer?), then you do NOT want to buy the Rebel! There are limitations to the camera (settings) and the exposure is so infrequent especially when using the 550 EX flash that you'll be tempted just to throw the camera away out of mere frustration. If you are buying it for fun, then it's a great camera and will do much for you. However, if you are a professional with a desire to blow your clients away with your images, then I suggest buying the D70. I have used both and was so much more pleased with the consistent flash exposure on the D70! Remember this, even if you buy a very expensive lens, if you attach it to the Rebel, it won't produce miracles. It's like placing awesome speakers on a cheap stereo system. I know trying to figure out which camera to invest in can be quite an arduous and frustrating task, but think in terms of quality more than just price. What do you want in the long run?

D70FAN
01-21-2005, 11:18 AM
I've read the responses from some readers as to whether or not you should buy the Rebel as oppose to the Nikon D70. I own a Rebel and have been found "wanting" almost all the time whenever I shoot with it. If you are looking to produce images of EXCELLENT quality (are you a professional photographer?), then you do NOT want to buy the Rebel! There are limitations to the camera (settings) and the exposure is so infrequent especially when using the 550 EX flash that you'll be tempted just to throw the camera away out of mere frustration. If you are buying it for fun, then it's a great camera and will do much for you. However, if you are a professional with a desire to blow your clients away with your images, then I suggest buying the D70. I have used both and was so much more pleased with the consistent flash exposure on the D70! Remember this, even if you buy a very expensive lens, if you attach it to the Rebel, it won't produce miracles. It's like placing awesome speakers on a cheap stereo system. I know trying to figure out which camera to invest in can be quite an arduous and frustrating task, but think in terms of quality more than just price. What do you want in the long run?

You need to look at the date of the post you are responding to. But thanks for the first person insight. The DReb vs. D70 debate has always been interesting. But now with the 20D the Canon DReb folks have been reborn. Living vicariously through the new champion.

I own a D70, an haven't found any flaws. I changed lenses to a Sigma 18-125 and am happy as a clam. I Don't really care what else hits the market. Why would I need anything else? :)

60mm
01-22-2005, 08:54 PM
Go to your local camera store and try both. I was really looking into getting a 10D for my first DSLR, but after handling the D70 next to a 20D and the DReb, I found I loved the D70s layout and its feel felt much better to me. That was a big enough reason for me to be swayed by the D70. Which one youll prefer know one can say.

gary_hendricks
02-14-2005, 08:17 AM
Go to your local camera store and try both. I was really looking into getting a 10D for my first DSLR, but after handling the D70 next to a 20D and the DReb, I found I loved the D70s layout and its feel felt much better to me. That was a big enough reason for me to be swayed by the D70. Which one youll prefer know one can say.

I was meddling with the 10D too but later decied to go for the D70. The D70 rulez!

gary_hendricks
02-20-2005, 10:31 AM
I was meddling with the 10D too but later decied to go for the D70. The D70 rulez!

There is a rumor of a D90 coming out - but that may be next year.