PDA

View Full Version : blurry pictures dx7590



rcpotts
12-18-2004, 08:24 PM
I just bought a Kodak DX7590, and it is my first Kodak digital camera. Previously I owned a Sony Mavica FX85, and found it to be easy to use. I picked the 7590 beause of the excellent reviews, and the sample pictures on this site.

I consider myself to be a beginner when it comes to photograhy. My pictures are always boring, but I can let a friend use my camera and they take the most amazing shots.

I'm having trouble with my 7590. It seems that the lag time of the shutter is quite long, and my shots are coming out blurry. I've tried a number of different settings but nothing seems to work. Tonight we were at a party and I was taking some pictures, they seems dark and blurry

I would appreciate any suggestions

regards, Ray

PS I believe I am holding the camera steady, but the shutter is too long :confused:

TheObiJuan
12-18-2004, 11:10 PM
go to manual mode, then select shutter priority, and increase the EV until it becomes reasonably bright. You can always fix it in PS or some similar program. I used to have the DX6490, and moved up only because of the low pixel sensor.

Franknbeans
12-21-2004, 12:04 AM
I have the same camera... what mode are you shooting in? auto tends to increase the shutter speed by itself and as long as you have good light the shutter speed should be reasonably fast.

hope this helps.

-Frank

John_Reed
12-21-2004, 03:52 PM
I just bought a Kodak DX7590, and it is my first Kodak digital camera. Previously I owned a Sony Mavica FX85, and found it to be easy to use. I picked the 7590 beause of the excellent reviews, and the sample pictures on this site.

I consider myself to be a beginner when it comes to photograhy. My pictures are always boring, but I can let a friend use my camera and they take the most amazing shots.

I'm having trouble with my 7590. It seems that the lag time of the shutter is quite long, and my shots are coming out blurry. I've tried a number of different settings but nothing seems to work. Tonight we were at a party and I was taking some pictures, they seems dark and blurry

I would appreciate any suggestions

regards, Ray

PS I believe I am holding the camera steady, but the shutter is too long :confused:Try to stay away from long zoom shots in low light. Get closer to your subject(s). The more zoom you use, the more sensitive will be the camera to shaking, even a little bit. The general rule of thumb is, if the shutter speed is slower than 1/focal length, you're in tripod territory. For example, if you're using an effective focal length of 200 mm, you shouldn't be shooting slower than 1/200th of a second.

yonco
12-23-2004, 09:53 AM
Try to stay away from long zoom shots in low light. Get closer to your subject(s). The more zoom you use, the more sensitive will be the camera to shaking, even a little bit. The general rule of thumb is, if the shutter speed is slower than 1/focal length, you're in tripod territory. For example, if you're using an effective focal length of 200 mm, you shouldn't be shooting slower than 1/200th of a second.

Those last two sentences were very helpful, John, thank you so much!

Happy holidays. Have a great year.

samantha
06-03-2005, 07:37 AM
Try to stay away from long zoom shots in low light. Get closer to your subject(s). The more zoom you use, the more sensitive will be the camera to shaking, even a little bit. The general rule of thumb is, if the shutter speed is slower than 1/focal length, you're in tripod territory. For example, if you're using an effective focal length of 200 mm, you shouldn't be shooting slower than 1/200th of a second.


Hi John, Yonco

I don't get you. I don't understand the following:

"The general rule of thumb is, if the shutter speed is slower than 1/focal length, you're in tripod territory. For example, if you're using an effective focal length of 200 mm, you shouldn't be shooting slower than 1/200th of a second."

Would you please explain in simplier ways? Thanks!

John_Reed
06-04-2005, 10:00 PM
Hi John, Yonco

I don't get you. I don't understand the following:

"The general rule of thumb is, if the shutter speed is slower than 1/focal length, you're in tripod territory. For example, if you're using an effective focal length of 200 mm, you shouldn't be shooting slower than 1/200th of a second."

Would you please explain in simplier ways? Thanks!OK. I'm sorry to make it sound complicated. The basic principle involved can be stated: "The longer the zoom setting, the more sensitive the camera is to shaking, which will cause blurry photos." Now your 7590 has a zoom lens which can be zoomed over an equivalent range of 38mm to 380mm. If you shoot a photo at the 38mm end of the zoom range, it's far more likely to be sharp than a photo shot at the 380mm end of the zoom range.

As long as you're shooting in bright sunlight, you should be able to get sharp photos across the entire zoom range, since in bright sunlight your shutterspeed will be very fast, too fast to allow camera shaking to blur the picture. And here I mean shutterspeeds of no slower than 1/500 of a second.

Suppose the Sun goes behind a cloud, or you want to shoot a subject entirely in the shade. Let's suppose that because of the lower light levels, you have to use a slower shutterspeed, say 1/200 of a second. Well, the original "rule of thumb" I stated in my first post would say that, if you want that photo to be sharp, you'd better not be hand-holding the camera for any equivalent zoom setting greater than 200mm. (about 5X zoom for the 7590) Now remember, this is only a "rule of thumb," and some people may be very steady and quite able to hold the camera shake-free at a longer zoom setting. But on the average, the "rule of thumb" applies to the results obtainable to a majority of people.

I hope that was a useful explanation for you? :confused:

samantha
06-09-2005, 02:53 AM
Hello John

Thanks a lot for your detailed explanation.

I guess I understand. In short, are you saying that if low light with slow shutter speed, then best that not to hand hold the camera ,for zoom not greater than 200mm?