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mattc
05-31-2007, 07:04 AM
so ive been reading up ono hdr and i attempted my first one nothing special just to play around with it but it wont let me save it to a jpg. it doesnt list that option for me. im using cs2 and i have a mac i finished it in 16bit do i have to convert it back to 8 bit after im finished?

mattc
05-31-2007, 07:18 AM
ok so i figured it out i did need it in 8 bit

what do you guys think any suggestions and tips/hints
http://i7.tinypic.com/61twm6x.jpg

John_Reed
05-31-2007, 05:56 PM
Were you shooting indoors? It looks like martini glasses on top of a shelf, and an "MGD" sign. But there's a halo around the glasses, maybe from too much sharpening? And a perspective showing a better view of the MGD sign might improve the photo. Just suggestions.

Norm in Fujino
05-31-2007, 06:36 PM
I think the haloing is the normal effect caused by the HDR process, not sharpening; it really depends on whether one likes the effect or not. If you're using the HDR technique to produce unusual results, fine. If you're trying to use it just to get more DR in a more naturalistic way, you have to be very careful or that haloing gives it away.

hokeyguy
06-01-2007, 05:39 AM
You may want to try Photomatix. I think the results are much better than CS2. The trial version does not expire but will put watermarks in the image. Here's a site that I found very interesting and inspiring.

http://stuckincustoms.com/?p=548

John_Reed
06-01-2007, 11:39 AM
I think the haloing is the normal effect caused by the HDR process, not sharpening; it really depends on whether one likes the effect or not. If you're using the HDR technique to produce unusual results, fine. If you're trying to use it just to get more DR in a more naturalistic way, you have to be very careful or that haloing gives it away.I've seen haloing when using the "Shadow/Highlighting" tool or sharpening (or USM), but never from HDR. Here's a simple HDR example from my TZ3, e.g.:

http://John-Reed.smugmug.com/photos/147184134-L.jpg

Do you have some HDR examples where the process itself caused haloing? I've never seen HDR halos myself.

mattc
06-01-2007, 12:37 PM
well heres one of the original images untouched i used 6 for this
i dont really know what im doing i just played with the hdr effect conversion
http://i14.tinypic.com/537c17p.jpg

Norm in Fujino
06-01-2007, 03:50 PM
I've seen haloing when using the "Shadow/Highlighting" tool or sharpening (or USM), but never from HDR. . . .Do you have some HDR examples where the process itself caused haloing? I've never seen HDR halos myself.

First of all, there may be a terminological issue here. When I said "HDR" I was referring to the general subject of doing High Dynamic Range developing, not to any specific program's proprietary process. I use Photomatix for HDR, and I haven't used it sufficiently to consider myself very experienced at it; to date I've most commonly used multiple developments of a single raw image, using Photomatix to generate a single HDR image and then tone mapping for the final blend. Here's a couple of simple examples, taken at the same time:

http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c197/Peregrinor/P1263839HLM_faw1.jpg
http://i27.photobucket.com/albums/c197/Peregrinor/P1263854_HLw1.jpg

Here, the haloing effect is the "misty" or "hazy" effect along the foreground mountains and in the valley areas. Depending on one's taste, these examples might not seem so artificial, since I've actually tried to suppress it so far as possible, and one can imagine such fog existing in such scenes (which is why I liked them).

fionndruinne
06-01-2007, 03:59 PM
I don't think the haloing is natural for HDRs; in the few I have created with Photomatix, haloing turns up when I don't have the Light Smoothing slider all the way up in tone mapping.

John_Reed
06-01-2007, 04:08 PM
First of all, there may be a terminological issue here. When I said "HDR" I was referring to the general subject of doing High Dynamic Range developing, not to any specific program's proprietary process. I use Photomatix for HDR, and I haven't used it sufficiently to consider myself very experienced at it; to date I've most commonly used multiple developments of a single raw image, using Photomatix to generate a single HDR image and then tone mapping for the final blend. Here's a couple of simple examples, taken at the same time:

Here, the haloing effect is the "misty" or "hazy" effect along the foreground mountains and in the valley areas. Depending on one's taste, these examples might not seem so artificial, since I've actually tried to suppress it so far as possible, and one can imagine such fog existing in such scenes (which is why I liked them).The "HDR" I've seen and used starts with bracketed images of the same subject (hopefully taken from a tripod, but not essential), where each image may be taken, say, at -1EV, 0EV, and +1EV, then the three are combined (at least in CS) through a script that should then yield an image with a dynamic range 2EV greater than what one could get with a single image. If you're developing HDR from a single RAW image, that wouldn't be the same thing.

Norm in Fujino
06-01-2007, 04:40 PM
If you're developing HDR from a single RAW image, that wouldn't be the same thing.

Actually the blending idea is identical. In your version, you set up a tripod (to assure having registration of the images) and take three separate exposures at different shutter speeds (leaving aperture the same, to preserve the same DOF); I've done that kind of HDR, too. But in cases where the DR spread isn't excessive--or simply because you don't have a tripod with you--you can take a single image exposed for the highlights, then develop it three or more times in your raw converter, once for the highlights, once for midtones, and once for shadows, etc. That leaves you with three individual frames just as in the separate-exposure method, but obviously with less overalll DR. The blending process in Photomatix is the same, however.

John_Reed
06-01-2007, 05:01 PM
Actually the blending idea is identical. In your version, you set up a tripod (to assure having registration of the images) and take three separate exposures at different shutter speeds (leaving aperture the same, to preserve the same DOF); I've done that kind of HDR, too. But in cases where the DR spread isn't excessive--or simply because you don't have a tripod with you--you can take a single image exposed for the highlights, then develop it three or more times in your raw converter, once for the highlights, once for midtones, and once for shadows, etc. That leaves you with three individual frames just as in the separate-exposure method, but obviously with less overalll DR. The blending process in Photomatix is the same, however.My HDR shots were taken sans tripod, and then I used CS's "attempt to align images?" option. So what you get is something slightly smaller than the original image, I guess it is difficult to get a perfect match from corner to corner. But the combination is made from pseudo-identical frames, each an f-stop apart in EV level.