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skymonkey
07-28-2004, 03:21 AM
I ahve just got my first camera and have a couple of questions. It is a Canon a80.

1) I only intend to view my pictures on my PC so would the 1274x1084 resolution be best to use? Are the higher resolutions just needed for printing much larger pictures?

2) I have noticed on some sites that the normal compression takes up more memory than fine compression. Why is this? Which is the best quality?

3) If i did decide to take my camera to one of these photo booths and print some pictures in 6x4, does it matter if all my images are taken with 1274 resolution?

Hope someone can help. :)

Puck
07-28-2004, 09:13 PM
I have just got my first camera and have a couple of questions. It is a Canon a80.

1) I only intend to view my pictures on my PC so would the 1274x1084 resolution be best to use? Are the higher resolutions just needed for printing much larger pictures?

2) I have noticed on some sites that the normal compression takes up more memory than fine compression. Why is this? Which is the best quality?

3) If i did decide to take my camera to one of these photo booths and print some pictures in 6x4, does it matter if all my images are taken with 1274 resolution?

Hope someone can help. :)

I find it strange that you would spend your money for a 4 mp camera and then use it like a 1.3 mp camera! You could have saved a lot of money by getting a lesser camera!

You can view 4 mp pictures just fine on your PC. The viewing program will adjust them to fit your screen. It you need to downsize the picture to put on a web site or to e-mail, most imaging programs will do that easily. (When you reduce the resolution by software save the smaller file under another name and keep your original intact!)

If you take your pictures at lower resolution you can't regain that lost resolution by software manipulation later. You may find you'd like to print an 8 x 10 or larger and a 1.3 mp image has too little resolution to do that well. I've printed 4 x6 pictures from a 1 mp camera and they were OK but more resolution would be better - certainly for anything bigger.

As for compression (jpeg images), less compession equals larger file sizes. Different companies call different compression levels by different names. On my Minolta I have 3 levels - fine, standard, and economy. With my 3 mp camera and a 256 MB memory card I can store 156 images at fine, 300 at standard and 557 at economy - same resolution but a big difference in compression! The less compression, the more true the jpeg image is to the original image captured by your camera's sensor. I always shoot at the highest resolution and least compression. I never know what I might do with the picture and I want the best starting point I can get. If you start running out of space on your memory card drop back to a higher level of compression but leave the resolution alone. From what I've read, doubling the compression has a lesser effect on picture quality in most cases than reducing the resolution.

The small memory cards supplied with most cameras are, in my opinion, useless. Get at least a 256 MB CF card for that A80 and use the camera to it's full potential. You will be glad you did, I assure you.

bka314
07-28-2004, 11:49 PM
2) I have noticed on some sites that the normal compression takes up more memory than fine compression. Why is this? Which is the best quality?



I can tell you that this is stupid (or they were talking about something absolutely else). The more compressed - the lower the size & worse the quality. Anyway, picture sizes are clearly written in your camera manual - you should not believe anyone else but that.

And I can just repeat what was said before:
You should buy a larger memory card and shoot at highest resolution, less compression if you don't want to curse yourself later.

Bye, Kris

Ray Schnoor
07-29-2004, 04:56 AM
Yes, less compression is better, but you do not have to go so far as saving in TIFF format. This gives you pretty much the same quality as the highest quality JPG, but takes up 3-4 times the space.

John_Reed
07-29-2004, 07:19 AM
I ahve just got my first camera and have a couple of questions. It is a Canon a80.

1) I only intend to view my pictures on my PC so would the 1274x1084 resolution be best to use? Are the higher resolutions just needed for printing much larger pictures?

2) I have noticed on some sites that the normal compression takes up more memory than fine compression. Why is this? Which is the best quality?

3) If i did decide to take my camera to one of these photo booths and print some pictures in 6x4, does it matter if all my images are taken with 1274 resolution?

Hope someone can help. :)
It seems to me that the previous respondants weren't taking you at your word. First of all, you said you just got this camera; it may have been a gift, for all we know, so your investment may not be much.

1) According to the review of the A80 I read, you can't select a resolution of 1274X1084 on the camera; that may be your computer monitor's resolution. The next higher camera setting for you to use would be 1600X1200, a "2 megapixel" mode. Your computer can automatically re-size the image for your viewing.
2) As others have told you, "Normal" compression takes up less space than "Fine" compression, but you may never notice the difference, either on your computer monitor, or on a 4X6 print.
3) If you shoot your photos at the 1600X1200 resolution, you'll have enough pixels to print even an 8X10, so 4X6 photos will look fine.

Jake Conner
07-29-2004, 08:11 PM
Yes, at 1600 by 1200 you'll have enough to print 4x6 or (arguably) 8x10... but either will be better (in the case of the 8x10, much better) with the full 4MP. And you can easily tell the difference between fine and normal compression on screen, always use the lowest compression. Also, a bigger file displayed at 50% onscreen will look better than a file that's half as big displayed at 100%, even though they're the same size onscreen and neither is upsampled. This is because the downsampling needed to display the bigger image at 50% reduces or eliminates image noise. Also, shooting at the largest file size/lowest compression allows you to crop your image and still have a reasonably large file.

Jake