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cshutter
02-23-2007, 03:11 PM
I have been trying to master my new D80 with 18-135mm 3.5 lens and attempting to shoot in low light without a flash. In my old SLR days I used to push the ASA setting from 400 to 1600 and had very good results. With the D80 pushing the ISO setting just creates more response from the camera and does not achieve the desired affect.

Does anyone have experience with shooting in low light and have recommendations of potential settings?

Thanks in advance for the help.

SpecialK
02-23-2007, 07:46 PM
"creates more response from the camera and does not achieve the desired affect."


What does that mean? What is the "desired (e)ffect"?

toriaj
02-23-2007, 09:56 PM
Your 3.5 - 5.6 lens is a great one for many situations, but low light is not its strong suit. As you may already know from your film days, the 3.5 aperture is not available at the 135 mm length. The further you zoom, the more the aperture closes until at 135 mm your maximum aperture is 5.6.

Meaning ... you will get better low-light results from your lens at the 18 mm end. Using a high ISO will also help, and make sure that your white balance is correct. If possible, a tripod might also make a difference. Something I've tried is using a short shutter speed, to minimize camera shake, resulting in a very underexposed shot. Then bring up the exposure in PP. I'm no expert though, and I have yet to create professional results in low light.

If low-light shots are really important to you, you may want to investigate the F/1.4 or 1.8 lenses. I've heard great things about them.

cshutter
02-27-2007, 10:55 AM
Your 3.5 - 5.6 lens is a great one for many situations, but low light is not its strong suit. As you may already know from your film days, the 3.5 aperture is not available at the 135 mm length. The further you zoom, the more the aperture closes until at 135 mm your maximum aperture is 5.6.

Meaning ... you will get better low-light results from your lens at the 18 mm end. Using a high ISO will also help, and make sure that your white balance is correct. If possible, a tripod might also make a difference. Something I've tried is using a short shutter speed, to minimize camera shake, resulting in a very underexposed shot. Then bring up the exposure in PP. I'm no expert though, and I have yet to create professional results in low light.

If low-light shots are really important to you, you may want to investigate the F/1.4 or 1.8 lenses. I've heard great things about them.


Thanks for the ideas. I will experiement and see what happens.