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View Full Version : What's the first thing you would buy for your S3?



SilentBob
01-24-2007, 01:26 PM
Being new and all I need some recomendations of what my first
purcahse should be

Besides a carrying bag what would you buy

I thinking of wide angle lens.

BowerR64
01-24-2007, 01:50 PM
A good set of rechargable batteries, if you already have those then a slave flash.

A slave flash is one of the best things you can add to almost any canon camera to improve your shots.

the Chris
01-24-2007, 02:01 PM
The first thing I bought was a hand strap. Canon delivers an excellent neckband, but when you buy a good bag, it becomes superfluous because you need something to attach it directly to your hand.

Greetz
Chris

downtrodden
01-24-2007, 03:15 PM
Good set of rechargeable batteries.. i highly recommend the Kodak batteries you can get at Wal Mart. They're cheaper than their duracell and enagizer counterparts and for me last longer in camera than do my sets of either of those brand.

then it depends on your style of shooting and your needs. I don't take many indoor shots so a slave flash hasn't been necassary.

DEFINITELY get an adapter tube.. i'd suggest Lensmate's 52mm tube. this will keep your fingers off the lens and give you a comfy place to hold the camera.

For me it was going to be an adapter tube and UV filter to protect your lens- but make sure it is a QUality FILTER. not cheap sunpak piece of crap. My first purchase beyond batteries bag and adapter was a CP filter, which improves your out door shots GREATLY and i leave it on almost all the time to portect my lens. (cheaper to replace an 80 dollar filter than a 350 dollar camera)

So learn your camera first and it's limitations and where you prefer to shoot, then we can give you more accurate advise.. but i think it will be either a Slave flash or a CP filter

Hope my rambling has been cohesive enough to give you an idea.

~Cory

SilentBob
01-24-2007, 03:40 PM
Thanks for the great replies

I like the slave flash idea because I would like to take good indoor shots, I have one question about it though, how does this hook up to the camera to know when to flash?

I have never heard of an adpater tube but then again I am just getting into photography a little heavier now that I have a real camera :D Sounds like a good investment, I will look into this

I would like to take some good outdoor pics as well, spring isn't too far away with the mild winter were are having. What would be a good UV filter to buy and roughly what is the price?

It's starting to look like my first equipment purchase is going to turn into 2 or 3 :cool:


Keep the ideas coming

downtrodden
01-24-2007, 03:58 PM
Silentbob, the slave flashes usually fire via a sensor that senses the firing of your flash which triggers the slave to fire as well.

As for springtime shooting outdoors I would go for a Circular Polarizer and bypass the UV filter altogether. The CP will be good in nearly all shooting conditions, so you'll rarely have to remove it.

I'd suggest a Hoya Circular Polarizer, OR to save a few bucks, go with a Linear Polarizer. they both do the same thing and have the same effect, just one (CP) will work with DSLRS and Linears won't. I use a Hoya pro 1 digital CP. I bought it at 2filter.com for $60 USDollar. You have to have something to attach the filter to the camera so you need an adapter tube. Lensmateonline sells 52mm adapter tubes. That's all you'll need. Just make sure you order a filter that matches the mm of your adapter tube. 52mm appears to be the best/most popular.. followed by 58mm. 68mm is slightly more expensive.

hope all that helps!!

~Cory

nap
01-24-2007, 04:51 PM
I vote for lens adapter (adapter tube) and polarizer - linear or circular depends on your budget. UV filter will also be nice for lens protection but for me, just leaving the lens adapter on is already enough protection for physical damage to the lens. Oh, don't forget the lens cap that will fit the lens adapter. You can also buy a rubber lenshood if you plan to take your camera outdoors. Oh, I almost forgot, a tripod! It will be up to you if you will buy a compact tripod or a heavy-duty tripod. Or why not buy two? Or buy three, add a desktop tripod.

After spending some time with your camera (lots of time, not just 1 day) and maybe after knowing what you want to shoot, you can buy the following:

a. macro lens (Hoya close-up filter set, Raynox DCR-250, etc.)
b. teleconverter lens (raynox, sony, canon, etc.)
c. wide-angle lens (raynox, canon, etc.)
d. slave flash

Just stay away from generic brands like opteka (which is very popular in amazon and ebay) because they can actually worsen your pictures.

XaiLo
01-24-2007, 04:51 PM
After having an S2 crash and burn I have to second the handstrap... then batteries but they won't do you too much good without a larger SD card or a charger. The adapter tube is a must, especially if you find yourself cleaning your lens excessively UV is a great all around... CP won't hurt... adapter lense and or flash :cool:

leyo04
01-24-2007, 04:56 PM
adapter + UV Filter for protection + clip-on lens cap.

I always leave the adpter+UV on the cam for protection. A bit bulky though.

AaronBBrown
01-24-2007, 07:40 PM
For me it was going to be an adapter tube and UV filter to protect your lens- but make sure it is a QUality FILTER. not cheap sunpak piece of crap. My first purchase beyond batteries bag and adapter was a CP filter, which improves your out door shots GREATLY and i leave it on almost all the time to portect my lens. (cheaper to replace an 80 dollar filter than a 350 dollar camera)


For the record, there is no need to get a circular polarizer for a non-SLR camera. Linear polarizers work fine and are about half the cost.

Get the tube and a linear polarizer. It makes a huge difference when greenery, water, or reflections are involved.

downtrodden
01-24-2007, 07:54 PM
I'd suggest a Hoya Circular Polarizer, OR to save a few bucks, go with a Linear Polarizer. they both do the same thing and have the same effect, just one (CP) will work with DSLRS and Linears won't. I use a Hoya pro 1 digital CP. I bought it at 2filter.com for $60 USDollar. You have to have something to attach the filter to the camera so you need an adapter tube. Lensmateonline sells 52mm adapter tubes. That's all you'll need. Just make sure you order a filter that matches the mm of your adapter tube. 52mm appears to be the best/most popular.. followed by 58mm. 68mm is slightly more expensive.

hope all that helps!!

~Cory


For the record Aaron, it's been said. But duly noted. Thanks.

~Cory

nicolelhw
01-24-2007, 08:34 PM
I got an adpator + UV filter + Kenko circular polarizer on my S3 all the time.
(for protection purpose too)

I bought a tripod because I feel this is important when you having low light environment shooting and without increasing the ISO.... and also will make your picture sharp and clear with tripod. So this is basically what I have for my S3.

Thinking to buy a tele and wide angle lens for my S3 too...

Wish you enjoy your S3... ;)

downtrodden
01-24-2007, 08:42 PM
Nicole: You may have an easier time if you use either the CP or the UV and not both.. the more glass you have on your camera, the less light is let in so the slower shutter speed you have to use. I'd suiggest using the CP all the time and just removing the UV. I use my CP as the 'constant on" and as a protector too.

And let us know what tele you get and how you like it!

~Cory

tarponteaser
01-25-2007, 05:47 AM
I just purchased an S3 as well, and ordered the Canon conversion lens adapter w/and sun hood along with a 1 gig memory card (kingston has a rebate till end of January, and bhphoto has a good price).

Filters are worth investing in...I like polarized for the beach,skylight for general protection, and have various special effects for playing around.

A tripod is invaluble for taking family portraits with the timer, or for long distance telephoto shots.

I like to camp and enjoy the outdoors so I have a wide angle and a telephoto for wildlife shots. (They are from another camera so a step down ring will be my next purchase to use these on the Canon).

It is a great camera, enjoy using it and learning its abilities ...I sure am!

Randy

p.du.v
01-25-2007, 06:35 AM
Well me new gear arrived by courier at 8am this morning (after paying for it at 12pm yesterday! :D).
I had the luxury of being able to buy a bunch of things at once, so will list off my experience with it all thus far.

I got a Raynox 6600PRO wide converter lens.
The reason I didn't get the Canon wide is because it doesn't have front threads to attach a filter with. The 6600 does, which means you can use a wide lens with a neutral density or polariser filter with it. With the Canon you can't (least with the version I researched).

If you get a wide converter lens and you will be using it at night or indoors, look at getting a slave flash. The wide lens will block out the majority of your flash (apparently. Not tested yet). Or you get shadows or such.

I got a circular polariser (Marumi) which is essential for getting nice rich colours and blocking out harsh sunlight, reflections etc.

I also got a neutral density filter (Tiffen) for landscape work.

Remember, if you want to get a Raynox wide converter, and get a polariser filter, but will also want to use the polariser by itself and not just with the wide lens, you will need a step ring...
The filter thread on the outside of the Raynox is 72mm. The standard thread on an adaptor ring is 52mm.
If you want to use the filter with or without the lens, you will need a 52mm->72mm step ring.
So you can effectively go:
adaptor ring -> step ring (from 52mm to 72mm) -> attach polariser.
adaptor ring -> Raynox 6600 -> attach polariser.
Without this step ring you will need to also buy a 52mm polariser to use without the wide lens...

Ugh, that make sense?? haha.

I actually got 2 adaptor rings, and a UV filter. I have an adaptor ring + UV filter on when it's in my bag, and then take that off and put the 6600 straight on (which has its own adaptor ring).

I got a Manfrotto tripod with an 322RC2 ball head (http://www.manfrotto.com/Jahia/site/manfrotto/cache/off/pid/2319?livid=80|81&idx=83). I loooove this ball head, it is very versatile and so easy and effective to use. Though expensive, of course.. >.<


The one thing I would impress on anyone who is going to buy lenses and filters is to really think through what sizes go on what, and thus what step up rings you may need etc.

Erm.. if you have any questions about the gear I got, feel free to send me a priv message on this site, or post here.

I am new to photography myself, so not really up on all the technical stuff.

mjsneddon
01-25-2007, 06:44 AM
Silentbob, As for springtime shooting outdoors I would go for a Circular Polarizer and bypass the UV filter altogether. The CP will be good in nearly all shooting conditions, so you'll rarely have to remove it.
~Cory

I like to use a polarizing filter quite a lot too. You will find, however, that you will need to remove it much of the time when the light level is low. This filter will decrease the amount of light reaching the sensor substantially. When the light level falls, you will be faced with having to use a tripod or contending with blurred images.

lathe
01-25-2007, 01:55 PM
In regards to lens adapters, check out thread http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=26745 which discusses the pros/cons of plastic versus metal lens adapters.

leyo04
01-25-2007, 06:03 PM
Well me new gear arrived by courier at 8am this morning (after paying for it at 12pm yesterday! :D).
I had the luxury of being able to buy a bunch of things at once, so will list off my experience with it all thus far.

I got a Raynox 6600PRO wide converter lens.
The reason I didn't get the Canon wide is because it doesn't have front threads to attach a filter with. The 6600 does, which means you can use a wide lens with a neutral density or polariser filter with it. With the Canon you can't (least with the version I researched).

If you get a wide converter lens and you will be using it at night or indoors, look at getting a slave flash. The wide lens will block out the majority of your flash (apparently. Not tested yet). Or you get shadows or such.

I got a circular polariser (Marumi) which is essential for getting nice rich colours and blocking out harsh sunlight, reflections etc.

I also got a neutral density filter (Tiffen) for landscape work.

Remember, if you want to get a Raynox wide converter, and get a polariser filter, but will also want to use the polariser by itself and not just with the wide lens, you will need a step ring...
The filter thread on the outside of the Raynox is 72mm. The standard thread on an adaptor ring is 52mm.
If you want to use the filter with or without the lens, you will need a 52mm->72mm step ring.
So you can effectively go:
adaptor ring -> step ring (from 52mm to 72mm) -> attach polariser.
adaptor ring -> Raynox 6600 -> attach polariser.
Without this step ring you will need to also buy a 52mm polariser to use without the wide lens...

Ugh, that make sense?? haha.

I actually got 2 adaptor rings, and a UV filter. I have an adaptor ring + UV filter on when it's in my bag, and then take that off and put the 6600 straight on (which has its own adaptor ring).

I got a Manfrotto tripod with an 322RC2 ball head (http://www.manfrotto.com/Jahia/site/manfrotto/cache/off/pid/2319?livid=80|81&idx=83). I loooove this ball head, it is very versatile and so easy and effective to use. Though expensive, of course.. >.<


The one thing I would impress on anyone who is going to buy lenses and filters is to really think through what sizes go on what, and thus what step up rings you may need etc.

Erm.. if you have any questions about the gear I got, feel free to send me a priv message on this site, or post here.

I am new to photography myself, so not really up on all the technical stuff.

locked and laoded. The excitement of having all the goodies arrive all at once. hehehe...

BowerR64
01-25-2007, 06:22 PM
I find i use my camera more in lower light situations then anything else thats why i sugest the slave flash. I guess it depends more on what and where you shoot.

jonalta
01-25-2007, 11:58 PM
I got my S3 stuff in the following order:
I bought my S3 and at the same time got a carrying case, 2 Gb SD, lens adapter (58mm) and UV filter, rechargeable batts (2 sets) and charger. So, I guess these were more important for me, then.
Then a few days after, I bought a tripod and a slave flash.
The wideangle and tele con came next together with a bigger carrying case (after 3 months), then additional adapters (52mm) and polarizer filter.

SilentBob
01-26-2007, 07:39 AM
Thanks for the help.....and believe me it is really helping.

So far I have for my S3 camera


2Gb SD card
Set of 4 rechargable batteries


What intrests me in this order is


Carrying Case
52mm Adapter not sure if plastic or aluminum yet
Hoya CPL
Slave Flash



Just a few questions about those items

Is there an advantage between 52mm to 58mm adapter:confused:

The Hoya CPL they have standard, HCM and Super HCM, is there an big advantage to the multi coated besides the dollar value:confused:

For a slave flash is there any particular brand or any technical specs I should be aware of when purcahsing one:confused:

Thanks Again everyone!

downtrodden
01-26-2007, 10:46 AM
the advantage of a 52mm vs 58mm is the cost of filters alone. 52mm filters are generally cheaper than their 58mm counterparts. both work equally well. just one is cheaper.

as for the coats, a better coated lens is desirable the lower level filters allow slightly less light to travel through- vs the better coated. the better coated will let slightly more light thlrough so you won't have to step down your shutter speed as much.

~Cory

Marek8
01-27-2007, 03:02 AM
I am another happy owner of this great camera (its my very first camera :) ).

I would like to get some protection for the lens, because I am affraid that I will scratch it or something like that.
I think I can use the original canon adaptor and 58mm polarization filter, but do I need to use that adaptor if I want to attach a filter on the lens?
I want to keep the filter on it 24/7, and looks like it wouldn&#180;t be much handy to have that long adaptor on it. Can&#180;t I use 52mm filter directly on the lens?
Also, is it a good idea to keep the polarization filter always attached? Wouldn&#180;t it reduce the image quality in some situations? If yes, what other filter/thing can I use for this?

SilentBob
01-27-2007, 11:11 AM
Ok so far I have bought these items


Lensamte 52mm adapter
Hoya 52 mm HCM CPL
Small table top Tripod


The adapter and CPL will be here in probably 7 to 10 days.......I can't wait
The tripod I bought last night.

I think this should be a good start.

Thanks for your help.

downtrodden
01-27-2007, 11:19 AM
Marek.. A QUALITY cpl filter like Hoya, will not affect image quality adversally. It WILL however, reduce the light getting to the sensor.. so in lowlight situations you'll have to use a slower shutter speed than normal and this could lead to motion blur. The only other option is to get a quality UV filter but these also reduce light somewhat- the next option is to get a CLEAR protector filter. 2filter.com sells these. but personally i would go for a filter that has some positive benefit to your picture taking, such as a CPL, if you have to remove it indoors or in lowlight, just remove the filter, not the adapter.

And yes, in order to attach any filter, you MUST have the adapter on, as the S3 lens is not threaded.

~Cory

lathe
01-27-2007, 12:31 PM
SilentBob,

If your the kind of person that carries their camera bag around a lot (ex: hiking, touristing, etc) I recommend waiting to buy your camera bag until you have all the equipment you plan to buy. Then go to a camera store and buy the smallest bag that will hold all your stuff. This avoids you having to buy a bigger one later if you buy a teleconvertor or something else that is large for your camera. You will quickly find that getting a camera bag that "has room to grow" will be bulky and annoying.

However, if you tend carry your bag to a location and set it down (ex: going to birthday parties, watching your kids in school sports, visiting friends), having a bag with a little room to grow is a good idea.

Either way, I find M-Rock is an excellent line of camera bags (http://www.m-rock.com/)

Douggie
06-02-2007, 10:44 AM
then how does the adapter fit on it. I just got an S3 and was considering a lens protector as many here have. Some folks say that in all their careers they have never scratched a lens and they wouldn't think of using one on their S3. Here on this forum many say use the Hoya clear polarizer lens with the lensmate adapter in 52mm. If this is sound advice, then which hoya. I have only read the manual twice up to this point. I will start photographing tomorrow. I am getting ready to take the family on a long awaited vacation and really want to protect my new camera. Thanks you for any advice.

griptape
06-02-2007, 11:07 AM
The lensmate adapter is the thing that you attach to make the front of the camera threaded. Press the little black button beside the lens, and you'll be able to twist the ring off. The adapter attaches to that. Then you can add filters to the adapter. There's no vignetting at any focal length, just makes the lens slightly longer to walk around with. It'll look like this (minus the film canister to diffuse the flash if you wish)

http://i105.photobucket.com/albums/m235/nothingisworking/Diffuse.jpg

Douggie
06-02-2007, 11:45 AM
so the ring that is one the camera comes off by pressing the little button and then attach the new lensmate adapter in the same place?? Sorry about seeming goofy but I would hate to mess anything up. Then with the new adapter, does another lens cap come with it that fits over the Polarizer lens?

griptape
06-02-2007, 02:29 PM
Yep, the tube goes where the ring is now.

And the canon lens cap doesn't fit the filters, but they sell a lens cap that does and I think it's $4. One of my favorite parts of having the adapter is actually being able to forget I have the lens cap on, as even at full telephoto, the lens won't touch the filter, so I can turn it on and then take the lens cap off if I want.