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View Full Version : Sanyo Eneloop batteries?



dtarrance
12-14-2006, 01:34 AM
Okay, I'm looking to get the longest life and highest output NiMH batteries I can find. I am very intrigued by the Sanyo Eneloop batteries, but I am saddened by the fact the AA batteries only go up to 2000 mAh. From all of the reviews I've read so far, people only compare them to regular alkaline batteries, and not to other NiMH batteries, esp. ones with higher mAh ratings.

My questions are....

Does anyone here have any experience using these Sanyo Eneloop batteries? Are they really worth the extra cost for only a 2000 mAh battery?

OR

Would I be better served just buying a high mAh NiMH (2500+) battery instead? What would you guys/gals recommend as far as brands go?

And finally, can someone recommend a good and fast (1-2 hour) NiMH charger for me? I know about the 15 - 30 minute chargers, and most people agree that they damage the battery by charging it too quickly.

For what it's worth, I'll be using these with a Fuji FinePix S6000fd camera.

Thanks in advance to anyone/everyone who can help me out!

.: David

TNB
12-14-2006, 07:12 PM
I have a set of the Eneloop batteries; however, I have yet to use them and don't really plan to since I purchased them as "emergency" spares since they are supposed to be pre-charged.

I've had very good luck with GP (Gold Peak) 1.2v 2500maHs and now there are at least 2700maH GPs on the market (as far as AAAs and AAs are concerned, I've also tried Quantaray, Powerex, Powerbase, Intellect, Lenmar, Energizer, and so on). Some companies also rate their batteries at 1.25v but until someone else can explain why, I'll continue to think it is just a marketing ploy. Here is a link to the GP specs:

http://www.gpbatteries.com/pdf/GP270aahc_DS.PDF

Regarding chargers, I usually use somewhat higher end chargers that I purchased for charging batteries in RC racing and unless you want to pay a $200 or so for a charger and power supply, I'll let someone else recommend a charger. Examples include Triton, Novak, and MRC. There are also Shulze, Competition Electronics, Futaba, etc. that are a lot more expensive.

I do also use an inexpensive Radio Shack "Fast NiCd/NiMH Battery Charger" that probably does only take somewhere between 1 or 2 hours, but I have never timed it and that also depends on the maH. I really don't know the model number since I mounted it inside a plastic fishing lure tray and use the compartments to hold various sets of batteries and a digital multimeter. I can write that it has a smoked plastic cover on top and four battery bays, so it can charge up to 8 AAs or AAAs. It can also charge a couple of 9v batteries.

Good luck.

pas49ras
12-15-2006, 03:49 PM
Would I be better served just buying a high mAh NiMH (2500+) battery instead? What would you guys/gals recommend as far as brands go?

I have been very happy with the Maha MH-C204W charger..it's small(easy to pack in the camera bag) and does a nice deep charge every time. As far as batteries..I've had the best luck with Duracell's 2700mah sold cheaply at Walmart's camera dept. Another plus..these batteries are very light in weight. I as also looking at the new Sanyo's..but was concerned with the low MAh rating.

http://www.thomas-distributing.com/maha-powerex-mh-c204w-nimh-battery-charger.htm

Delta Kilo
12-17-2006, 07:42 PM
The prime selling point of the Eneloops is that they retain charge for longer than other brands. This is great for when the camera (or flash) only gets dragged out a few times a year and/or you got no other charged batteries around.

I bought 8 Eneloops the other day but haven't fully tried them. According to the packaging it looks like they were a batch from June 06. I immediately popped 4 into my flash gun and fired off a dozen test flashes. There's no way any of my other NiMh's retain enough charge for that after 5-6 months.

Rapid chargers I don't think do any great favours to the life or capacity of rechargeable batteries. I'm on my 3rd budget-mid priced charger and have had enough of overheated, undercharged batteries and am eagerly awaiting the arrival of Maha's newest Powerex MH-C9000 WizardOne

canon_A620
12-24-2006, 07:53 AM
The decision to use Eneloops or high capacity NiMH depends upon your usage. If you use your device regularly, and want to get the highest capacity, then the high cap NiMH cells would be your best bet.

If you don't use the device regularly, and don't want to charge the cells before each use, the Eneloop would be the best choice.

I've been using Sanyo 2700 mAh cells in my Powershot for about 6 mo. I don't use my camera every day, and I found myself having to charge the cells before each charge.

I use Eneloops as my primary batteries in my Powershot, and I keep a spare set in my camera case. If I'm going to be doing alot of shooting on a particular day, or over a span of 2-3 days, I'll charge up my Sanyo 2700s and use them since they have the highest capacity, and self-discharge won't be an issue over a 2-3 day period.

Popie
01-13-2007, 07:17 AM
canonA620 got a very good point there. Too bad I just bought a set of 4 a week ago and can't know the pro & corn of it. I will update here once I have tested it.

Popie

canon_A620
01-19-2007, 12:20 PM
These cells appear to be holding up very well. Using a multimeter, I tested 2 Eneloop AA cells that were fully charged 2 weeks ago and have been sitting unused. They both tested out at 1.35V. Another 2 AA Eneloops that were charged at the same time, but had been in one of my Digicams for 2 weeks, and had about 10 shots on them. They both tested out at 1.35V. One pattern others an myself are noticing is that they are very consistent with their voltages.

Yet another 2 Eneloops charged last week, and had about 200 flash pics taken with them registered at 1.29V! It appears these cells maintain higher voltage until they deplete, which is a very good sign. I'm picking up (8) Eneloop AAA cells on my way home this evening, $7.99 /4 pack @ HHGregg. :)

reppans
01-29-2007, 07:27 PM
The decision to use Eneloops or high capacity NiMH depends upon your usage. If you use your device regularly, and want to get the highest capacity, then the high cap NiMH cells would be your best bet.

If you don't use the device regularly, and don't want to charge the cells before each use, the Eneloop would be the best choice.

I've been using Sanyo 2700 mAh cells in my Powershot for about 6 mo. I don't use my camera every day, and I found myself having to charge the cells before each charge.

I use Eneloops as my primary batteries in my Powershot, and I keep a spare set in my camera case. If I'm going to be doing alot of shooting on a particular day, or over a span of 2-3 days, I'll charge up my Sanyo 2700s and use them since they have the highest capacity, and self-discharge won't be an issue over a 2-3 day period.

What he said.... I'm using the same set-up... Sanyo 2700s for the high use days, and Eneloops for the lower use days/weeks.

Completely consistent with this forum (most I've ever learned about Ni-Mh rechargeables) Also bought my batts/charger from here, highly recommended:
http://forum.ripvan100.com/phpBB2/

This guy, on the last post, independently tested the Eneloops:
http://www.stevesforums.com/forums/view_topic.php?id=96500&forum_id=51

canon_A620
01-29-2007, 07:33 PM
The person who did the indepnedent Eneloop tests has done many other tests with NiMH and Lithium cells. I recommend taking some time to review his NiMH shootout, CR123A shootout, and charger review threads. Myself, and many others, have found his testing invaluable.

You can find the threads here (http://candlepowerforums.com/vb/showthread.php?t=133440)

reppans
01-29-2007, 08:49 PM
Awesome link canon _A620.... RipVan100's Equipment rates very highly on his test, so I guess I found the right stuff... and a lot more to learn and geek out with ;).