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mdytz
12-13-2006, 05:40 AM
Hello,

I had bought a black Sony T9 back in March and took some great pictures (good colour, illumination and noise) with it. Suddenly the black "ink" started to peel off and I had the camera changed by the store. That was not a surprise. Shame on Sony...I ended up with the grey T9. It looks less sexy, but if I could take the same nice pictures then it would be no problem.

Initially either I hadn't paid much attention (or the sun was on my side), but for the last 2 months, all my pictures in a bright environment (unclouded sun setting or "winter" sun) end up being washed out. I don't know if the denomination is correct, but the pictures are capturing much more light than I want them to (for example, the sky end up having this very strong whitish feel and that distorces the whole picture). In order to get less light, I set the exposure compesation to -0.3 (I though about -0.7, but decided against it - it would be too extreme) and the pictures are still capturing a lot of light.

Later I tried a stronger saturation to compensate, but the pictures looked fake. I played with the White Balance mode, but had no good outcome from that one either (or I simply forget to change among the options). The T9 doesn't give me any manual option of white balance, shutter speed or aperture.

In such scenario, anyone could give me any tip of why the nice pictures on the black T9 cannot be repeated on the grey one? Can the colour of the camera influence on its input (from my physics class, I would say so)? Or could it be related with the firmware version? Any tip on what I might do to fix the white unbalance? Any batch post-editing that could be applied (I am not a very fond of loading 100 photos in CS2 in order to "Auto Color" them)?

Cheers

M.

PS: I am not a very advanced PS CS2 user. :)

cgl88
12-13-2006, 01:27 PM
I had this problem while taking pictures in Capri, Italy. The ski seemed washed out and favored the 'land'.

Auto color will not correct because the camera did not pick up the contrast in the skies.

Try playing with your "OEV settings" (use "program" instead of "auto"), and make sure your focus is on multi, not spot.

mdytz
12-14-2006, 10:37 AM
Hey cgl88,

The focus is already in Multi (I usually use the Program mode) and I am currently using a -0.3V for the EVO.

Did you manage to fix the problem you faced at Capri? You changed anything on the settings? Or it simply changed naturally?

Cheers

sla
12-15-2006, 12:40 AM
Hello,
Initially either I hadn't paid much attention (or the sun was on my side), but for the last 2 months, all my pictures in a bright environment (unclouded sun setting or "winter" sun) end up being washed out. I don't know if the denomination is correct, but the pictures are capturing much more light than I want them to (for example, the sky end up having this very strong whitish feel and that distorces the whole picture).

Hello
Can you post some photos to compare?
Anyway it is true that light during winter days, differs to summer day light. Usually there is less contrast, images sometimes seem softer. And sky is not always blue. It is sometimes whitish, no matter whether it is summer or winter.
I have not Sony. Maybe try to ask you question in Sony forum?
regards
s.

mdytz
12-17-2006, 08:43 AM
Some pics with what I consider a weird lighting condition. Suggestions or am I being too picky? Is there any way to have less of the white effect on the foreground (buildings) and a clearer sky?

At the moment, I use manual with -0.3V and no other major changes in configuration (some times I saturate more), but I hardly ever play with the White Balance modes.

mdytz
12-17-2006, 08:43 AM
Or am I simply choosing bad angles (against sun) and time to take my pictures? Both were taken around noon.

sjseto
12-18-2006, 12:55 AM
Or am I simply choosing bad angles (against sun) and time to take my pictures? Both were taken around noon.

That's exactly what I think the problem is. It doesn't look like a white balance problem at all. When the sun is directly overhead or slightly in front, it's difficult to get a good-looking shot. The sky will be all blown out and the foreground will be overly dark, just as it is in your photos.

The best thing to do is to shoot at a different time of day. If you can't do that, then I'd suggest using some negative exposure compensation (just like you're doing now), and adjust in an image editor later. I'm not very adept at post-processing either, but try playing with Curves, or adjust with Shadow/Midtone/Highlight (I use Paint Shop Pro X, but I'm sure Photoshop has the same tools, although the names might be different).

Stephanie

sla
12-18-2006, 02:54 AM
I agree with Stephanie. Looks like it is a problem with high contrast, quite common in digital photography. It seems to be simillar to this: http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=25862

If your subject is dark (for instance in deep shadow) and background is bright, you have to experiment and sometimes choose what to sacrifice. If the subject is close, flash lamp may help.
In theory it is possible that your second camera has more trouble with very high contrast than the first one, but I don't think so. Try to avoid high contrast and see if your photos will look better.
regards
s.

P.S.
You may also take a look here:
http://www.dpreview.com/gallery/photo.aspx?gallery=sonydscp200_samples&photo=6
http://www.dpreview.com/gallery/photo.aspx?gallery=sonydscp200_samples&photo=13
http://www.dpreview.com/gallery/photo.aspx?gallery=sonydscp200_samples&photo=19
See the sky? ;)
regards

cgl88
12-18-2006, 01:30 PM
There is nothing wrong with your camera. The time you have chosen for the shot are very difficult ones, so the camera has a hard time making the correct exposure.

Here's what my Capri shot looked like:

http://photos.photosig.com/photos/58/18/1891858-58ca03a37bb0dde3.jpg

Notice the bleached out sky? My eyes barely remember some clouds, but it was truly mostly white. The way to get around this is to adjust the OEV. I still don't know what the correct OEV would have been, so I am taking the camera out and taking shots similar to your situation so I'll know how to take the shot 'correctly' next time.

It is also possible to make edits in PhotoShop, like applying filters to enhance your photo.

In the example below, notice the location of the sun (left of the photo) and notice how the picture improves (relative to the first shot on the left) as you move to the right. Notice the exposure gets better? Therefore, the location of the lens relative to the sun would also impact your shot. The photo was taken around 4:30pm.

http://photos.photosig.com/photos/74/08/1870874-c2ad9d876bbefe3a.jpg
Excuse me for the poor cropping and editing. I have yet to re-submit this "work" on photosig.

cgl88
12-30-2006, 05:15 PM
mdytz,

for a late-afternoon shot, try setting your oev to -1.7 or -2.0. If you have a subject in the foreground, make sure your flash is on. The contrast of the sky/clouds will improve.