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Olya
11-29-2006, 03:54 PM
Iím a beginner in digital photography. I love taking photos very much and I read different articles and photography tutorials. The first advice for novices is Ďpractice, practice and practiceí. I would practice a lot, but the problem is that I donít have many ideas of what to shoot. I know that each photograph should render a message, but what if there isnít much interesting things around. When on holidays, I usually go abroad and/or visit lots of interesting places, but I donít know what to shoot in everyday life.

So, people, Iím curious where do you find ideas for interesting photographs?

JLV
11-29-2006, 04:38 PM
Look at other peoples work. Many post their websits. Vistit these they may give you ideas.

Have fun

toriaj
11-30-2006, 02:35 AM
Try different types of photography. Macro, abstract, portraits, candids, night shots, landscapes, it goes on and on ...

The most important thing for me is just to get my camera and walk around. I see pictures that way that I never would have seen if I didn't have my camera in my hand, looking for pictures. Often, I have something in mind to shoot, but my best pictures end up being of something I accidentally came across.

Munnin
11-30-2006, 06:10 AM
I am just a beginner but I can tell you what is working for me.

1) always travel with your equipment. Your camera should always be within reach.
2) shoot anything that looks vaguely interesting.
3) evaluate every shot you make and ask how it could have been improved.
4) use the photo-assignment thread as a school assignment, and everywhere you go look to fulfill the assignment.

Example last sunday I was waiting for my wife to make it to the restaurant. There were five glasses of water on the table with light streaming through them. I arranged them with a used half and half container and shot close to them.

I learned about using the manual focus to set the focus point I wanted, that shooting on level with the subject created the most visually interesting shot and was working on minimizing the over exposed regions.

GaryS
11-30-2006, 06:25 AM
Get the book "Learning to see Creatively" by Bryan Peterson. Its an easy to read book full of wonderful photographs, where he explains what he does to find a great picture just about anywhere....

And don't let the fact that you aren't traveling make you think there is nothing interesting around. For people in other parts of the world (or even country) would find everything near you very exotic!

FLiPMaRC
12-01-2006, 07:46 AM
I guess I got lucky when I bought my Canon S3. This thread has been very inspiring to me and to a number of people: http://www.dcresource.com/forums/showthread.php?t=21728

RebelRat
12-02-2006, 11:26 PM
It doesn't matter what you shoot, as long as you enjoy shooting it.

cat
12-03-2006, 04:13 PM
http://www.flickr.com/

If you can't find any ideas there then you need your head testing :D

Set yourself up a free account and utilise the 'favourites' facility. Mine are here http://www.flickr.com/photos/23123614@N00/favorites/ You can also upload some of your own pics. Should warn you though it is very addictive :D

zmikers
12-03-2006, 05:41 PM
I had to stop bringing my camera with me to work. The more you shoot then the more ideas you get and everything starts looking interesting. As I drive to work i see so many things that make me say, "Oh, that's a good shot." I was late so many times because of stopping so much on the drive. But, I am working in Taipei Taiwan so there are many interesting things everyday. The point is, before you know it, you will start seeing many creative shots in everyday life that you may not have seen before. "Learning to see" comes with time.

Other than that, what everyone else said is a good idea. Keep shooting and keep looking at other photos to get ideas. Don't worry, it will come.

SpecialK
12-09-2006, 05:15 PM
I don't think every photo has to have a message - it should just be visually stimulating in some way. This one says nothing, but I like it:

marble911
12-17-2006, 09:55 AM
Books gave me some good ideas. E.g. one book by John Hedgecoe. I think it was "The New Manual of Photography". It has sections about different types of photography and things you could concentrate on, e.g. colours, structures, special lighting etc. I used it to make some photo assingments for myself.
And, as the others said, just take your camera with you and look carefully. There's something interesting everywhere, you just have to find it.

Pave
12-20-2006, 12:23 AM
The best way is IMHO just walking around and looking. I've walked with my camera hundred-times through our small town and almost every-time I spotted something new. Something that could make a good shot and that I had never noticed before...
Wtching other people's pics also helps...
And to post your pics on specialized websites is also good idea... Sometimes you can get very good advice... Unfortunately I know of no english websites like this and czech ones I use wouldn't be much help for you I guess.
So my advice is obvious: Always keep looking and trying... and check the internet :)

zmikers
12-20-2006, 02:14 AM
Get the book "Learning to see Creatively" by Bryan Peterson. Its an easy to read book full of wonderful photographs, where he explains what he does to find a great picture just about anywhere....

I have just recently got my hands on this book. It's brilliant, so far. Gives many ideas and exercises you can do too. The point is that just becasue somethings work for some people, does not mean it will work for you. You should take in all ideas and then just go from there. But, I recommend this book to beginners and experts alike. You can never get too many new perspectives. Two heads are better than one (I guess 4 eyes are better than 2).

Gary_P
12-20-2006, 06:35 AM
I agree.

I'm reading Understanding Exposures by Bryan Peterson.
I'm still a bit lost. I think I may need a book that starts a little before this one.
It's not the content, but the ideas.
I understand how to shoot, it's just that other people's pictures are more interesting then mine.
All my shots look like a travel brochure. HAHAHAHA They do!


As for me, I shoot anything that either moves or stands still. From the tiny moth and bee to the 747's that pass overhead my house.
In fact as soon as I get a good enough bee in flight I'm going to Photoshop it in with the 747. LOL

Do you live in the city or in the country? Are there any birds around?
As I'm writing this, I'm watching a tiny fruit fly crawl across my desk, wishing I had a macro lens so I could take a shot of him/her. (him? her? :rolleyes: )

I am a nature nut. I admit. If it's cute and fuzzy, all the more.

Take a look around you and shoot everything. Hold your camera at weird angles, and just throw away all the bad ones. Digital is free (if that's what you own).

We have a bird feeder outside our window. Yup, that was me on the ladder, cleaning those windows in preparation for the winter shots in the snow.

Post a few of your shots. Most of all, have fun.

GaryS
12-20-2006, 08:18 AM
GaryP, take a look at Bryan Peterson's other book "Learning to See Creatively" (I think I am repeating myself here... I sound like a Peterson fanboy!). It focuses less on shutter speed, aperature and exposure rules, and talks about how to take interesting pictures.

The two books work well together.

Gary_P
12-20-2006, 10:21 AM
I also got his other one on making the most of your digital camera, but it's almost like the same book.
He does have a really, really fine looking wife. Wow.

I'd have a camera too. And 2 beautiful daughters too.
Better buy the shotgun now, Bryan, and get ready on the front porch.

GaryS
12-21-2006, 09:26 AM
GaryP, I'm with you about Mr Peterson's wife.... Very sharp.

CMYanko
12-21-2006, 10:47 AM
I'm a huge fan of Peterson's work, I find it very inspiring. His newest book on Portraiture is excellent as well with a lot of Photoshop techniques to boot.

I also really like the Miotke (from BetterPhoto.com) book for any newbie with a camera as it covers everything in a simple straight forward, though not in depth, way.

Gopher
12-21-2006, 11:15 AM
My opinion; reform your question:

"How do I make what I shoot interesting". That includes Post Processing and Printing/Mounting/Display.

Here (http://photography-on-the.net/forum/showthread.php?t=247996) is a related thread.

My advice: Divide and conquer.


Pay attention to light/shadows,
patterns (and particularly where those patters lead to),
remember that light and color can have pattern.
Aaaaand, the MOST COMMON PROBLEM, remember that the background is part of the shot too! PP object deletes are perfectly valid (for non-journalistic use photos)!


Have a premise (ie: what idea, mood, feeling, impression, etc are you trying to convey). Even if you're just documenting a birthday party, each shot will have messages like:


fun
energy
future/past
beauty
innocence
etc.

I find that isolating and nailing a single aspect will add punch to the photo. You can "convey the other stuff" in some other photo.

Learn Tricks and Technique. Examples:

Placing camera on ground to emphasize drama,
get close up to expand some facial feature (huge eyes, etc)
Use tele + wide aperture and get close to subject to blur background
Use Neat Image on dirty images to give polished look (works on hard looking clean ones too as a complexion softener)
Use Rule of Thirds to add a little tension and mystery
Expand Rule of Thirds to put subject way on the side to dramatise their environment
Learn how to make dramatic B&W conversion using channels
Shoot straight up a tree holding lens close for artistic effect
On expansive landscape scene, have something (tree, rock) blurred in the forground to add dimension
Learn to point the camera down a bit to capture the whole subject (like a bride's dress)
Learn to hold your camera completly still
Develop reflexes to take the shot before it vanishes .5 seconds later.
etc




Like a writer trying to find that inner connection and master it's articulation, the photographer (over time) finds and develops visual articulation technique. I often just shoot then find the message in PP - amazing what a crop and texture can do. Then next time I shoot I know what happened last time in PP.

That's all great philosophically speaking; but I also find surfing PBASE.com and copying ideas a great inspiration. :D :eek:

zmikers
12-21-2006, 05:24 PM
Many of you "Peterson fan boys" you know who you are I'm one too;) , know that one thing IMHO that makes his shots so great is that he really utilizes the above head and on your belly perspectives. Loads of his pics are from different perspectives than eye level, lying on his back looking up, lying on his belly filling the foreground with the grass, and many shots looking straight down on his subject. Genious!

Ronin005
01-09-2007, 04:59 PM
Iím a beginner in digital photography. I love taking photos very much and I read different articles and photography tutorials. The first advice for novices is Ďpractice, practice and practiceí. I would practice a lot, but the problem is that I donít have many ideas of what to shoot. I know that each photograph should render a message, but what if there isnít much interesting things around. When on holidays, I usually go abroad and/or visit lots of interesting places, but I donít know what to shoot in everyday life.

So, people, Iím curious where do you find ideas for interesting photographs?

well, this is an old topic but I also havent visited this site in a while. also, I sometimes have the same problem with not knowing what to take pics of, but I have learned one thing. DONT THINK ABOUT IT, just go about your daily life and have your cam with you when ever possible.

me, I enjoy going for drives out of the blue and most of the time I have my cam. I dont look to take pics, as I go for the drive but sometimes I come across something that just needs to be captured.

the more you think about it the harder the time you will have!!

TNB
01-09-2007, 05:33 PM
So, people, Iím curious where do you find ideas for interesting photographs?
Since I live in a tourist spot, there are lots of different places that I can take photos. However, I also try to take some photos from varying perspectives unlike the typical tourist photos that I have seen. This could mean looking up and/or down and taking photos, as well as from the norm--using one's imagination to make the typical photo interesting. This could be planned, but unplanned as well--carrying the camera around scouting and waiting.

Also, simply review photos, books, websites and so on. Who knows, there may be a niche area that you may enjoy taking photos of when you can't be out taking the photos that you initially wanted to shoot.

Granted, every photo may not necessarily send a message, but it is still practice gained and learned for those interesting times.