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lrgross
11-28-2004, 09:09 PM
Im sure this question comes up on this board alot and am sorry Im asking again but I cant keep still when im shooting my pictures. I have a canon powershot a75 that I use to take pictures of stuff I post on ebay but they rarely come outclear. Any advice would be great. Thank you very much.

John_Reed
11-28-2004, 11:02 PM
Im sure this question comes up on this board alot and am sorry Im asking again but I cant keep still when im shooting my pictures. I have a canon powershot a75 that I use to take pictures of stuff I post on ebay but they rarely come outclear. Any advice would be great. Thank you very much.You either need to get a camera with an image stabilizer, like a Canon PowerShot S1 IS, or a Panasonic DMC-FZ3, et. al., OR, get a tripod. If you can't keep still, can't stabilize the shots somehow, you'll have many blurry shots. Of course, anything you can do to get fastest shutter speed will help, including using maximum aperture (is it f2.8 for your camera?), and even goosing up the ISO to a higher number will reduce blur, though then you might get undesirable noisy pictures. I'd try a tripod to start. I'm sure many eBay posters use tripods to get good shots of their merchandise.

Victoria
11-30-2004, 08:02 AM
Do what the title says, decrease the shutter speed, but make sure the lighting of your object is good (or the pic will come out dark). Or use a tripod! :D

If you still have problems, use the running man mode on your canon.

lrgross
11-30-2004, 02:41 PM
Thank you both for the advice. I will try it out when getting ready to post my next item. Also what is aperture? :)

Ray Schnoor
12-01-2004, 10:42 AM
"decrease the shutter speed"

I assume that you mean increase the shutter speed, or have the shutter open for a shorter amount of time. For example a shutter speed of 1/100 second is faster than a shutter speed of 1/60 second.

"what is aperture?"

Aperture is how wide you have the iris opened in the lens when the photo is taken. In aperture, a smaller value means that the iris is opened up wider, letting in more light. The wider the aperture, the more light is exposed to the sensor which decreases the amount of time you need to have the shutter opened to achieve a correct exposure.

With your camera, Canon A75, you have the option of shutter priority where you set the shutter speed and the camera sets the aperture, aperture priority where you set the aperture and the camera sets the shutter speed, or full manual where you set the aperture and shutter speed.

Mark_C
12-27-2004, 09:03 AM
On a couple of occasions I managed to compensate for not having a tripod by using the camera strap. Put the camera strap around your neck, hold the camera firmly in both hands and put some tension into the strap, now press your upper arms against your chest (creating a triangle between camera, neck-strap and elbows). This helps compensate for the movement generated when you press the button.

Sounds an odd pose but can help.

soulsolution
01-13-2005, 04:02 PM
"decrease the shutter speed"

I assume that you mean increase the shutter speed, or have the shutter open for a shorter amount of time. For example a shutter speed of 1/100 second is faster than a shutter speed of 1/60 second.

"what is aperture?"

Aperture is how wide you have the iris opened in the lens when the photo is taken. In aperture, a smaller value means that the iris is opened up wider, letting in more light. The wider the aperture, the more light is exposed to the sensor which decreases the amount of time you need to have the shutter opened to achieve a correct exposure.

With your camera, Canon A75, you have the option of shutter priority where you set the shutter speed and the camera sets the aperture, aperture priority where you set the aperture and the camera sets the shutter speed, or full manual where you set the aperture and shutter speed.

Hi All,
Just like most of the ppl in this string, I am a newbee to digital photography and I am eagre to learn more and take better pics. BY THE WAY, THE ABVE QUOTED TEXT WAS A GREAT PIECE OF INFORMATION. I have a Canon A75 camera and I slowly learning about Apertures/Shutter speed/Flash etc. Now, I know it is very hard to really explain in detail, but can anyone provide me with more examples on HOW and WHEN exactly use these various settings? I mean, WHEN shud we play with the aperture setting, and WHEN with the shutter setting and things like that?

Any help in this regard will be greatly appreciated.
Shall look forward to all ur replies.
Thanks!
The above was some really good information.

John_Reed
01-13-2005, 10:52 PM
Hi All,
Just like most of the ppl in this string, I am a newbee to digital photography and I am eagre to learn more and take better pics. BY THE WAY, THE ABVE QUOTED TEXT WAS A GREAT PIECE OF INFORMATION. I have a Canon A75 camera and I slowly learning about Apertures/Shutter speed/Flash etc. Now, I know it is very hard to really explain in detail, but can anyone provide me with more examples on HOW and WHEN exactly use these various settings? I mean, WHEN shud we play with the aperture setting, and WHEN with the shutter setting and things like that?

Any help in this regard will be greatly appreciated.
Shall look forward to all ur replies.
Thanks!
The above was some really good information.When you take a picture, you look at it in the "Review" mode, and you say "Hmmmm. Looks too dark." That means that for the aperture you selected, your shutter speed was too short. So, you could either make the shutter speed longer (like go from 1/100 to 1/60), or you could make the aperture wider (like go from f5.6 to f4.0) On the other hand, if your picture seems to be too light, you have to do the opposite thing, either by speeding up the shutter, or narrowing down the aperture. Sometimes, you can't slow down the shutter speed, say if you're trying to shoot some action shots at maybe 1/125th of a second. So if the picture is too dark, your only option is to widen the aperture, say from f5.6 to f4.0. I hope you find that tidbit to be helpful. :o

Lest
01-14-2005, 03:23 PM
If by chance you are living in the UK, get over to one of the Asda stores, preferably a Walmart (BIG Asda).

They have got some STAR 42 tripods which in my humble experience, are pretty good for the money (15)

It seems much more stable and robust than any of the Jessops ones on offer for the same money.

QR camera mounting plate which is good, if a bit fiddly to get the camera on to start with.

When is is set out, it seems very stable.

Well worth the money if you are e-bay selling as there is nothing more appealing to buyers than a GOOD pic of what they are buying.

Mind you I have only just started getting serious with Photgraphy (FZ20) and wouldnt claim to know it all so there may well be better options around.

Cheers

Les
(Cr%p photgrapher, MTb wipit extraudinare)

Lest
01-14-2005, 03:28 PM
Pic Here
http://www.valuedigital.co.uk/tripods.htm

Tard
01-22-2005, 09:28 PM
One really good way to lower the blur is to put a two second timer on your shot. This works especially well if you're taking a macro shot or using a zoom.
When you push down to take a picture you, usually, slightly move the camera which can cause a heavy amount of blur. With the timer you get a few seconds to steady yourself after the slight movement.

plumb
01-29-2005, 01:39 PM
When you take a picture, you look at it in the "Review" mode, and you say "Hmmmm. Looks too dark." That means that for the aperture you selected, your shutter speed was too short. So, you could either make the shutter speed longer (like go from 1/100 to 1/60), or you could make the aperture wider (like go from f5.6 to f4.0) On the other hand, if your picture seems to be too light, you have to do the opposite thing, either by speeding up the shutter, or narrowing down the aperture. Sometimes, you can't slow down the shutter speed, say if you're trying to shoot some action shots at maybe 1/125th of a second. So if the picture is too dark, your only option is to widen the aperture, say from f5.6 to f4.0. I hope you find that tidbit to be helpful. :o


thanks to all who replied to this thread,I like, soulsolution am a novice but I have learned a lot just reading this thread,I have a cannon S1is ,thanks again

Plumb

TekNoir
02-03-2005, 02:01 PM
Here is some advice that I have given many people when they compain of getting glurry pictures when using a digital camera.

Stop trying to take pictures using the LCD monitor unless that is your only option! Turn it off and use the eyepiece instead.

This makes a world of difference for most people. Not only does your face help to support the camera more, but with your arms no longer in an unnatural position, muscle fatigue doesn't set in so fast. Muscle fatigue causes micro-shakes in your hands whether you are aware of it or not. Another useful side-effect is that you'll find your battery life lasting much longer.

Another word of advice -- The closer you are to your subject or the farther you have zoomed in, the less movement it takes for your pictures to come out blurry. The camera is much more forgiving if you stand back some and don't zoom in quite so much.

Hope I've helped.

gary_hendricks
02-10-2005, 09:31 AM
Im sure this question comes up on this board alot and am sorry Im asking again but I cant keep still when im shooting my pictures. I have a canon powershot a75 that I use to take pictures of stuff I post on ebay but they rarely come outclear. Any advice would be great. Thank you very much.

You know, a great book I recommend is The National Geographic Photography Field Guide 2nd Edition: Secrets to Making Great Pictures

Check it out:
http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/079225676X/qid=1108056456/sr=8-1/ref=pd_bbs_1/104-5846177-4719901?v=glance&s=books&n=507846