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View Full Version : Which camera????



fotogmarc
11-17-2006, 11:24 PM
Hi, I'm trying to get some subjective input. I've narrowed my list to 2 cameras: The Olympus E500 and The Sony R1. All I've the gotten are the political answers of: "as long as you know their strengths and weaknesses" I want to spend around $700 (both fit this) for in 3 or 4 years I feel the market will be revolutionized by new technology then I'll spend some more for a high quality D-SLR. I'll be doing mostly landscapes with mixed pics thrown in. I've read every review out there and am leaning towards the E500, but am not interested in buying new accessories later on. I like the convenience of the R1 (one lens).
Can someone give me something significant to chew on?

Gary24
11-18-2006, 08:51 PM
Hmmmm...Don't know much about the Sony but it seems like a case of apples and oranges to me. One is a true digital SLR and the other seems to be a hopped up (and maybe hyped up) point and shoot. The Sony only has one lens (24 to 120) where as the E500 comes with 2 different lenses ranging from 28mm to 300 for the same price with room for expansion (although the lenses are pretty expensive). The Sony wins the Megapixil race but 8 vs 10 for most shots is not really a big deal in my world. Out of the box my E500 has been awesome. My father has a Nikon D70 and commented that my pics were better then his in some cases and I have more "Bells" then he has. Recently I was shooting pics of retriever dogs across a lake that was about 100 yards long and was very surpirsed at how ineffective my 300mm equilivant lens was. Can't imagine how the 120 would be in the same situation. However I can put a longer lens on but you could not with the Sony. One of the main reason I moved up from my point and shot to a DSLR was because of the limited long range lens options . I really like my E500 and it has made me look at the world through the lens (even without the camera to my eye) much more then my old PAS ever did.
Good luck with your purchase no matter which way you go.

www.how-wood.com

SpecialK
12-13-2006, 03:28 PM
With the Olympus you can get a decent 2-lens setup for a very reasonable price. Third parties are starting to make lenses for it, too, so you could perhaps get the body only and a single more suitable lens. Olympus has a 2x crop factor so you have to go really low mm to get really wide (such as 10 0r 12 mm).

The Sony has a very high quality lens, and is a bit wider than the standard Olympus lens, which will help with landscapes if that is your main "focus".

If you don't mind swapping lenses, I would go with the Olympus as it is a DSLR.

However, it you don't want to tote 2 or more lenses, the Sony may be your best bet, though it seems a bit unwieldy.

kgosden
12-14-2006, 06:37 AM
The Sony is a good camera, but I thought it weighs quite a bit. Also, unlike the E500 it has an electronic viewfinder not a true optical one. While Sony tends to have very nice EVF's they are not the same as optical ones for clarity. Of course on the Sony you get the good old P&S live preview on the LCD for ease of framing overhead and low shots.

fotogmarc
12-16-2006, 11:30 PM
Well I purchased the E500 and am quite happy. The lenses offer a lot of variety. As soon as some decent weather comes around I'll try and post some pics. The autofocus has some problems in the dark, does anybody have any suggestions on which mode is best?
Thanks for your replies

SpecialK
12-17-2006, 12:06 AM
In low light go manual focus. It should no big deal and will be faster if not more accurate.

Effzeeone
12-23-2006, 02:42 PM
Well I purchased the E500 and am quite happy. The lenses offer a lot of variety. As soon as some decent weather comes around I'll try and post some pics. The autofocus has some problems in the dark, does anybody have any suggestions on which mode is best?
Thanks for your replies

The E-500 flash will strobe for use as a focus assist light, and seems to work better than the usual dedicated focus assist lights on other cameras. You'll need for the flash to be popped up or to be set for auto pop-up, and you'll also need to for the AF Illuminator option to be turned on and make sure the Manual Flash option is turned off. Also, if your autofocus mode is set for C-AF (continuous) I believe the AF Illuminator function is disabled. Could be wrong, but I think that's what happens. When I have it set for S-AF (which is my typical setting) the AF Illuminator works, but when I switch it to C-AF it does not.

I just re-read the above and it sounds a little confusing if you're not familiar with the options/menus yet. Just post a reply if you can't figure it out.

Riley
12-24-2006, 06:29 AM
the Sony R1 is the best image generator of all the point and shoot cameras, the lens is capable of better images than most kit lenses for dslrs. But the thing weighs a ton and looks like it fell out of the ugly tree with that silly flip LCD design. Rumour has it, it wont be around all that long either.

The Olympus E500 and E300 are in abundant deals around ebay at the moment, and can be had for the lowest price of any dSLR i would think. In the end, the versatality of the dSLR is going to get you in. Add to that the quality of Olympus glass is excellent particularly the 11-22 ultra wide, and the 7-14 ridiculously wide lenses.

If it was me, Id go for the Oly, as the bodies are bargain basement.