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joe lovotti
11-11-2006, 08:51 AM
All Digital SLRs have user settings for Saturation, Contrast and Sharpness.

Since I shoot RAW because I want the maximum opportunity to be creative after the shot, I need to know where to set these sliders?

My goal is a RAW shot with zero in camera processing. A true digital negative. Just the image as received by the sensor.

Setting the sliders All High is obviously out because that is too much in camera processing.

My question is should the sliders be set at the middle or at the bottom?

Do cameras start at zero, the bottom position of the sliders, and increase image processing as you move the sliders or is zero the middle and image processing is a +/- thing from there.

Thanks all,
joe

Koosla
11-11-2006, 09:58 AM
Since I shoot RAW because I want the maximum opportunity to be creative after the shot, I need to know where to set these sliders?
Settings such as Contrast, Sharpness and Saturation are only applied to the JPEG output; they may be stored somewhere in the RAW file, perhaps as metadata, but they're not actually applied to the image itself, so that when you open the RAW image in your converter, those settings might then be applied to the image -or not. And even if they're, you can change them or even ignore them completely and choose whatever contrast, sharpness and saturation settings you want; and those will be the ones applied.


My goal is a RAW shot with zero in camera processing. A true digital negative. Just the image as received by the sensor.
I don't think that's really possible, and even if it was, you wouldn't like the results. The difference between what the sensor actually captures, and what you see in even the most "unprocessed" RAW conversion in your PC, is quite important. For starters, and unless your camera uses a Foveon sensor, what you'll see is the result of de-mosaicing (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demosaicing) , plus correcting the original linear luminosity capturing, plus a given color space, plus a given white balance, plus whatever other image adjustments your RAW converter chooses as default.
There are some converters, like dcraw and Bibble Pro, that will let you see a decent approximation of what the RAW truly looks like; and believe me, it's not pretty. Whatever you want the resulting image to look like, it will be processed, one way or the other.


Do cameras start at zero, the bottom position of the sliders, and increase image processing as you move the sliders or is zero the middle and image processing is a +/- thing from there.
As I said, that's only relevant for JPEG images. And yes, I believe the minimum (or most negative) value usually means the least processing, so to speak. But it's not always really "no processing"; for example, and as stated in DPReview's analysis of the Panasonic FZ-50, all the noise reduction settings -even the lowest- are still quite a lot of noise reduction, compared to the truly "zero" noise reduction you get by shooting RAW.

D Thompson
11-11-2006, 07:39 PM
All Digital SLRs have user settings for Saturation, Contrast and Sharpness.

Since I shoot RAW because I want the maximum opportunity to be creative after the shot, I need to know where to set these sliders?

My goal is a RAW shot with zero in camera processing. A true digital negative. Just the image as received by the sensor.

Setting the sliders All High is obviously out because that is too much in camera processing.

My question is should the sliders be set at the middle or at the bottom?

Do cameras start at zero, the bottom position of the sliders, and increase image processing as you move the sliders or is zero the middle and image processing is a +/- thing from there.

Thanks all,
joe
It doesn't make a difference where you set those in-camera sliders - they're not applied in any way to the RAW image. Whatever RAW converter you use will have default settings and they will be applied and changed.

cdifoto
11-11-2006, 08:28 PM
Set them to whatever you want, and they're only applied (at least in Canon's system) if you use the manufacturer's supplied software for conversion. Third party softwares (RawShooter, Bibble, Adobe Lightroom, Adobe Camera RAW, etc) ignore those parameters.