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View Full Version : Lens to the Canon EOS Rebel 300D



Johan
11-25-2004, 08:12 AM
Hi! I'm about to buy the Rebel 300D without the standard lens "EF-S 18-55 3,5-5,6". If I would buy a compact camera it would have 10x optical zoom but what kind of lens will that be to the Rebel 300D?

TenD
11-25-2004, 09:17 AM
10x could possibly mean one of two things. One accepted way of stating 10x is the way they do on a fixed focal length instrument, such as binoculars or a rifle scope. In that case 10x would mean 10x magnification, or 10x what you would see with your naked eye. Expressed in 35mm (film size) terms a 50mm lens is accepted (although it's not exactly) as a "normal" lens(meaning it sees about the normal fov that your eye would see) so a 10x magnification would be ~500mm lens.
When the term is applied to a zoom lens it means the zoom's range is 10x it's focal length. That focal length could start any where, 28mm, 35mm, 50mm, etc. So to get a 10x zoom you would multiply the starting focal length by 10,
28-280, 35-350, 50-500, etc.
To add a little confusion to the mix the latest crop of mid priced DSLRs have a crop factor. This is caused by the sensor being smaller than a frame of 35mm film was. The Canon DSLRs: Drebel, 10D, 20D, D30, D60 all have a 1.6x crop factor, this is like taking a scanned 35mm slide, and then cropping out the center 6/10 of it, with no loss of resolution. A 50mm focal length has the effective focal length of an 80mm lens used with 35mm film. This is wonderful for the telephoto end of the zoom, but you lose wide angle capability on the other end (a 28mm has the fov of a 44.8mm).
A do it all, super zoom lens is a difficult thing to accomplish and have it be optically good at all focal lenths. There are a few 10x zooms out there that have acceptable quality across the entire range: The Canon 35-350L which has been discontinued, and the Canon 28-300L, these lenses are very expensive. People have good things to say about the Sigma 50-500 although I have no experience with one. The Tamron super zooms 28-200 and 28-300 are of generally poor quality and the image quality suffers. Here is one test site, in general you will see most test sites agree and you will see an average of lenses at the top and bottom.
http://www.photozone.de/2Equipment/easytxt.htm
In general, I would split up your focal lengths a little to decrease cost and keep image quality high. The Canon 28-135 IS lens is a very good lens and would be a good start. The Canon 17-40L is an excellent lens and give you a decent wide end, although it is a little short on the long end. Canon is offering rebates on the Drebel right now and up to triple if you buy qualifying products. You could buy the Drebel and the 28-135 IS and the 17-40L and get $300 back on your camera and another $120 on the lenses. http://bobatkins.com/photography/digital/rebates.html

TenD
11-25-2004, 09:41 AM
I would also look at the new Canon 17-85IS lens, I didn't think of it, because it won't fit on my 10D. Some of the Sigma EX lenses have gotten good reviews also, I am not familiar with Sigma, except for my disappointing experience with a 28-200 many years ago.

D70FAN
11-25-2004, 01:29 PM
I would also look at the new Canon 17-85IS lens, I didn't think of it, because it won't fit on my 10D. Some of the Sigma DX lenses have gotten good reviews also, I am not familiar with Sigma, except for my disappointing experience with a 28-200 many years ago.

I'm using the Sigma 18-125 DC lens on my D70 and use it as my everyday shooter. At least as good as my 18-70 nikkor DX. They have a Conon mount as well.

For an 11X+ lens, Tamron announced a new 18-200 coming out next spring (with your DReb crop factor of 1.6 this works out to 28.8mm-320mm).

Food for thought.

Johan
11-26-2004, 02:21 AM
I apreciate all the help.