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snap
10-24-2006, 10:47 AM
What is the use of the P setting on Canon EOS cameras? It appears to be fully automatic, with the ability to use a number of optional functions, e.g., ISO setting, aperture, shutter speed.... Why would I use P instead of, say, AV or TV or M?

Robert Besen
10-24-2006, 06:51 PM
P stands for program mode. It just means that the camera sets both the shutter speed and the aperture for you for the metered exposure value. The balance between speed and aperture is detemined by the camera's processor. It can be simpler and faster to use this mode since no decision is required on your part, and the exposure will be correct within the limits of the camera's metering.

Paul79UF
10-25-2006, 06:33 PM
"P" is just like "Automatic" with access to more options.

AV is Aperture Priority for controlling the depth of field with the camera handling the shutter speed automatically

TV is the same thing but for the shutter speed.

snap
10-26-2006, 10:37 AM
Automatic setting sets the "correct" shutter speed and aperture too. What advantage does P (program) setting have? If I use AV the camera sets the corresponding shutter speed. If I set the camera to TV the camera sets the corresponding aperture. I am still curious what advantage the P (program) setting provides.

JLV
10-26-2006, 12:42 PM
The camera chooses what it “thinks” is the optimum combination of f-stop and shutter speed. Where you have chosen f2.8 and camera then selected a fast shutter speed, in P the camera might pick f5.6 and a slower shutter speed.

The Mangler
10-26-2006, 02:29 PM
What is the use of the P setting on Canon EOS cameras? It appears to be fully automatic, with the ability to use a number of optional functions, e.g., ISO setting, aperture, shutter speed.... Why would I use P instead of, say, AV or TV or M?

The only real reason I can think of to use P mode is this: Let's say that you don't know how to work Av, Tv or M mode - but you want to shoot RAW. Full Auto mode cannot shoot RAW, P mode can.

P mode can utilize options that full auto can't, such as using custom functions, it's all in the manual. The ability to shoot RAW is the only reason I see to use P mode though. P mode is basically Full Auto with RAW.

snap
10-26-2006, 04:19 PM
Maybe that's it. That would be a good reason to use P.

The Mangler
10-26-2006, 05:47 PM
"P" is just like "Automatic" with access to more options.

Personally, I don't see the point of having P mode. Yes, you can access more options (AF point selection, metering mode, AEB, ect... All of which you cannot use on auto mode), but if you understand why you want to use those options you probably know how to use manual mode or Av & Tv. If you weren't happy with the way full auto was doing things you would switch to M, Av, or Tv - which can do everything P can do and more.

If you needed to use some of the features that P mode has over Auto, why would you still be using P instead of Av, Tv, or M? That's why I don't really consider the extra features of P mode to have any use. If I wanted those features I wouldn't be using P mode. The only thing P mode has that makes it worthy of selecting is the ability to shoot RAW. Anything else P mode can do, another mode can do better. If Full Auto mode could shoot RAW I don't think they would have even made a P mode.




Sorry. Rant over.

RichNY
10-26-2006, 08:23 PM
Consider P to be automatic and Auto to be 'idiot proof automatic' where you can't accidentally change things. From a marketing perspective the name Idiot isn't a big selling feature.... except in book titles.;)

Rando
10-27-2006, 02:48 PM
P is the automatic setting for your camera. If you spent a good deal of money on a Digital SLR, don't use P. Instead, I recomend that you mantain the dial on Ap (aperture priotity) for normal to sunny days, and Sp (shutter priority) for low light situations, as a general rule.
If you want to capture motion (or not), than you should take care of the shutter speed first even in a sunny day. If you want to reduce the focus area (or encrease), than you should firts take care of the the aperture.

Stoller
10-27-2006, 03:14 PM
If you want to capture motion (or not), than you should take care of the shutter speed first even in a sunny day. If you want to reduce the focus area (or encrease), than you should firts take care of the the aperture.

Well said. ;)

snap
10-28-2006, 08:55 AM
I have never used P, but have been curious why it is there. However, after the preceeding discussion, I can think of an application for me. I do very little flash photography, so do not feel comfortable using the AV setting in flash photography. I use auto. Since auto produces only jpeg files, and P can produce RAW, P would give me the advantage of getting RAW files from flash pics.

tommccarty
10-28-2006, 09:39 PM
Heck, I used Aperture priority today to take pictures inside a house when flash would have created high spots or beyond the opt distance. Since I have IS built in, it worked like a charm. Good for museumes too as no flash
Low light non moving items like pictures. Shutter for capturing flight

all in all each condition is different.. but P is just making it easy to take the thing and not look for your glasses.... jeesh. What a joke when you get old and have to get a quick shot in..http://www.dcresource.com/forums/images/smilies/eek.gif

The more ways you learn to take a shot the more fun you will have.
Have you found the other program modes on your camera yet? Preset these for your unique or every so often shots like landscapes, sports .... On myFZ20 you have 2 more on knob : SCN1, SCN2. I think the D200 may have 6.. so a function is there for a reason.

Bob_Benner
11-06-2006, 09:52 PM
P mode makes it easier for alot of people to take good shots. I get much different results using P than I do Auto. Fow begginers P mode is awesome, and the you don't waste anytime fumbling with settings and missing a shot. I like to use P alot, and mostly use M because I like to learn everything I can about different settings. In the end they all have a good use, just depends on who is using the camera.

RebelRat
11-06-2006, 10:17 PM
I not sure if any of you know this, but, P mode you can still change the selected setting. after you half press the shutter, you might not like what the camera chose. All you do is turn the finger wheel and the settings will change to higher or lower aperture.

John_Reed
11-06-2006, 10:32 PM
If you select either shutter priority or aperture priority modes, you fix one of those parameters, period. Say you chose a shutterspeed of 1/500. Under daylight conditions, this would provide a reasonable range of apertures for most cameras. But if you leave it at 1/500 and walk inside, suddenly it's the wrong choice, because the camera's aperture will max out, and you'll still not have enough light for a proper exposure. So P mode makes it possible to juggle both parameters automatically, and when you walk inside, the shutter speed will drop to give you a decent aperture range, and thus the correct exposure, for those new conditions. I almost always use P mode with my long-zoom Panasonic cameras; it rarely lets me down. I'll switch to M mode for making a panorama series, and sometimes on a hazy, overcast day when I want to make the fastest possible shutterspeed, I'll select Av mode to keep the lens wide open as much as possible.

Robert Besen
11-07-2006, 06:42 PM
I think RebelRat hit the nail on the head for the best use of P mode, but I don't know if all cameras have a program shift function. On my KM 5D I can be looking through the viewfinder and turn the wheel to shift the f-stop/shutter speed combination. You can certainly do the same with aperture or shutter priority, but the advantage with P is that each time you half press the shutter the f-stop/shutter speed combination will be reset to a reasonable value, rather than the previously set aperture or shutter speed. Then you don't have to turn the finger wheel so far.