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View Full Version : Canon S2 IS - HELP!!



upsgirl88
10-06-2006, 05:46 AM
Morning! I posted this in the Canon forum but haven't got a response yet so I thought I'd try here. I don't know where else to go for help without going back to the store where I bought the camera.

I'm not an experienced photographer by any means so I'm looking for some help with settings and I have a couple questions about the S2 IS that maybe someone here might be able to help me with.

The only photography I do is concert shots. I was recently hired by about.com to do reviews so I need to make sure I can get some good shots at concerts.

I've used my s2 IS for several shows now and I have the same problems every time.

I generally shoot in Automatic because I don't know enough about the setting to change them.

Here's the problem I have. I've been told that there's no point in using flash because you're not really close enough for the flash to matter, but when I don't shoot with the flash the photos come out blurry. When I do shoot with the flash I cannot get the camera to snap a picture quick enough to get the shot I want. It takes a good 10-15 seconds of fighting with it before it actually takes a shot.

I've tried the continuous shooting mode and the pictures come out blurry with that as well.

I'm getting very frustrated but I've seen other people's concert shots with the S2IS and it's gotta be something I'm doing because I've seen some awesome shots.

The other question I have is about the audio on my camera. Has anyone had trouble with the audio? When I shoot a video at a concert (I know I'm not supposed to, shhhh) the audio is absolutely terrible and you can barely make out what they are singing. Maybe I have the wrong settings?? Or is this a common problem??

Any help you can give me would be much appreciated. And any setting advice in general.

Thanks!
Bobbi

cat
10-06-2006, 06:11 AM
Where did you see good concert pics with the S2? Just curious because I use mine on fully manual but wouldn't bother even trying at concerts as the S2 is rubbish in low light..... Re the flash your info is correct, wouldn't make a blind bit of difference at the kind of range you'ld be looking at. Hate to say it but I think you probably have the wrong camera... best you can do is up your ISO ( which will make the pics noisy - grainy ) set your fstop to the smallest setting ( f 2.7 but don't think it'll go that low on full zoom - is probably more like 3 something ) and see how low you can get your shutter speed without it blurring... :(

ale_g
10-06-2006, 06:15 AM
Hi.
Although I am not very well versed on photography (I can hardly consider myself as an amateur). When shooting indoors everything falls into flash and ISO sensitivy. More on that, because as you said you will be shooting from above the flash range, everything is upon ISO. Every P&S camera balances ISO vs noise. When you raise ISO the noise is also raised and sometime dramatically. Depending on the picture size you want to have you may shoot in ISO 400 and apply a good Noise reduction software (www.imagenomic.com is good and free).
You can also try to lower the exposure in order to reduce the blurr, but again once you correct it in post processing, the noise level will be raised back.
If you are going to shoot seriously in those conditions you might need to change your camera to another one with higher ISO's.

There are a lot in the market now that goes upon 1200 ISO while yours ranges only up to 400.

I hope this help
Ale_g
S2is.:)

upsgirl88
10-06-2006, 07:43 AM
Hey, thanks so much for your input. What camera would you suggest for concert settings? I'm not looking to go out and spent $1000, so I'm looking for a "cheaper" model if you will. What's the best I can get for a reasonable price?? Is the Lumix any good?

szammit
10-06-2006, 08:15 AM
I'm a newbie at best, and I only have my S2 (no other camera to compare with, therefore) but Automatic sucks for night shots, especially for something like a concert. Stick to manual and try to have as slow a shutter speed as possible, without blurring. I don't know offhand the exact values, but I'd keep it at 1/20 or less, probably. And jack up the ISO - as ale_g said, use a noise-reduction program which inevitably results from ISO 400+.

The Panasonic FZ series, I think, has good noise levels at high ISOs. The Fuji equivalent of the S2, however, has a lot of noise - it goes up to some ISO1600, I think. You'd best check www.dpreview.com (http://www.dpreview.com) for reviews and, more importantly, test shots.

cat
10-06-2006, 10:27 AM
Well despite your ignoring my first attempt to be helpful I'll still give it another crack! :p No, you don't want a Lumix, what you want is a DSLR... although that may well require learning something about cameras first... would still be interested to know where exactly you saw these 'awesome shots'

Prospero
10-06-2006, 12:00 PM
The Panasonic FZ series, I think, has good noise levels at high ISOs. The Fuji equivalent of the S2, however, has a lot of noise - it goes up to some ISO1600, I think. You'd best check www.dpreview.com (http://www.dpreview.com) for reviews and, more importantly, test shots.

I think you got that the wrong way around. The Panosonic FZ series are very noise at ISO values above 400. Fuji's closest alternative to the S2 would be the S9000 (or perhaps the S5600), which is pretty good at high ISOs - for an ultrazoom that is. It images at ISO 800 are still usuable, while the images at ISO 1600 are limited to small prints. The camera does not have IS though and I have once heard that it takes quite a while to get used to that camera.

Prospero
10-06-2006, 12:02 PM
Well despite your ignoring my first attempt to be helpful I'll still give it another crack! :p No, you don't want a Lumix, what you want is a DSLR... although that may well require learning something about cameras first... would still be interested to know where exactly you saw these 'awesome shots'

I agree, the Lumix will not do any better job at taking concert pictures. Unfortunately, a DSLR with a lens suitable for taking concert pictures will cost well over 1000 euros.

tim11
10-06-2006, 03:05 PM
Upgirls88,
I find it surprising that you post this message in Canon forum and get no replies; there seems to be an enthusiastic crowd there.
Anyway, as people suggested already, the best you can do is to use max aperture (i.e. smallest number) and try ISO400 (if ISO200 fails to do the job).
Forget about Panasonic. They are good cameras of course but not for this purpose.
One new promising camera is the Fuji S6000fd. I'd suggest you take a closer look at it. It is the king of lowlight performer having ISO capability up to 3200! It has no optical image stabiliser but IS doesn't work with concerts anyway.

szammit, the light sensitivity maybe the same but the noise level is certainly not. For instance, image on my FZ20 on ISO400 is rubbish but F30's ISO1600 is more than good enough to make small prints.

John_Reed
10-06-2006, 03:30 PM
Seems like the quandary would be getting enough zoom to do closeups on performers in a camera that can deliver the high ISO shots. F30 has the ISO, but not the zoom. Maybe that Fuji one you mentioned would do the trick albeit with not-quite-ultra zoom.

It seems to me that if you're getting paid for these shots, it'd be good business to get the right tool for the job, i.e., a decent dSLR and a reasonably long telephoto zoom to go with. Unless this is just a "one shot" deal, your performance would improve by going that route.

tim11
10-06-2006, 03:39 PM
Yes John. I wouldn't recommend F30, it's the S6000fd is the one I'm pointing at. Whatever comments I made re. F30 were for comparison only.
F6000fd has decent zoom to 10x optical.

version150
10-13-2006, 04:29 AM
<did chuckle re your understandable frustration, Cat>

:D

Am I assuming that you went straight to the gig with your new camera and got bad results? Did you consider what a hostile environment that would be? Are you in the press pit or in the mosh at the front??

:confused:

Thought about a monopod, to steady yourself? What about starting with simple subjects/locations with artificial lighting in a less rowdy place? And perseverance.

You seem stuck on the fact you've seen great results... those are probably from people who took their time, really. 'Digital' doesn't mean 'instant'.