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View Full Version : A Panorama for Rhys - Sedona, Arizona



John_Reed
11-21-2004, 09:12 PM
A 5-panel panorama (taken with FZ10, manual exposure) of the town of Sedona, AZ at Sundown, with Thunder Mountain and other surrounding Red Rock beauties. This shot looks North, which puts the famous "Oak Creek Canyon" in the far background.
http://john-reed.smugmug.com/photos/11614969-O.jpg
This is another challenge for Rhys: Can you find any seams? I can't. :o

ReF
11-22-2004, 01:30 AM
Nice pana. What kind of software are you using? Any special techniques?

leewitt
11-22-2004, 05:14 AM
The pano is not level. It slopes up to the right. Also, Oak Creek Canyon is to the far right out of the picture.

Jim Last
11-22-2004, 06:11 AM
The pano is not level. It slopes up to the right. Also, Oak Creek Canyon is to the far right out of the picture.
leewitt, Stop nit picking :)

John, love it, what an awesome landscape!

Question: I guess if the clouds were moving faster then the stiching would become a bit of a knightmare?

Any reccommendations for dealing with a panaroma shot under windy conditions, unless the sky is 100% cloud free.

John_Reed
11-22-2004, 07:46 AM
The pano is not level. It slopes up to the right. Also, Oak Creek Canyon is to the far right out of the picture.Are you sure you could see the whole Pano? The shots were taken from the top of "Airport Mesa;" With a 5-shot "sweep" of any landscape above the plane of the Earth, there's bound to be some "wide barrel" distortion, since you're mapping a considerable arc of the scenery onto a flat medium, in this case the screen. So, at least from my perspective, I see the left side sloping UP, the middle about "level," and the right side sloping DOWN. Also, Oak Creek is a tributary of the Verde River, I think (poor mis-informed tourist, possibly? :cool: ), and I think their confluence occurs somewhere inside Sedona's city limits - So I think that technically, Sedona itself is in "Oak Creek Canyon." But that would be missing the point.

John_Reed
11-22-2004, 08:07 AM
John, love it, what an awesome landscape!

Question: I guess if the clouds were moving faster then the stiching would become a bit of a knightmare?

Any reccommendations for dealing with a panaroma shot under windy conditions, unless the sky is 100% cloud free.Jim, I'm glad you like the scene! As to your questions:
In this case, the clouds were moving slowly enough that the 2-3 seconds between shots would see negligible movement. So I was able to use Panorama Maker 3 (from ArcSoft) to do the stitching, and no adjustments were needed to "tweak it up" afterwards, except for cropping. Since it was handheld, there are bound to be slight angular variations as you go along, but the program deals with that stuff automatically. You're absolutely right about movement; I tried to make a sunset panorama of Hawai'i a couple of months ago, and the wave motion of the water proved to make it impossible through the "automatic" program; I wound up manually merging the images in Photoshop. In this shot, there are actually cars moving on the streets in the lower part; I was lucky not to chop one them in half!
"Recommendations?" Here are some:
1) Set the camera's focal length to somewhere in the "normal" (~50-70mm) range (in 35mm equivalent. I can't "dial in" the number exactly on my Panasonic, so I tweak the zoom out to 2X, and then nudge it back into the high end of 1X before shooting.
2) Use manual exposure if you can. That way your color intensity, sky color, etc., will be unchanged from panel to panel. I adjust aperture and shutter speed for what looks like (through my EVF) a good dynamic range of color and contrast in a preliminary sweep of the scene, and then just shoot away, from left to right.
3) Make sure to create some significant overlap between images as you scan. Make whatever is on the far right side of image #1 is the left-most subject of image #2...
4) When using Panorama Maker, I've found that rather than selecting a particular focal length of lens for it to simulate, I do better when I select "Automatic Camera" and let the program figure out exactly what the taking focal length was.

Rhys
11-23-2004, 09:55 AM
Nice panorama. I can't see the joins in that one at all. That's the funny thing about auto-stitching software - sometimes it does an excellent job as it has here - but sometimes it can be ghastly. I have an excellent panorama of a wildfowl pond and it's impossible to see the joins. I have a panorama of Klaipeda in Lithuania and the joints are all painfully visible. In fact, I did a better job stitching that together, myself.

I've been doing mainly videos in the US although I have taken quite a few stills - no panoramas as yet.

John_Reed
11-23-2004, 10:19 AM
Nice panorama. I can't see the joins in that one at all. That's the funny thing about auto-stitching software - sometimes it does an excellent job as it has here - but sometimes it can be ghastly. I have an excellent panorama of a wildfowl pond and it's impossible to see the joins. I have a panorama of Klaipeda in Lithuania and the joints are all painfully visible. In fact, I did a better job stitching that together, myself.

I've been doing mainly videos in the US although I have taken quite a few stills - no panoramas as yet.Thanks for looking. That's happened to me too, particularly when I tried to include ocean waves in the scenes, which my "Panorama Maker" software totally balked at. But if I use manual exposure, so that there are no variations of shades through the sweep, and if there are no appreciable movements going on in the scene, the PM software seems to "get it right" most of the time, without any after-adjustments other than cropping. In fact, if you look at my pano, the crop fell a little short on the right edge. :o