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google
07-27-2006, 02:52 PM
Hi everyone, im new here and would like to know a few things! Here's my situation:

I have seen pictures that people have taken with long shutter speeds where light is used and is trailed along the picture e.g in this motorway picture http://www.alt.ac.uk/altc2005/motorway.JPG

I have an Olympus E-500 (It's Great) and I have tried increasing and decreasing shutter speeds but all I get are very dark or very bright pictures? It probably sounds really stupid but I dont know why it is doing that?!

Regards,
James.
(Image copyright University of Manchester)

zachwass2000
07-27-2006, 02:56 PM
James,
I am not very experienced in this, but from what I've read I have this to say:
Are you using full manual mode? It would be best to put the camera on Shutter Priority mode for shots like these. You can set the shutter to whatever speed you need and the camera will automatically adjust the aperture to compensate for the amount of extra light that will be coming in with the longer speed. If this doesn't help, I definitely don't know. I'm too much of an amateur to give any advice beyond this. Please report back and tell if it works though.
Zach

google
07-27-2006, 03:12 PM
Ok, thanks for the advice! I will practice with that info on with the moon tonight!

Regards,
James.

Warin
07-29-2006, 04:41 PM
Ok, thanks for the advice! I will practice with that info on with the moon tonight!

Regards,
James.

Shooting the moon actually requires fairly fast shutter speeds, since it is so damn bright. If you start using slower shutter speeds, you get a big white ball in the sky.

This (http://home.hiwaay.net/~krcool/Astro/moon/howtophoto/) is an excellent primer on Lunar photography.

Rick M
08-03-2006, 05:56 AM
These night shots are actually very complicated, because you have to deal with varying intensities of light (the stationary street lights, the moving car lights, etc.) and with the fact that some of the lights are much brighter than others (front lights of the cars vs. rear lights). There really is no system or light meter that can help, and certainly the camera's own light meter will probably be totally fooled by this. I would put he camera on completely manual mode, select a fairly small aperature (say f8) and then begin to experiment with shutter speeds. Generally, you will want a longer shutter speed to capture more of the movement of the lights. After that, it is just trial and error. This is the nice thing about the digital, you can experiment and see the result instantly. Then, and now I will be a bit controversial, once I had the exposure where I wanted it, I would shoot this with film, using the exposure derived from the digital. IMHO, film is still better than digital for this type of extreme contrast shot.

coldrain
08-03-2006, 06:23 AM
Hi everyone, im new here and would like to know a few things! Here's my situation:

I have seen pictures that people have taken with long shutter speeds where light is used and is trailed along the picture e.g in this motorway picture http://www.alt.ac.uk/altc2005/motorway.JPG

I have an Olympus E-500 (It's Great) and I have tried increasing and decreasing shutter speeds but all I get are very dark or very bright pictures? It probably sounds really stupid but I dont know why it is doing that?!

Regards,
James.
(Image copyright University of Manchester)
Use the setting of the camera that allows you to choose the shutterspeed (long), while the camera itself chooses the aperture, to get the correct exposure. This way you will notice that changing the shutter speed will not alter the brightness of the photo.

wh0128
08-03-2006, 05:12 PM
Hi everyone, im new here and would like to know a few things! Here's my situation:

I have seen pictures that people have taken with long shutter speeds where light is used and is trailed along the picture e.g in this motorway picture http://www.alt.ac.uk/altc2005/motorway.JPG

I have an Olympus E-500 (It's Great) and I have tried increasing and decreasing shutter speeds but all I get are very dark or very bright pictures? It probably sounds really stupid but I dont know why it is doing that?!

Regards,
James.
(Image copyright University of Manchester)

Just use full manual mode, set shutter speed and aperture accordingly so you get the right amount of light by looking in your viewfinder to see the meter. Or you could point the camera at some spot in the picture where there is enough light and use Auto-Exposure Lock and it will lock the exposure. Some cameras you might have to hold it inorder for it to work. You could also see what speed of ISO your shooting at. Try and pic the lowest ISO available so you need a slower shutter speed and wider aperture inorder to record the correct amount of light. Stop back in and show us some of your pics that you have tried with.